Saturday Night Genealogy Fun

Here is your assignment, should you decide to accept it (you ARE reading this, so I assume that you really want to play along – cue the Mission Impossible music!):

1)  Almost  all of us have genealogy software that we use to manage our research and our family tree.  Some researchers use only an online family tree.  What do you use?

2)  For this week’s SNGF, tell us how many “trees” (or “bushes)” you have in your genealogy management program database.  How did you figure it out?  Also, where do you have online trees?

My first genealogy software program was PAF (Personal Ancestral File). I migrated from PAF to The Master Genealogist (TMG) because of TMG’s ability to document sources. When TMG was no longer supported, I experimented with several programs before choosing RootsMagic.

I am currently using RootsMagic 7. In RM7, I can count how many trees I have in my file by pulling down the TOOLS menu and selecting COUNT TREES.

Before revealing how many trees I have in my file, I need to issue a disclaimer. I tend to research FAN (friends, associates and neighbors) clubs. I have also tended to research people of the same name that might be the same person. I treat my RM7 file as a database — a place to store information. Thus, I am sure that I have lots of trees in my file.

So, how many ‘trees’ do I have in my database? Let’s just say I have a lot! Could some of them connect to other trees in my database? That is highly likely. At some point, I probably need to do some investigating to see if I can merge individuals and thus merge one tree into another.

For example, I have data on several different James Crawford families from early Kentucky. I also have data on some of the descendants of Alexander and Mary (McPheeters) Crawford. In both cases, the data is in my file so that I can separate out the various Crawford families. The same is true for other lines. For example, I have information on the family of Col. James Curry of Ohio because I think he might connect to my ancestor, Hiram Currey.

I used RootsMagic’s TreeShare feature to upload my file to Ancestry. When I did the initial upload, I excluded living people, but uploaded everyone else. Thus, all of those different trees were uploaded to Ancestry and are considered ‘floating’ trees.

I also have my data on MyHeritage, FamilyTree DNA and GedMatch. For those trees, I created a gedcom file and uploaded that file. My tree on MyHeritage contains the Crawford/McPheeters data while my tree on FamilyTreeDNA does not. My tree on FamilyTreeDNA only contains my ancestors. However, my GedCom file on GedMatch contains my ancestors and the descendants I had at the time I uploaded the file.

Currently, RootsMagic offers the ability to have a free website containing my RootsMagic data. Thus, I have my file (excluding living) online using this resource.

Another location where I share data from my tree(s), is FamilySearch. I utilize RootsMagic’s ability to connect to individuals on the FamilySearch tree. I am slowly working on adding sourcing and pictures that are in my collection to the FamilySearch tree. In 2017, I submitted my data to FamilySearch Genealogies. The file is named Heartland_Genealogy_2017 and was submitted under the name Marcia Philbrick.

Another place that I have information about my ancestors is this blog site. I often create posts that transcribe documents in my collection. Other posts are created using RootsMagic’s ability to produce a narrative report complete with citations. Although not an actual tree, my blog contains lots of information about the people in my RootsMagic file – including people that don’t connect to my ancestral tree.

Even though I have data online, the most current copy of my work is my RootsMagic file.

I realize that there are other sites where I could have a tree. However, I am concentrating on Ancestry, FamilySearch and sites where I have DNA data.

Mothers in My Tree

#52Ancestors #MothersDay

(Maiden names are being used)

(3) My Mom

  • Four children
  • 1 died infancy

(5) Winnie Letha Currey

  • Three children
  • 1 died in infancy
  • 1 died as a young adult prior to marriage

(7) Pauline Mentzer

  • Five children
  • 1 died around 9 months

(9) Josie Winifred Hammond

  • Seven children
  • 3 boys and 4 girls

(11) Winnie Mae Hutchinson

  • Nine children
  • one baby only lived a month
  • a second baby lived about 5 months
  • son, Henry Currey, died at age 13
  • Winnie died in 1913, leaving Herbert 18, Myrtle 14, Mary 12, Winnie 10, Earnest 7, and Alma 1 1/2
  • Total of 5 boys, 4 girls with 2 boys and 4 girls in 1913 when their mother died

