Software Challenge

Do you remember when Microsoft Word replaced ‘menus’ with the ‘ribbon’. If so, you likely also remember frustration tyring to figure out how to get this ‘new’ version of Word to do tasks that were simple before. Unfortunately, I didn’t have time to play around in the new version of Word and Excel before having to use them in my work. I’m sure this overnight transition to the ‘ribbon’ added to my frustration.

That’s why I am thankful to be able to participate in the ‘review’ of RootsMagic 8. This transition from RM 7 to RM 8 will be similar to a transition from MS Word with menus to MS Word with the ribbon. With RootsMagic 8, the pull down menus are gone. Instead, the ‘menu headings’ are down the side of the screen. Clicking on any one of those headings opens up the respective window.

For the most part, everything is intuitive. That is until I’m trying to locate something and can’t remember how to get to it.

I had previously worked with creating a group in RootsMagic 8, and had even blogged about it in my RM8 Fact List Report post. So today, I created a group and then couldn’t figure out how to view who was included in that group.

Thankfully, the RootsMagic 8 Preview group on Facebook came thru with the answer. I had forgotten to look for that downward carrot symbol signaling a pull down menu. Thanks to the Facebook help, I easily found that pull down carrot. When clicked on, it revealed my list of groups.

Re-finding that pull down allowed me to select my newly created, Garrard County KY event group and browse the list of people in the group.

Even though I hadn’t found that pull-down carrot, I had checked a lot of the other places one can find menu options.

Three Vertical Dots

One of those places is a set of three vertical dots. When working with a list of people, clicking on those three dots opens an ‘options’ menu.

Besides the three dots associated with the Index, there are three dots associated with the pedigree window.

From that menu,

  • open a window showing the list of fact types
  • open a Search and Replace window
  • switch to the TASKS window and show the tasks for the highlighted person

At the very top of the program on the right side of the screen is another set of three vertical dots. Clicking on these dots opens a menu to access help, updates, support, etc.

People Menu Icons

In the upper right of the people screen are several icons. Clicking on those icons opens other menus.

WRENCH MENU – People screen

PENCIL MENU – People Screen

The Plus Sign icon and the Trash Can Icon are obvious. They open menus for adding or deleting people.

Command Palette

In the upper right corner of the screen is an icon that looks like a paint palette. This icon opens the command palette.

Learning to use RootsMagic 8 will require the willingness to look for and click on these various icons, including the upside down carrot.

Places Menu – Three Dots
Sources Menu – Three Dots
Media Menu – Three Dots
Tasks Menu – Three Dots
Addresses Menu – Three Dots
Search Menu – Three Dots
Publish Menu – Does NOT have a Three Dots menu

I’m enjoying this opportunity to explore RootsMagic 8. This ability to explore and learn without impacting my actual family tree is greatly appreciated. Even though the menus are different, there are features in RootsMagic 8 that I’m looking forward to being able to use. I will make the transition when the program is released.

Helen Crawford Horton

Helen Marjorie Crawford was born on 30 Apr 1900 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.18

She was the child of Judson Foster Crawford and Josie Winifred Hammond.1,7

She lived at 4th Ave in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in Jul 1900.9 Helen Crawford was listed on the 1900 census as the daughter of J. F. Crawford. According to the census, Helen was 8 months old and born in Kansas.

Helen lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 1 Jul 1905.10 Helen Crawford was listed on the 1905 Kansas census in the household of J. F. Crawford. According to the census, Helen was 5 years old.

She lived at 2nd Ward in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 28 Apr 1910.11 Helen Crawford was listed on the 1910 census as the daughter of J. F. Crawford. According to the census, Helen was 14 years old and born in Kansas.

She lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 1 Jul 1915.12 Hellen Crawford was listed as a 14 year old female in the household of J. F. Crawford living in Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas on the 1905 Kansas census.

In 1916, Helen was educated at Dodge City High School in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.13 Helen Crawford was listed on the Freshman Class roll at Dodge City High School in 1916.

She married Russell C. Horton on 16 Jul 1919 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.1,6,1417

She lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 7 Jan 1920.1819 Helen Horton was listed on the 1920 census as the wife of Russel C. Horton. According to the census, Helen was 19 years old and born in Kansas.

On 13 Oct 1920, Russell Clifton Horton Jr. was born in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.2021

On 11 Jan 1923, Marjorie Louise Horton was born in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.22

She lived at 107 Poplar in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 1 Jul 1925.23 Helen Horton is listed on the 1925 Kansas census in the household of Russell Horton. According to the census, Helen was 24 years old and born in Kansas.

On 1 Jul 1926, Elaine Marilyn Horton was born in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.24

Helen lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 3 Apr 1930.25 Helen M Horton is listed on the 1930 census as the wife of Russel C Horton. According to the census, Helen was 29 years old and born in Kansas. The census indicates that Helen was married at the age of 19.

She lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in 1935.26

She lived at 615 10th Street in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 9 Apr 1940.26 Helen Horton is listed on the 1940 census as the wife of Russel Horton. According to the census, Helen was 39 years old and born in Kansas.

Helen lived in San Angelo, Tom Green, Texas, United States in 1946.27 Helen Horton is listed in the 1946 San Angelo Texas directory as the wife of Russell C Horton. The couple was residing at 117E Avenue I at the time.

She lived in Gila Bend, Maricopa, Arizona, United States in 1958.28

She lived in El Paso, El Paso, Texas, United States in 1971.29

Helen died on 1 Nov 1971 at the age of 71 in El Paso, El Paso, Texas, United States.34,6,8,2935

She was buried on 5 Nov 1971 at Fort Bliss National Cemetery in El Paso, El Paso, Texas, United States.3,8,3439 

ENDNOTES:

        1. Crawford, Judson F., Judson F. Crawford Family Bible (n.p.: , n.d.); Marcia Philbrick, Seneca, KS, photocopy in Crawford.Washington.Notebook

        2. Kansas, State Board of Health, Birth Certificate no. 00 003076 (30 April 1900), Helen Crawford; Division of Vital Statistics, Topeka, Kansas.

        3. Find a Grave, database and images, Find a Grave (www.findagrave.com : viewed online August 2016), memorial for Helen Marjorie Crawford Horton (1900-1971), Find a Grave Memorial no. #805928, created by imported from U.S. Veteran’s Affairs, citing Fort Bliss National Cemetery, El Paso, El Paso County, Texas; accompanying photograph by Charles Bowman, Helen Marjorie Crawford Horton.

        4. Ancestry.com, Texas, Death Certificates, 1903-1982 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013), Texas Department of State Health Services; Austin Texas, USA; Texas Death Certificates, 1903–1982.