(13) Frances Artlissa “Artie” Ricketts

  • Four children
  • 2 boys and 2 girls

(15) Nettie Adell Wells

  • Five children
  • 3 boys and 2 girls

(17) Mary Foster

  • Five children
  • 2 boys and 3 girls

(19) Sarah Ellen Ralston

  • Hammond Genealogy say 9 children
  • No documentation of first three children: William R. R. Hammond b 1864 and Homer L. Hammond b 1865 and Judson F. E. Hammond b 1866 found at this time
  • First three children have birth dates prior to her marriage
  • A fourth child, Glenn M. Hammond, is listed in the Hammond Genealogy. This child only lived one year. No other documentation found to date
  • Five documented children
  • 2 boys and 3 girls

(21) Angelina Jane Burke

  • Ten children
  • 6 boys and 4 girls

(23) Julia Harding

  • Eleven Children
  • Death dates currently unknown on 4 of the children: Frederick b1867, Cary b1869, Francesca b1879 and Elvira b 1884
  • 7 boys and 4 girls with 4 boys and 3 girls reaching adulthood

(25) Sarah Jane Thompson

  • Two children
  • 1 boy and 1 girl

(27) Rachel Elmeda Christy

  • Eight children
  • Set of twins did not survive. One died when almost one month old and the other died when a little over 3 months old.
  • 2 boys and 6 girls with 2 boys and 4 girls surviving to adulthood

(29) Emeline Minnick

  • Eight children
  • 6 boys and 2 girls

(31) Salome Adell Crandall

  • Four children
  • A boy, Freddie, lived about 7 years
  • A girl, Mary, lived about 9 months
  • Two girls survived to adulthood and married brothers

1915 Pension

Not only are marriage records one of the treasures found in military pension files, but so are names and birthdates of the children. Below is a transcription of a 1915 affidavit submitted by James M Ricketts as part of his pension applications.

Department of the Interior
Bureau of Pensions

Sir: Please answer, at your earliest convenience he questions enumerated below. This information is requested for future use, and it may be of great value to your widow or children. Use the inclosed envelope, which requires no stamps.
Very Respectfully
G M Sltz[aberg]

James M Ricketts
Vernon Kansas
361910 Act May

No. 1. Date and place of birth? Answer. Clinton CO. Ind
The name of organizations in which you served? Answer. Co K 7 Indiana Calvry

No. 2. What was your post office at enlistment? Answer. Burlin Clinton Co. Ind

No. 3. State your wife’s full name and her maiden name. Answer. Rachel Elmeda Christy – Ricketts

No. 4. When, where nd by whom were you married? Answer July the 12th 1866 Dr. Gosset

No. 5.Is there any official or church record of your marriage? __ If so, where? Answer. The official record, should be at Frankfort Ind

No. 6. Were you previously married? If so, state the name of your former wife, the date of the marriage, and the date and place of her death or divorce. If there was more than one previous marriage, let you answer include all former wives. Answer. No.

No. 7. If your present wife was married before her marriage to you, state the name of her former husband, the date of such marriage, and the date and place of his death or divorce, and state whether he ever rendered any military or naval service, and if so, given name of the organization in which he served. If she was married more than once before her marriage to you, let your answer include all former husbands. Answer. Never married before

No. 8. Are you now living with your wife, or has there been a separation? Answer. Living together yet

No. 9. State the names and dates of birth of all your children, living or dead. Answer
Francis Artliissa Born 1868 Apr 7th
Hulda May Born Apr 24th 1870
Annabelle “ Nov the 9th 1871
Dasie Pearl “ July the 29 1873
Manford “ March the 17 1875
Charles “ June the 17 1877
Dor& Mini born Oct the 7 1880 diseased in year 1881

Date April 3 1915

(Signature) James M. Ricketts

40th Parallel

We often see the words “In the beginning” when reading a book, fairy tale or the Bible. However, have you ever thought of a place as a beginning? When we think of place in our genealogy research, there is always someplace ‘before’. It may be one of our brick walls and we don’t know where it is, but we do know there is a ‘before’.

Thus, to say that my husband and I took a road trip to the “Place of Beginning” seems really strange. Most of the land found in the states of Kansas and Nebraska was part of the Louisiana Purchase. However, it was the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act that set this area on the road to statehood. This act also established the 40th parallel as the boundary line between Kansas and Nebraska.

The passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act prompted surveying to define the beginning points for establishing the ranges, townships and sections. Since we had recently visited the Point of Beginning – or the 6th Prime Merdian marker to our West, we decided to visit the monument marking the 40th parallel on the Missouri River Bluffs. This marker was established in 1855 to mark the Kansas Nebraska border.

Additional Information

Ricketts Marriage

Have you tried to obtain the military pension record for any of your ancestors? If so, did you discover a marriage license buried in those documents?

That is the case for many of my civil war ancestors’ pension files, including that of James Marshall Ricketts.

Marriage License – Clinton County, IN
Found in Book 4:489


James M. Ricketts
to
Rachel E Christy
Be it Remembered that in this 7th

day of July 1866, the following

marriage license was issued, to wit:


State of Indiana, to-wit: Clinton County
All Who Shall see These Presents, — Greeting:
[?] Ye, That any person legally authorized to solemnize matrimony, is hereby licensed to join in
[?] as Husband an Wife Mr. James M. Ricketts and
Miss Rachel E. Christy and for so doing, this shall be his sufficient authority.
In Testimony Whereof, I Daniel P. Barnes, Clerk of the Clinton Circuit Court, hereunto
subscribe my name, and affix the seal of said court, this 7th day of July
1866
Daniel P. Barnes, Clerk
[Be] it Further Remembered, that on this 6th day of August 1866
[follo]wing certificate was filed in my office, to-wit:
[S]tate of Indiana, to-wit: Clinton County
[This] certifies that I joined in Marriage, as husband and wife, Mr. James M. RIcketts
Miss Rachel E. Christy on the 12th day of July 1866
James M. Go[sett], Minister
[?] and recorded
David P. Barnes, Clerk

Ricketts Military Service

The following documents are from the pension record for James Marshall Ricketts of Indiana and Kansas.

Executive Department of Indiana
Adjutant General’s Office
June 3, [1981]
Indianapolis
This certifies, that the official records of which I am the lawful custodian on file in this office show that James M. Ricketts
joined for duty and was enrolled as a Private of Company I, 119th 7 Cavalry
Regiment Indiana Volunteers at Indianapolis, Indiana on
the 18th day of August 1863, by Lt. Sahm
and that he was duly mustered into the Military
Service of the United States at Indianapolis, Indiana on the 11th
day of September 1863, for the term of three (3) years by
Captain Miller Mustering Officer
Age: 18
Mustered out at Hempstead, Texas on September 19, 1865
This Certificate is given as official evidence of enlistment, service, and
mustered out of James M. Ricketts of
Company K 119th 7 Cavalry Regiment Indiana Volunteers
Witness my hand and official seal
Alfred F. Ahner
Adjutant General, Indiana
State of Indiana
Commission on Public Records
For the Director
Debbie S. Dwenger
Archives Division

Adjutant General’s Office
Washington, D. C. Nov 26, 1870
Sir
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt from your Office
of application for Pension No. 155503, and to return it
herewith, with such information as is furnished by the files of this
Office.
It appears from the Rolls on file in this Office that
James M. Ricketts was enrolled on the 18
day of Aug 1863 at Indianapolis in Co. K
7 Regiment of Ind Cav Volunteers to
serve 3 years or during the war, and mustered into
service as a Privt on the 11 day of Sept
1863 at Indianapolis, in Co K 7
Regiment of Ind Cav Volunteers to serve 3
years or during the war. On the Muster Roll of Co. K
of that Regiment for the months of Nov. an Dec.
1863 he is reported Sick in Hospital at Memphis
Tenn (date not stated) Present on all sub
rolls of Co to Aug 31/65 Mustered out
on detachment Muster out roll Sep 19/65
at Hempstead Tex as a Corpl