        5. “Local News,” The Dodge City Globe (Dodge City, Kansas), 3 May 1900, page 8; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 13 August 2021).

        6. “Judson Foster Crawford”, Gladys Crawford, compiler, The Crawford Family (n.p., Gladys Crawford, n.d.), (Doc. #: Crawford.KS.047)

        7. Local News, Dodge City Reporter, Dodge City, Kansas, 4 May 1900, page 5, (Doc. #: Crawford.KS.135).

        8. National Cemetery Administration, “U.S. Veterans Gravesites, ca. 1775-2006,”Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online (August 2017), Helen Marjorie Horton; National Cemetery Administration.

        9. 1900 U.S.Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, ED 49, Sheet 18A Image 35 of 42, household 383, Crawford J F; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA T623

        10. 1905 Kansas State Census, Ford County, Kansas, Kansas State Census, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, page 42 Image 83 of 178, household 291, J F Crawford; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); Kansas State Historical Society

        11. 1910 U.S. Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kanass, ED 45, Sheet 3B Image 6 of 30, household 16, Crawford JF; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T624

        12. 1915 Kansas State Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, page 2 Image 73 of 279, household 9, Crawford J F; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); Kansas State Historical Society

        13. 1916 Sou’Wester: Dodge City High School (Dodge City: n.p., 1916),p. 39 and 41.  digital image, U.S., Schoo Yearbooks, 1900-1999Ancestry.com, http://www.ancestry.com viewed online 22 August 2021.

        14. Ford County Kansas Marriage Records: Book E p. 329 (Doc. #: CRAWFORD.KS.003A), Ford County Clerk, Dodge City, Kansas

        15. Ex-Soldier Weds Dodge City Girl, Dodge City Daily Globe (Dodge City, Kansas), , 17 Jul 1919, page 1 col. 3.

        16. Kansas, Central Division of Vital Statistics, Marriage Certificate #31929 (16 July 1919), Russel C. Horton and Helen Crawford; State of Kansas, Topeka, KS.

        17. , Kansas, Central Division of Vital Statistics; State of Kansas, Topeka, KS. (N.p.: n.p., n.d.), Marriage Certificate; #31929; 16 July 1919; Russel C. Horton and Helen Crawford.

        18. 1920 U.S. Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, ED 53, sheet 1A (image 1 of 22) Image 1 of 22, household 12, Horton Russel C; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017); NARA microfilm publication T625

        19. “Injury Fatal to M. R. Crawford,” The Dodge City Kansas Journal (Dodge City, Kansas), 29 July 1920, page 1; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 8 August 2021).

        20. Social Security Administration, “Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007,” database on-line, Ancestry, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/60901/ : viewed online December 2016), Russel Clifton Horton Jr.

        21. “Recent Births,” The Dodge City Journal (Dodge City, Kansas), 4 November 1920, page 1; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 22 August 2021).

        22. Dodge City Daily Globe, 15 Jan 1923, page 3.

        23. 1925 Kansas Census, Ford County Kansas, Dodge City, page 24 Image 27 of 202, dwelling 7, Russell Horton; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online March 2016)

        24. Dodge City Daily Globe, 1 Jul 1926, page 3 col. 2.

        25. 1930 U.S. Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, ED 8, sheet 2B (image 4 of 36) Image 4 of 36, household 37 (on 2 pages), Horton Helen; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online June 2017); NARA T626

        26. 1940 U. S. Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, ED 29-11, sheet 5B Image 9 and 10 of 30, household 111 (on 2 pages), Horton Helen; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017)

        27. Worley’s San Angelo (Tom Green County, Tex.) City Directory 1946 (Dallas, Texas: John F. Worley Directory Co.,, 1946), p. 205, Russel C. Horton; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2016).

        28. “Horton,” Arizona Republic (Phoenix, Arizona), 30 January 1958, page 51; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online December 2019).

        29. Texas, Texas, Death Certificates, 1903-2000, Helen Marjorie HOrton, 4 February 1972; database with images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online August 2016).

        30. Dodge City Daily Globe, 8 Nov 1971, page 2 col 2, Monday, Nov. 8, 1971, page 2 column 2 (Doc. #: CRAWFORD.KS.137).

        31. “El Paso County, Texas Death Record Search,”El Paso County Texas,  (http://www.epcounty.com/publicrecords/deathrecords/DeathRecordSearch.aspx : viewed online (July 2017), Helen Horton – 11/01/1971.

        32. Ancestry.com, Web: El Paso County, Texas, Death Index, 1956-2010 (Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011), El Paso County Texas Clerk; El Paso, Texas; Death Records.

        33. Ancestry.com, Texas Death Index, 1903-2000 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006).

        34. Ancestry.com, Web: Texas, Find A Grave Index, 1761-2012 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012).

        35. “Horton,” El Paso Times (El Paso, Texas), 3 November 1971, page 19; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online October 2019).

        36. , “Fort Bliss National Cemetery,” database, Interment.net (www.interment.net : viewed online March 2017), Helen Horton.

        37. , “U.S. Veterans Burial Sites, 1775-2013,” database, MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com : viewed online March 2017), Helen Marjorie Horton.

        38. Ancestry Database, U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012).

        39. National Cemetery Administration, U.S. Veterans’ Gravesites, ca.1775-2006 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006).

Deeply American

Did you test your DNA at Ancestry? If so, have you checked the newly updated ethnicity results? For some, these results might provide clues for further research.

For me, they are basically useless. When others have asked me about my ethnicity, I sometimes jokingly reply that I’m American. When asked for clarification, I explain that my family has been in what becomes the United States for a very long time. I often also stated that I didn’t know most of my immigrant ancestors. Prior to today, I could identify three likely immigrant ancestors.

  • David Ralston – immigrated in 1803
  • Phillip Andre Mentzer — immigrated prior to1800
  • Conrad Broils – immigrated in 1717

If asked where my ancestors were from, I often responded with Kentucky. Kentucky is where several of my brick walls end. If pushed to identify countries, I would have responded, England, Scotland, possibly Ireland, Germany and Scandinavia. Since I hadn’t actually identified my immigrant ancestors, I was just guessing. To eliminate some of this guesswork, I decided to try and identify my immigrant ancestors.

To do this, I used the ability of RootsMagic to interface with the FamilySearch tree. Using the FamilySearch tree as a guide, I added ancestors starting about generation 9 and working back to the immigrant ancestor. Since I use color coding in my tree to identify various lines, I decided to color code my immigrants with the color teal. Most of these immigrant ancestors are in generations 12 thru generation 16.

I realize that I have a LOT of research ahead of me to add sourcing for all of the ancestors I just added to my tree. However, the process has helped me learn a lot about my tree.

  • Many of my lines trace back to Middlesex county, Massachusetts
  • I have quite a few ancestors going back to New Amsterdam

Unfortunately, the Ahnentafel that I had hoped to share is over 50 pages long and thus way too long to share in a blog post. Even though I likely will never print that report, my work to identify these potential ancestors will help me as I continue researching my family history.

Using the Ahnentafel, I decided to count the countries of origin for my immigrant ancestors. Although prone to error, this tally does show that my ethnicity should be predominantly English.

GenerationCountry# from Country
7Ireland1
8England1
8Canada1
8Germany3
9Scotland3
9England2
9Ireland6
9Germany10
10Netherlands1
10Ireland3
10Germany5
10Scotland4
10England4
11Germany4
11Netherlands14
11England48
11Scotland1
11France5
11Ireland2
11Wales1
12Germany5
12England150
12Netherlands16
12Scotland4
12Ireland2
12France3
12Wales2
12Belgium1
12Denmark1

The tally continues thru generations 13, 14 and 15 with over 100 more immigrant ancestors from England. Thus it makes sense when my ‘DNA STORY’ on Ancestry indicates a large percentage for English ethnicity.

My brother’s DNA stories:

My mother’s DNA story is a little different. The large block of German DNA would be her father’s line that does go back to Germany.

At this point, I can’t explain the Swedish DNA. However, there are several lines, including my Thompson line, that are stuck in (you guessed it) Kentucky.

Even though my ahnentafel and my DNA story indicate that I have deep English roots, I still contend that I have a deeply American tree.

Merchants State Bank

When researching your family, have you ever encountered a newspaper article that lead to an event the family likely wanted to forget? I would think that being a director of a bank that failed might fall into that ‘want to forget’ category. But, that is where my research in the Dodge City papers has led.

In February of 1886, the Merchants State Bank was formed and J. H. Crawford was one of the directors.

The Merchants’ State Bank

The Merchants State Bank is a new banking institution of Dodge City, and is composed of some of our most influential and wealthy citizens. Geo. B. Cox is President, F. C. Zimemrmann, Vice-President; James Langton, Treasurer, and the following directors: Goe S. Emerson, W. C. Shinn, O. Marsh, W. G. Sherlock, T. L. McCarty and J. H. Crawford. The office of the bank for the present will be located in the postoffice block. As soon as one of the new building is completed ample room will be obtained. This bank will be one of the best in the country, and will meet with confidence and support.

Dodge City Times (Dodge City, Kansas) 25 Feb 1886
Dodge City Times (Dodge City, Kansas) 25 Feb 1886

In 1887, the Dodge City Times was singing the praises of the bank as one of the “most prosperous institutions in the west.” (Dodge City Times 4 Aug 1887) However, by March of 1891, The Dodge City Daily Globe reported the bank had failed.

Gone Under

The Merchants’ State Bank Ceases Operations Friday at Noon

A Full and Complete List of Assets and Liabilities – C. W. Averill Appointed Assignee

Notwithstanding the many rumors concerning the shaky condition of the Merchants’ State Bank it was a matter of great surprise when the doors were locked Friday last. Deposits to the amount of several thousand dollars had been recently withdrawn by parties who knew of the insufficient security that had been taken by the bank upon loses made during the last 18 months. This with the stringent times and depreciated real estate values made it impossible to much longer hold out, and upon the presentation of a check for nearly $4,000 they refused to pay it, for lack of funds. A number of attachments immediately followed. The first being in favor of H. M. Beverley.

The bank was the repository for many school districts, as well as the county and city resources.

The real estate assets of the institution are heavily encumbered and their cash value is difficult to estimate. Although the county may sustain some loss, it will not affect the price of county scrip as there is much more money on deposit in the First National Bank than the total amount of scrip outstanding. Also the amount deposited in the defunct bank was the sinking fund, and should it not all be recovered the loss will be lightly felt by the county.

The complicated affairs of the bank will require some time for a full examination and much litigation will undoubtedly result. A majority of the creditors seem willing to give the bank officials ample time to make settlement. Some, however, seem to think that at least criminal carelessness ahs been shown in the management of the bank and it is not improbable that some prosecutions will follow. A. E. Grier, representing the Rollins Investment Company, of Denver was in the city Monday to investigate the company’s business, they having $4,00 in Ford county scrip which had been forwarded to Merchants State Bank for collection. The county’s check had been given for the amount of the scrip, there being a large amount to the county’s credit, but the check was not accepted by the bank. In some way the scrip has fallen into the possession of the county treasurer and the Rollins Investment Company will bring suit to recover the scrip or its cash value. They have retained Sutton & McGarry to protect their interests.

Shortly after the first attachment issued the county attorney asked that a receiver be appointed, and L. G. Grobety was made receiver. Soon after the receiver had qualified and demanded possession an assignment was made to C. W. Averill. The commissioners and county attorney are awake to the interests of the county, but with the several attachments in the hands of the sheriff, the assignee and receiver each attempting to obtain possession, the assets will be used up in the payment of fees.

The liabilities, with names of creditors, are given below:

Liabilities

H. M. Beverley, Dodge City, treas. $3,495.00
H. B. Bell 11.22
Thos. Brainbridge 100.00
Mrs Brainbridge 3.00
J. R. Bricker 20.00
S. H. Connoway 78.32
Geo B. Cox Co. Treas $20,765.47
Geo B. Cox mortg ac’t 1.00
Geo B. Cox seed com 139.72
Geo B. Cox Flax com 16.67
Geo B. Cox fair ass’n 1.55
J. H. Crawford 12.98
F. W. Coxon 9.92
A. L. Crawford 10.90
J. H. Churchill .35
D. H> Connoway 562.00
G. Davis 138.75
J. M. Doble 9.40
S.W. Furgison 10.00
W.J. Fitzgerald 2.14
Albert Fasig 52.43
P.R. Hobble 144.07
A. Hanna tres dist 16 118.13
E. A. Hickerson Lodge ac’t 176.05
C. L. Kearful 100.00
W.T. Keady 1.20
E. Kirkpatrick .02
Geo. Gray 5.30
Geo H. Karch .78
Thos. Lahey 125.54
L. E. McGarry 165.67
Otto Mueller 2.35
E. W. Marvin 181.42
McCarty & Hoover 34.78
T. L. McCarty 100.06
D. W. Moffit 20.25
W. F. Petillion .17
J. E. Rarden schl tres 100.00
J. H. Ripple .01
J. S. Rush 3.00
A. W. Reudy .01
John Riney schl tres 434.07
T. L. Smith .98
C. E. Smiley schl tres 229.36
Strange & Summersby 45.37
L.K. Soper 19.80
Sam Stubbs 9.11
H. L. Sitler 3.56
E. E. Smith 12.58
Joseph Sizelove schl Tres 118.61
E. T. Thome 12.03
Samuel Wollman 10.56
B.W. Williams .69
G. H. Wilcoxson schl tres 63.25
D. T. Weagly 464.83
Jas. Youngblood .25
Zimmerman hd. Co 12.05
D. H Drake .36
E L. M. Hoare .66
Adam Schmidt 98.30
O. Elswick 800.00
J.F. Dean 50.00
J. M. Kilburn 50.00
J. Beyers 90.00
John Reed 50.00
A. Miller 500.00
J. Collar 1.00
S. S. Griggs 7.00