Certificate of Service
To all Whom it May Concern:
This is to Certify, that James m. Ricketts who was enrolled
on the 18 a of August one thousand eight hundred & sixty-three to
serve three years was Discharged on the 19 day of September 1865
with detachment at Hempstead, Texas, while holding
the grade of Corporal in Co K 7 Regiment of
Indiana Cavalry Volunteers
This Certificate is given upon evidence that the original discharge has been lost or destroyed
and in all cases upon the condition imposed by the Act of Congress approved March 3, 1873,
that it shall not be accepted as a voucher for the payment of any claim against the United States
for pay, bounty or other allowance, or as evidence in any other case.”
Given at the War Department, Washington, D.C. this 21 day of
February A.D. 1893

By authority of the Secretary of War
T C Ainswortjh
Colonel, U.S. Army
Chief, Record & Pension Office

358653

My Germanna Connection

Do you have a surname that has changed over time in your family tree? I’m sure that I have several, but the one that sometimes confuses people is my Briles line. It is this line that connects me to the Second Germanna Colony in Virginia. My ancestor Conrad Briles (Broil, Broils) was the son of John Broyles (Johann Breuel). The booklet, Before Germana: The Ancestry of the Broyles, Paulitz Moyer and Motz Families outlines the various surname spellings.

The Broyles surname is spelled differently in American and German records. It is most consistently spelled Breyhel and Breuel in German parish registers. Its variations in American records include Broil, Boil, Briles and Bryol, to list a few.

Before Germana: The Ancestry of the Broyles … Families

The immigrant, John Broyles, had six children: Hans Jacob, Mattheus, Conrad, Jerg Martin, Maria Elisabetha and Catherine. It is Conrad’s line that takes on the BRILES spelling of the surname after Conrad moves to Randolph County, North Carolina. The entry for Conrad in the Keith Transcript discusses this spelling transition.

3. Conrad Broyles (son of John Broyles, 1) was born in Germany and brought to this country in 1717. He was still under age in 1727. He died in Randolph Co., North Carolina, in the latter part of 1784. In the Virginia records his name is spelled Broil or Broyl. In his will his name is once given as Broil but is signed as Briles. His children are also called Brile. In later years his descendants have generally used the spelling Briles.

Keith, Arthur Leslie. The Broyles Family. Volume I, page 13.

So starting with my grandfather, Edward Osmund Briles, my lineage back to the Germanna colonies is as follows:

(1) Edward Osmond Briles (1891-1956) married Pauline Edith Mentzer in 1915.

(2) Edward Grant Briles (1869-1951) married Frances Artlissa Ricketts in 1890.

(4) Noah Washington Briles (1840-1879) married Sarah Jane Thompson in 1866.

(8) Alexander Briles (1817-1900) married Sarah Rush in 1836. Alexander left North Carolina about 1858 to settle in what would become Coffey County, Kansas.

(16) John Briles (1775-1855) married Nancy Ann Beckerdite

(32) Frederick Briles (abt 1744-1815). According to the FamilySearch tree, his wife was Mary Goodrich, but I haven’t verified this information.

(64) Conrad Broyles (Broil, Brile) (1709-1784). According to the FamilySearch tree, Conrad married Margaret Rausch in 1730 in Madison County, Virginia. I do not have a source for this marriage at this time.

(128) John Broyles (Johannes Breuel) (1670 – abt 1734) married Ursula Ruop in 1703 in Wuerttemberg, Germany. John, Ursula and their children were part of the second colony of Germanna.

Even though the spelling of the surname changed, there appears to be a pattern to the change. My research suggests that the BRILES surname traces back to Randolph County, North Carolina, while the BROYLES surname is found in Tennessee and traces back to Virginia. Both lines descend from our immigrant ancestor, John Broyles (Johannes Breuel).