Dodge City Globe (Dodge City, Kansas) 4 Mar 1891

Then in September of 1891, The Dodge City Daily Globe carried a story describing the cause of the bank failure.

The Recorded Facts

How the Taxes Were Absorbed by the Cox Dynasty

Through the courtesy of the receiver of the Merchant’s State Bank the Globe-Republican scribe has been permitted to make a thorough examination of that defunct institution, and the memoranda therein made by Mr. Cox himself and his employes, most emphatically verify the very worst that has been even suspected by the writer. Space will not permit us this week to give the data in detail, but we have the dates and items carefully preserved for future reference. We will this week briefly summerise the situation, giving fuller details later on in the campaign.

In November, 1887, Geo. B. Cox was elected county treasurer for the first time, over C. N. Van Vilet, who was deputy treasurer under R. M. Wright. In October, 1888, Mr. Wright turned over to Mr. Cox, his successor, every dollar of public funds entrusted to his care as such treasurer, with the books in perfect order. Otto Mueller was installed as deputy by the new treasurer, and has remained in personal supervision of the office until recently, in communication by letter between himself and Mr. Cox, he suggested that the latter return and take charge, while he, Otto, shall make the campaign for election this fall. This suggestion was acted upon and is now in operation.

After taking control of the office, Mr. Cox, who was president and principal stockholder of the Merchants State Bank, made an arrangement, which is permitted by the statutes of this state, whereby his bank was designated by the board of county commissioners as the depository of count funds, on a security bond filed with the county clerk and approved by the board. Mr. Cox gave as such bond his own name and that of one other stockholder and director of the bank, whose stock together with that of Mr. Cox, soon constituted a good working majority of bank shares. — After this, when Mr. Cox had occasion to use money in his private business, or desired to favor a friend or political striker, he could drop into the bank in his official capacity as county treasurer, deposit the cash collections of taxes with Geo. B. Cox, banker. Then Geo. B. Cox, the business man, could write his check or promissory note, leave it with Geo B. Cox, the banker, and take the money to use as pleased him best. The state of affairs continued till the fall of 1889, when the bank had cashed about as much paper bearing the Cox autograph as that gentleman was apparently worth. Then, by herculean effort, and the lavish expenditure of money, he was re-elected against L. Sims, the regular republican nominee. With a new lease of power, Mr. Cox now delved deeper than ever into the treasury vaults In the spring of 1890 the bank held much more paper against him than his entire visible assets could be made to sell for in cash. But as county taxes came in he continued to deposit them in the bank and borrow the money for his own use, and although hopelessly insolvent, took no less than thirteen thousand dollars in addition to what he already owed. The other stock holder who was on the bond to secure the county, was ere this hopelessly involved, notwithstanding which fact he must be provided for, as he had worked tooth and nail for the election of Mr. Cox. Hence he was permitted to take eight thousand dollars of good money. These two hauls left the bank utterly unable to meet the demands of the county, city and school district depositors, and the bond on file with the county clerk having become worthless by the insolvency of the sureties, (who in reality constituted the principal on whose behalf the security was given,) the taxpayers of Ford county have nothing to show for about thirty thousand dollars paid into the treasury as municipal taxes, except the possibility of a slender dividend which the closing out of odds and ends of the collapsed institution may realize. All this money will have to be collected over again in addition to that needed for future current expenses of the county. Old Ford is one of the best counties in the state and by prudent administration of her affairs hereafter, will soon recuperate her wasted resources, but woe be unto us if we again renew the power of the vampire which has to greedily absorbed our revenues in the past.

The Dodge City Globe (Dodge City, Kansas) 2 Sep 1891

The September 10, 1891 issue of the Dodge City Globe contains a letter from Geo. B. Cox outlining where the money went. Later papers have several notices for the sale of property owned by Geo. B. Cox and his wife, Amy. Even though the papers covered the scandal and hinted at criminal charges, a search of the papers thru 1892 did not uncover a criminal trial.

Thus, the Merchants State Bank where J. H. Crawford served as a director in 1886 was a failure five years later.

Iowa House

Have you ever tried to research the history of a house? Recently, I learned that my ancestor, Marion (Washington Marion) Crawford, ran a boarding house called Iowa House in early Dodge City.

Since I knew nothing about the Iowa House in early Dodge City, I decided to see what the newspapers had to say about it.

1882

W. C. Beebe has rented the house west of the postoffice, formerly occupied as a court house,, owned by A. J. anthony, which he will open as a hotel, and will be known as the Iowa house. Mr. Beebe is an old hotel man and no doubt will make the Iowa house strictly first class in every particular

The Dodge City Globe (Dodge City, Kansas) 14 Mar 1882
Dodge City Times (Dodge City, Kansas) 23 Mar 1882

Notice to the Public

I have recently opened and fitted up the Iowa House, on Front street, one block west of postoffice, in first class style. Everything pertaining to the house is neat and new, and no pains will be spared to make it home-like and pleasant for customers. My tables will always be supplied with the best the markets afford. Thanking the public for their liberal patronage in the past, I hope to receive a fair share of the same in the future. Call and give me a trial.

W. C. Beebe
Prop’r Iowa House

The Dodge City Globe (Dodge City, Kansas) 16 May 1882

The proprietor of the Iowa House has been compelled to rent two or three small buildings in the vicinity of his hotel, to accommodate some of his regular boarders with lodging.

The Dodge City Globe (Dodge City, Kansas) 4 Jul 1882

Preparations are being made at the Iowa House to greatly improve the range and variety of the bill of far, so as to furnish meals equal to the very best in the city. The patronage of the house has been increasing very largely of late, and some much needed improvements have been made in the office, dining room, and other parts of the building.

The Dodge City Globe (Dodge City, Kansas) 4 Jul 1882

1882

P. R. Hobble has taken charge of the Iowa House and no doubt make a success of the management. We wish also good luck.

Dodge City Times (Dodge City, Kansas) 14 Sep 1882

1883

P. R. Hobble has sold the Iowa House to N. Mendehall of Iowa, who has taken charge of the house. The new landlord has had considerable experience at hotel keeping. We wish him success.

Dodge City Times (Dodge City, Kansas) 14 Jun 1883

1884

N. Mendenhall has disposed of the Iowa House to Mr. Crawford, a brother of J. H. Crawford. The new Iowa House landlord is lately from Indiana.

Dodge City Times (Dodge City, Kansas) 25 Sep 1884

Even though the newspapers reported that Mr. Crawford took over the Iowa House, the advertising did not reflect that change in ownership.

Dodge City Times (Dodge City, Kansas) 30 Oct 1884

In January of 1885, a fire spread from the postoffice East along Front Street destroying most of the block to the East of the Iowa House.

Caught It at Last

About three o’clock last Sunday smoke and flames were seen issuing from the grocery house of Perry Wilden. It was inevitable, in the estimation of everybody who saw them that the buildings in the post office block were doomed to immediate destruction. The first thought was to save goods and the work of relieving the business houses adjacent of their stores was commenced with vigor. a thousand people were soon in the vicinity of the fire and everybody lent a willing hand in the effort to rescue property from the destructive breath of the flames. The first building west of Wilden’s was the Union Restaurant which ended in smoke at the drop of the hat. West of that was THE COWBOY building. Before the flames reached it all of the goods in the lower story had been removed. Marsh & Sons had a splendid stock of clothing and gents’ furnishings goods in the front room and Mr. Robbins had a tailor shop with appurtenances and a choice selection of raw goods in the rear, nearly everything was saved. THE COWBOY occupied the whole of the second story. Material probably to the value of five hundred dollars was rescued form there. The power press was destroyed and a large portion of the type was badly “pied.” A printing office is one of the worst institutions in the world to handle when a fire is around. Across the street west from THE COWBOY building is the Iowa House. By heroic efforts it was saved from destruction. At one time all of the east side was in a blaze. Had this building been destroyed the appetite of the fire demon would not have been appeased until every building in the Iowa House block and been swallowed up. Across the railroad on the south the warehouses of R. M. Wright & Co., and Morris collar caught fire and were destroyed, will all of their contents. The warehouse of the York-Parker-Draper company was said to have been saved by the mineral paint on the outside. East of Wilden’s was the dry goods house of Gaede, Baker Co. The building went up a flying, but the most of the goods were saved. Next was Morris Collar’s hardware store and general curiosity shop. It was impossible to save much of his stock, owing to t he nature of the goods. His stock was valued at $30,000, most of which is a total loss. His insurance was only about $2,000. Next was the hardware store and tin shop of Charlie Shields. It went to kingdom come in a hurry, with most of the stock. Mr. Shields is one of the greatest sufferers of this calamity His stock is worth about $4,000 and he hadn’t a dime of insurance. Now here is where the virtue of Brick is demonstrated. East of Shield’s is the brick store just being erected by Jacob Collar. The brick wall was too much for Mr. Fire. His stomach couldn’t digest the brick and he quit his infernal deviltry right then and there. Jake Collar is the man to whom is indebted the salvation of the buildings in the post office Block east of his new business block.

The Times figured up the losses as follows:

Perry Wilden, loss $11,000; insurance $5,000
Albert Etherington, loss $2,800; no insurance
O. Marsh & son, building loss, $2,500; insured; partial loss of goods, covered by insurance
R. R. Robbins, tailor, loss $100; no insurance
COWBOY office, loss $2,000, covered by small insurance
Gaede, Baker & Co., partial loss of goods covered by $5,000 insurance
M. Collar, building and goods, loss $30,000; insurance $2,000
F. J. Durand, building, loss $1,500; no insurance
J. Collar, two buildings, loss $4,000, covered by insurance
Chas. Shields, stock of stoves and hardware, loss $4,000; no insurance
Gorman & Ramer, loss of stock, covered by insurance

Kansas Cowboy (Dodge City, Kansas) 24 Jan 1885

1885

S. B. McNay has taken charge of the Iowa House and will refit the building for the accommodation of the public. He will afford first-class accommodations. Mr. McNay has just returned from Iowa with his family, and took possession of the house on Monday. He is an agreeable and pleasant gentleman and will make an accommodating landlord. He is bound to succeed.

Dodge City Times (Dodge City, Kansas) 23 Apr 1885

1885

W. F. Dean has taken charge of the Iowa House and will change the name of the house to the Dean House.

Dodge City Times (Dodge City, Kansas) 14 May 1885

The newspapers do no reveal any more information about the Crawford proprietorship of the Iowa House. However, in July 1885, the Crawford family built their own boarding house located North of the downtown district.

My Germanna Connection

Well, it’s Saturday afternoon and I’m working on my genealogy while watching the K-State (Kansas State University) football game on TV. As the wildcats were winning their game, I decided to check out Randy Seaver’s Genea-Musings blog to see what the ‘Saturday Night Genealogy Fun’ blogging challenge is for this week.

It’s Saturday Night again –Time for some more Genealogy Fun!!


Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music):
1) Many of our ancestors migrated to a distant place.  Which one of your ancestors migrated the furthest?  Or the furthest in North America?  It could be in one big move, or in several smaller moves over their lifetime.  How far did they travel?  Do you know the route they took?

Thinking about these questions and my tree, I don’t have ancestors that traveled long distances across the United States. Since all of my second great grandparents settled in Kansas, my ancestors didn’t even migrate clear across the country.

Pedigree chart created in RootsMagic 8 (Preview) with color coding enabled

Thus, I have to turn to my immigrant ancestors to find the one who traveled the farthest. And I have to admit that I haven’t done much research of my immigrant ancestors. My tree can be divided into those ancestors who are included in published genealogies and those who are proving to be difficult to research in the pre-1850 records.

Since many of my lines came from England or Scotland, their distance of travel is similar. The branch of my tree that I think may have migrated the furthest is also one with a very interesting travel story: my Briles (Broils, Broyles, Breuel) line.

My ancestor, Johannes Breuel, his wife, Urusla Ruop, and children Jacob, Conrad and Elisabetha have all been identified as members of the Second Germanna Colony. Compared to other immigrant ancestors in my tree, their story is unique.

The We Relate web site includes the following information about the Second Germanna colony.