Additional information about my BRILES ancestors can be found on my Ancestry tree, starting with Edward Osmund Briles. The top menu of this blog also has a page with links to my other ‘online trees‘.

Mom

#SaturdayNightGenealogyFun

Here is your assignment, should you decide to accept it (you ARE reading this, so I assume that you really want to play along – cue the Mission Impossible music!):

1)  Sunday is Mother’s Day in the USA, and usually a time for memories and gratitude to our special birth person.

2)  For this week’s SNGF, tell us some things about your mother that are special and memorable  to you.

This post is a hard one, particularly since I’ve never thought about this before. However, looking back I can describe some special memories.

One of those special memories is of mom playing the piano. She didn’t play often, likely because she didn’t have time to sit down at the piano. Mom had the ability to play the melody with the right hand and just play chords with her right hand. Thus, she could pick up a piece of music and play it beautifully. Christmastime usually included some evening where mom would sit down and play various hymns and carols.

Christmas brings another special ‘mom’ memory. For many years, mom would spend evenings in December making candy. I remember her making fudge, divinity, nougat, peanut brittle, pralines, stuffed dates and caramel pecan roll. This candy was then packaged as gifts. Some would be sent to the homes of her siblings while other packages were shared with neighbors and likely co-workers.

Another special memory is how mom and dad opened their home to my cousin. My cousin’s father was working in Nigeria. While the family had been living in Nigeria, my cousin had reached the age where she had to either go to a boarding school or return to the United States to attend school. My cousin lived with us for a couple of years. My parents weathered the storms of two teenage girls used to being the only girl now thrown into having to share their ‘space’. Even after my cousin’s family was reunited when her parents moved back to Kansas, mom and dad stayed close to her, celebrating her life achievements.

Besides helping me learn to cook, mom was insistent that I acquire two other skills: Typing and sewing. Even though I had taken typing as a 9th grader, mom felt like I needed to improve my skills. Thus, I took a typing class during the summer while in high school. Like the typing issue, mom wanted me to improve my sewing schools. Thus, we took an evening class in tailoring together. Although I don’t sew my own clothes any more, I still use those typing skills — every day!

So how about you? What are some of your ‘mom’ memories?

Criminal

#52Ancestors

This week’s #52Ancestors writing prompt is ‘Crime and Punishment’. When I think about looking for criminal acts in my tree, my first thoughts go to murderers, gun slingers or bank robbers. Since I don’t know of any ties to those types of criminals, I immediately thought of my ancestor who was accused of a ‘white collar’ crime, embezzlement.

Curious as to whether his profile was the only one where the ‘Criminal’ tag was used, I decided to print a “Fact List” report for the ‘Criminal’ tag.

That report pulled up two people: James H. Crawford and Hiram Mirick Currey.

James H. Crawford was the victim of a crime. However, Hiram Mirick Currey was accused of what amounted to embezzlement.

At the time of this accusation, Hiram Mirick Currey was serving as the treasurer of Ohio. The state of Ohio was in a battle with the federal government over states’ rights – over the right of the state to keep national banks out of the state.

In 1819, Ohio passed a law implementing a tax on the National Bank. In September, 1819, Ralph Osborn, the state auditor authorized the seizure of $100,000 from the Chillicothe branch of the United States.

According to the article, Osborn vs Bank of the United States, $120,000 was seized from the Chillicothe branch. These funds were were distributed as follows:

  • $20,000 returned to the National Bank since it was above the amount required to pay the tax
  • $2,000 was used to pay the men who ‘seized’ the tax
  • $98,000 turned over to the Ohio State Treasurer

According to an article in the 26 November 1819 issue of The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) a detailed list of the funds deposited in the Franklin Bank of Columbus.

  • $78,150 in notes of the Bank of the United States payable at their office of discount and deposit in Chillicothe
  • $2,090 in notes of the bank of the United States payable at their office in Philadelphia
  • $3,830 in gold coin
  • $16,000 in silver current coin of the U.S.