Second Germanna: Later, in 1717, a shipful of German immigrants bound for Pennsylvania, landed in Virginia with approximately 70 persons, and this second group of settlers (called “The Second Germanna Colony” or “New German Town”) arrived in Germanna (about 2 miles away from the First Colony at the fork of the Rapidan and Rappahannock Rivers, i.e. – “The Great Fork”) in the beginning of 1718. Whether their ship landed in Virginia due to weather (the Captain’s claim) or due to collusion (between Spotswood, his associates and the Captain) is not clear. This second group, was put to work by Spotswood in “naval stores” and were not involved in the iron mines. They were placed on 13,000 acres of land which Lt. Gov. Spotswood and Robert Beverley (and other partners), who needed settlers to move onto the land to lay claim to it. Since their transportation was paid for by these partners, they became indentured servants and were bound to locate to that area. This group of German immigrants, who originated from the Baden, Württemberg, Heidelberg and Neckar regions of Germany and Switzerland, was Lutheran by religion.

https://www.werelate.org/wiki/Germanna_Colony

The ‘Second Germanna Colony‘ page on the Alexander Spotswood website tells a slightly different version of their story.

The Germanna Second Colony, unlike the Germanna First Colony, did not come to Virginia of their own free will.  Their ship’s captain, Andrew Tarbett, had  promised to take them to Pennsylvania – where we believe their friends and families were headed — on his ship Scott.  But Tarbett had gambled away their passage money in London.  He knew that the Lieutenant Governor Alexander Spotswood in Virginia would pay the costs of their journey if the Germans were delivered to Virginia, as Spotswood was willing to pay to increase the supply of hard workers in his colony.  Captain Tarbett pretended that the Scott was blown off course and “accidentally” arrived in Virginia where he delivered his passengers to Spotswood.

http://alexanderspotswood.com/second_germanna_colony.html

The Germanna Second Colony‘s version of their story is similar to that posted on the Alexander Spotswood site:

The Second Colony, in contrast, came from the Palatinate and the Kraichgau area of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Its members did not come voluntarily to Virginia. These families expected to go to Pennsylvania with other Germans, but their ship’s captain, Andrew Tarbett, had been incarcerated in London for debt, and their money was used up while they waited. Tarbett must have known that Governor Spotswood was willing to pay the passage for another group of Germans, for when he got out of debtor’s prison, he transported these Germans on his ship, the Scott, to Virginia, pretending to be blown off course in a storm. There, lost and penniless, they became indentured servants to Spotswood.

http://secondcolony.org/thestory.html

According to the list of second colony members on the Germanna website, Johannes Breuel came from the area of Otisheim, Wurttemberg, Germany. According to Google Maps, Otisheim is almost straight north of Zurich Switzerland and northwest of Stuttgart, Germany.

The Breuel family likely migrated up the Rhine River. If so, they left Europe at Rotterdam to arrive in London before boarding the ship for the Americas.

Thus, my line that likely migrated the furthest also has one of the most interesting migration stories.

Thresher

As you go thru your old photos, do you ever find some that need more of a story to go with them? That’s my case with photos my grandmother handed down of my grandfather’s threshing machine. Unfortunately, my grandfather didn’t live to tell me stories of his very interesting life and I didn’t get many details about the thresher from my grandmother.

Based on the photos, my grandfather operated two different threshers. One was horse driven and the other was steam driven.

Edward Osmund Briles’ horse drawn thresher
Edward Briles’ steam engine thresher and automobile
Edward Briles and wife Pauline on steam engine thresher

To try and learn more about my grandfather and his threshers, I turned to Kansas newspapers. Since my grandfather lived near Crandall and Vernon, Kansas at the time, I searched both Coffey county and Woodson county newspapers.

The article, “Little Threshers Doing the Business” in the 10 Jul 1919 issue of The Daily Republican from Burlington Kansas helps date the transition from horse drawn to steam driven threshers.

Little Threshers Doing the Business

The small threshing machines which were sold this summer to groups of farmers around Burlington are proving successful. These threshers are pulled by tractor engines which any of the farmers own and use for other purposes. Many of the tractors were sold along with the threshers.

Some doubt has been expressed as to whether or not the small machines would handle the heavy straw this summer and also whether or not there would be enough power in some of the smaller tractor engines to pull the machines when handling the long straw but Mr. Sherwood, manager of the Burlington Hardware Co., which concern has sold about 40 of the machines stated this morning that the machines were working in full force threshing from 500 to 500 bushels a day depending on their size and that no difficulty has been experienced by the heavy straw. in most instances the small threshers were bought by groups of 4 or 5 farmers who have wheat land in the same neighborhood. One of the machines is now in operation at the Mike Russell farm, one at Robert King’s, one at L. K. Prokop and one on the John Kennedy farm. All are doing first class work. Other machines are scattered over the county. Mr. Sherwood predicts that eventually a large part of the wheat will be threshed by smaller community owned machines.

Details about my grandfather’s threshing machine are sketchy, but local news items do indicate that he ran a threshing machine.

There are two threshing machines in this neighborhood. Osmond Briles is threshing for Mrs. L. E. Crandall and Ira Edwards for Jess Lippe.

“Crandall,” LeRoy Reporter (LeRoy, Kansas), 19 Sep 1919, page 8, digital images available on Newspapers.com

The 6 Jul 1923 issue of The Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas) indicates that Osmond and his brother Glenn Briles were threshing in the Vernon area.

Vernon News

Osmond and Glenn Briles expect to begin threshing sometime this week.

“Vernon News,” The Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas), 6 Jul 1928, page 8 available on Newspapers.com.

The role of the women in the family during threshing season are mentioned in the 3 Aug 1923 issue of The Yates Center News.

Vernon Items

Orean Briles helped Mrs. Glenn Briles cook for threshers one day last week.

Mrs. Jud Cope and Mrs. Earl Smith helped Mrs. E. G. Briles cook for threshers Friday and Saturday.

“Vernon Items,” The Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Aug 1923, page 8 available on Newspapers.com

Another mention was found in the 15 Jan 1925 issue of The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas).

Vernon Gossip

Osmond Briles is threshing in our neighborhood this week.

“Vernon Gossip,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas) 15 Jan 1925, page 1 available on Newspapers.com

An article in the 18 Jul 1929 issue of The Neosho Falls Post indicates that Osmond Briles owned two threshing machines.

Working Hard to Save the Wheat Crop

Osmond Briles has had both of his threshing machines running almost continually to save the wheat crop in the bottom farms. He reported Wednesday morning that almost all of the wheat on the south side of the river had been threshed. In many instances it was necessary to pull the machine thru water several feet deep to get to the fields. Altho no rain has fallen here for over a week the river has continued to rise slowly.

“Working Hard to Save the Wheat Crop,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 18 Jul 1919, page 3 available on Newspapers.com

The last mention I could find of Osmond Briles’ threshing career was in the 3 Jul 1930 issue of The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas).

Philmore Items

Osmond Briles threshed wheat for C. R. Grant on the E. B. Moore farm Saturday. We were informed that the wheat yielded well and was a good quality.

“Philmore Items,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 3 Jul 1930, page 4 available on Newspapers.com.

These newspaper articles provide another glimpse into the business life of my grandfather, Edward Osmond Briles.

Marion Richmond Crawford

Marion Richmond Crawford was born on 24 Oct 1895 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.15

He was the child of Judson Foster Crawford and Josie Winifred Hammond.1,3

He lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 1 Jul 1900.6 Marian Crawfod was listed on the 1900 census as the son of J. F. Crawford. According to the census, he was born Oct 1895 in Kansas and was 4 years old at the time.

Marion lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 1 Jul 1905.7 Marian Crawford was listed on the 1905 Kansas census in the household of J. F. Crawford. According to the census, he was 9 years old.

He lived at 2nd Ward in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 28 Apr 1910.8 Marion Crawford was listed on the 1910 census as the son of J. F. Crawford. According to the census, he was 14 years old and born in Kansas.

He lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 1 Jul 1915.9 Marion Crawford was listed on the 1915 Kansas census as a 19 year old male living in the household of J. F. Crawford in Dodge City, Kansas.

Marion was recruited by the Dodge City recruiting office to serve in the coastal artillery and sent to on 20 Apr 1917 in Ft. Logan, Colorado.10

Two Recruits a Day
Dodge City Office Has Sent 44 Men to Army Since April 1
The Dodge City recruiting office is maintaining an average of two recruits a day, and this morning it made up for several dull days by sending seven men to Ft Logan to be distributed to their respective departments in the army. John M. Lesch was assigned to the cavalry and the following joined the coast artillery: Cecil R. Campbell, Alfred B. Cramer, Joshia B. Owings, John J. Wiseman, Marion R. Crawford, Homer R. Sharp. Forty-four Men have enlisted at the Dodge City station since April 1.

He  enlisted in U. S. Army serving with Battery D of the 13th Field Artillery on 23 Apr 1917 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.3,11

In Jun 1917, he was honored by the Methodist Sunday School for serving in the U.S. military in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.12


Methodists Honor Soldiers
Twenty-three Members of Methodist Class Have Gone to Colors
The Methodist Sunday School will pay a tribute tomorrow to the men who have gone from its ranks to the service of their country. Twenty-three Dodge City boys have joined the army or the national guards, all formerly members of the Sunday School. With one exception the men were in the class taught by E. C. Bill.
The honor roll will be unveiled tomorrow in connection with the children’s day program which will consist of flag drills and a patriotic service. Persons attending the services are requested to bring a bouquet of flowers to place upon the roll of volunteers.
The following members of the Sunday School have enrolled in the U. S. fighting service: Don Yandell, Raymond Walters, Force Hobble, Clifford Stone, Harold Stone, John Lighter, Ullin Nickerson, Thomas Neal, James Madison, Marion Crawford, Leon Crawford, Lee Elliot, Fred Bill, Earl Henderson, Austin Tuck, Charles W. Truby, Clyde Orebaugh, Frank Arrington, Cress Evans, Earl Evans, Robert Reeves, Elwood Pendleton and Harry Leatherwood.

In Jan 1918, Marion served in the military in Bat. D, 14th F. A., at Ft. Bliss, Texas13

Where Soldiers of Ford County Are
C. E. Smith Has Helped to Revise List of Ford County Men in Military Service
What is perhaps the most complete list of Ford county soldiers that has been made here, has just been prepared by Clyde E. Smith. Mr. Smith was asked by the local chapter of the Red Cross to mail to all of the Ford county soldiers some printed information that was available regarding the insurance which the government is offering to the men in the army. It was not known which of the Ford county men had taken advantage of the government insurance, so in order to get one of the letters to every man that could be reached Mr. Smith made a special effort to get as complete a mailing list as possible.
The letters urging the boys to take advantage of the government insurance were forwarded to the following soldiers:
Leon Crawford, 14th Co., Anti-Aircraft Bat. of San Francisco, American Expeditionary Forces, via New York
Marion Crawford, Bat. D, 14th F. A., Ft. Bliss, Texas

He served in the military with Battery D of the 13th Field Artillery in 1918 and was stationed  in Camp Green, Charlotte, North Carolina.3

He  fought in the Battle of the Argonne Forest as a member of the 13th Field Artillery in Aug 1918 in France.3,14

Had Been at Front 14 Days
Marion Crawford, also a son of Mrs. J. F. Crawford here, writes under date of August 14 that he is in good health and feeling fine. Private Crawford is a member of Battery D, 13th Field Artillery, France. Among other things, he says:
“Cecil Campbell came back to the battery a few days ago but I don’t think his folks know where he is, so if you see any of them you can tell them. How is everyone at home? I have seen several anti-aircraft battalion men around here recently, but I haven’t had a chance to talk to any of them so I don’t know whether Leon is near here or not.”
Private Crawford goes on to say that letter writing is done under difficulties in his camp — a mess kit was his desk, he says. Letters also must be finished before dark, as no lights are allowed.
“Our battery so far has been successful in dodging shells,” he writes, “but were often exposed while hauling shells to the guns. We have been on the front since August 1 and haven’t lost a man yet, but I guess we are lucky, although some batteries have been here four months without losing a man.”

On 18 Jul 1919, Marion set sail aboard the U.S.S. Zeelandia from Brest, Bretagne, France.15

He served in the military arrived back in the United States after serving in France during World War I on 31 Jul 1919.11

He  ended military service on 6 Aug 1919 in Iowa, United States having .11,1617 Marion Crawford served as Private 1st Class; Bat. D 13 F.A.

Marion arrived home from military service on 14 Aug 1919 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.18

Three More Boys Arrive
Marion Crawford, Homer, Sharp and Cecil Campbell, members of the Fourth division of the regular army, recently returned home after having been discharged from Camp Grant. They all enlisted in 1917 and have been overseas for several months. They served with the army of occupation in Germany, and previous to the signing of the armistice they saw much hard fighting in some of the severest engagements of the war. Mr. Campbell returned a day or two before the others, having returned as a casual.

He boarded at 504 av G in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in 1920 and was employed as a switchman for the AT&SF Railway.1921 Marion Crawford was listed as a 23 year old son of Judson F. Crawford on the 1920 Ford County, Kansas census. The family was living at 504 Ave G in Dodge City, Kansas. Marion Crawford was employed as a switchman for the railroad in 1920.

He was a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.3

Marion was a member of the Brotherhood of Switchmen in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.3

He died when he fell under the wheels of an oncoming switch engine on 29 Jul 1920 at the age of 24 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.1,35,2225

Injury Fatal to M. R. Crawford
Death This Morning Follows Accident

Young Man Missed Footing when
Attempting to Mount Switch Engine
and Fell Beneath Wheels –
One Leg Severed and the Other
Amputated by Physicians

Marion R. Crawford, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Crawford, 504 Avenue D, was fatally injured early Thursday morning about 2:30 when attempting to step upon the back of an oncoming switch engine. He accidentally missed his footing and fell under the wheels. One of his legs was cut off next to the hip and the other was so badly mangled as to make amputation necessary.
It was necessary to jack the rear of the engine in order to keep from running over the boy a second time. As soon as this was accomplished he was taken to the McCarty hospital with all possible speed, where everything that could possibly be done was performed to save the young man’s life. He remained unconscious almost to the time of his death, which occurred at 8:30 this morning.
Marion R. Crawford was born in Dodge City October 24, 1895. He was well known here, having lived practically his entire life in the community. During the war he enlisted in the army, serving with Battery D, of the 13th Field Artillery, stationed at Camp Green, Charlotte, North Carolina. He was overseas and fought for his country in the Argonne, afterwards serving with the army of occupation. Marion Crawford was quiet, reserved and had a host of friends in Dodge City. After returning from the army he obtained a position with the Santa Fe railroad as switchman, and it was at this job that he was working when the accident happened. He was a member of the A.O.U.W. in good standing and also a member of the Brotherhood of Switchmen.
He is survived by his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Crawford, four married sisters, Mrs. Bernice Allen, of Cimarron, Mrs. Russell Horton of Dodge City, Esther and Lois Crawford and two brothers, Leon and High. His grandmother, Mrs. Mary Crawford, also lives in Dodge City, and Nelson Crawford, an uncle is an employee in the post office.
The funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

He was buried at Maple Grove Cemetery in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.4,2627

ENDNOTES:

        1. Crawford, Judson F., Judson F. Crawford Family Bible (n.p.: , n.d.); Marcia Philbrick, Seneca, KS, photocopy in Crawford.Washington.Notebook

        2. “Injury Fatal to M. R. Crawford”, Dodge City Journal, (Dodge City Kansas), 29 July 1920, p. 1 col. 1; Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS.

        3. “Injury Fatal to M. R. Crawford,” The Dodge City Kansas Journal (Dodge City, Kansas), 29 July 1920, page 1; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 8 August 2021).

        4. Tombstone, Maple Grove Cemetery, Dodge City Kansas read by Marcia Philbrick, 1996, Marion R. Crawford tombstone (Crawford.KS.153)

        5. Marion Richmond Crawford, death certificate (Standard Certificate of Death) 229 220 (29 July 1920), Kansas State Board of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Topeka, Kansas.

        6. 1900 U.S.Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, ED 49, Sheet 18A Image 35 of 42, household 383, Crawford J F; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA T623

        7. 1905 Kansas State Census, Ford County, Kansas, Kansas State Census, , page 42 Image 83 of 178, household 291, J F Crawford; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); Kansas State Historical Society

        8. 1910 U.S. Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kanass, ED 45, Sheet 3B Image 6 of 30, household 16, Crawford JF; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T624

        9. 1915 Kansas State Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, page 2 Image 73 of 279, household 9, Crawford J F; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); Kansas State Historical Society

        10. “Two Recruits a Day,” The Dodge City Daily Globe (Dodge City, Kansas), 20 April 1917, page 1; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 15 August 2021).

        11. Extract from Discharge Certificate of Enlisted Man to Secure Vitory Medal, Marion R. Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford.

        12. “Methodists Honor Soldiers,” The Dodge City Daily Globe (Dodge City, Kansas), 9 June 1917, page 1; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 15 August 2021).

        13. “Where Soldiers of Ford County Are,” The Dodge City Daily Globe (Dodge City, Kansas), 28 January 1918, page 1; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 15 August 2021).

        14. “Had Been at Front 14 Days,” The Dodge City Daily Globe (Dodge City, Kansas), 16 September 1918, page 1; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 16 August 2021).

        15. Lists of Incoming Passengers, 1917-1938; Lists of OUtgoing Passengers, 1917-1938, database with images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com : ).

        16. Enlistment Record for Marion R. Crawford, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford.

        17. Honorable Discharge from the United States Army, Marion R. Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford.

        18. “Three More Boys Arrive,” The Dodge City Daily Globe (Dodge City, Kansas), 14 August 1919, page 1; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 16 August 2021).

        19. 1920 U.S. Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, ED 53, Sheet 7B Image 14 of 22, dwelling 161, Crawford Judson F; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T625

        20. Etrick’s Directory of Ford County 1920 (Dodge City, Kansas: Etrick Printery, 1920), page 26, Crawford; digital image, Heritage Quest (interactive.ancestryheritagequest.com : viewedonline September 2016).

        21. Etrick’s Directory of Ford County 1920 (Dodge City, Kansas: Etric Printery, 1920), page 49, Crawford J F; digital image, Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 18 August 2021).

        22. Hulpieu Swaim Funeral Home Records [Dodge City, Kansas] (: ), 1921-1926  (Crawford.KS.075)

        23. Find a Grave, database and images, Find a Grave (www.findagrave.com : viewed online 8 August 2021), memorial for Marion Richmond Crawford (1895-1920), Find a Grave Memorial no. #110357859, created by Marcia Philbrick, citing Maple Grove Cemetery, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas; accompanying photograph by Tim Tompkins, Marion Richmond Crawford.

        24. “Under Engine an Hour,” The Hutchinson News (Hutchinson, Kansas), 2 August 1920, page 15; Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 8 August 2021).

        25. “Dodge City Switchman Killed Under Engine,” The Hutchinson Gazette (Hutchinson, Kansas), 31 July 1920, page 7; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 8 August 2021).

        26. Computer Printout for Maple Grove Cemetery (Dodge City, KS: Dodge City, Kansas, 5/29/1985), Record #:  lot 1 block 95 section 3 (Crawford.KS.080)

        27. Find a Grave, database and images, Find a Grave (www.findagrave.com : viewed online August 2017), memorial for Marion Richmond Crawford (1895-1920), Find a Grave Memorial no. #110357859,