These funds totaled $100,070.

We give the following very extraordinary proceeding to the publick without comment.

The president, directors and company of the Franklin Bank of Columbus, John Kerr the president thereof in his official and individual capacity, William Nen cashier of said bank also in his official and private capacity and all other officers and servants of said bank, are hereby notified that the money and notes there lately deposited by Hiram Mirick Currey, as treasurer of Ohio, or in his individual capacity amounting to the sum of $100,070, to wit: 00 $78,150 in notes of the Bank of the United States payable at their office of discount and deposit in Chillicothe; $2090, in notes of the bank of the United States, payable at their office in Philadelphia; $3,830, in gold coin and $16,000 in silver current coin of the U.S. Belong to the president, directors and co. of the bank of the U.S. and were taken by force from the officers or their office of discount and deposit at Chillicothe in whose custody they have been placed by a certain John L. Harper, and by him transported to Columbus and deposited with the above named Hiram Mirrick Currey, either as treasurer of state or in his individual capacity, on or about the 17th day of Sept. last in violation of the annexed injunction issued by the7th circuit court of the U.S. for the Ohio district at their last Sept. session: And ye are hereby required and commanded to deliver over to Nathan Thompson, the treasure above described amounting to the sum of $100,070, who is hereby authorized to receive and receipt the same. And in case the same be not immediately paid over, ye are hereby further notified that proceedings at law will be immediately commenced against all of the as above described to compel the payment thereof with damages and costs.

WM. CREIGHTON, jr. Pres.

A.G. Claypool, Cash, Office Dis. and Deposit Bank of the U.S. at Chillicothe.
Nov. 12, 1819

The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) 26 November 1819. Available on Ancestry.com

In December, 1820, Hiram Currey was accused of owing the State of Ohio $11,111.

Whereas, it appears, by the report of the auditor of state, made to the present general assembly, that Hiram M. Curry, the late treasurer, stands indebted to the state in the sum of $11,111.

The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio). 28 Dec 1820. Available on Ancestry.com

In 1822, the Ohio legislature passed a resolution where Hiram Currey would turn over land to pay off the debt.

Mr. Parish moved a resolution, to authorize the present treasurer to receive from Hiram M. Currey, and his trustee, a conveyance for the real estate of said Currey. Also, to release the securities to the second bond given by said Currey, as treasurer, from the liability, upon payment of the costs of suits now pending against them. Also, to direct the suites against said Currey, and the securities to the first bond giver by said Currey as treasurer of state to be prosecuted to final judgment, &c. Which resolution was laid on table for consideration.

Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio: being the First Session of the Twentieth General Assembly (Columbus, Ohio: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1821), p. 284viewed online December 2017.

This fight between the state of Ohio and the National Bank resulted in a court case titled, Osborn vs Bank of the United States, that went all the way to the Supreme Court.

Trying to track down Hiram Mirick Currey and the details of this case has been a challenge for quite some time. There are still records to be found, but below is what I have compiled to date.

Hiram Mirick Currey

Myrack Curry was listed with 1 white male in the household in Tyrone Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in 1783.2

He was listed on the tax rolls as Mira Hiram Curry in 1786 in Fayette, Pennsylvania, United States.34

In 1790, Hiram was a preacher in the Elkhorn Conference of the Baptist Church in Mays Lick, Mason, Kentucky, United States.5

Miriach Curry was listed on the 1790 Fayette County, Pennsylvania census with 1 free white male and 4 free white females in the household.67

He  resided between 1792 and 1794 in Mays Lick, Mason, Kentucky, United States and was a Baptist preacher and teacher at the first school in Mays Lick.8

He was listed on tax rolls as Hiram Curry with 1 horse and 7 cattle in 1792 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.910

In 1792 Hiram was an admitted as candidate for ministry in Mays Lick, Mason, Kentucky, United States.5

He was listed on the tax rolls owning 200 acres on Stone Lick watercourse of Bull Creek of John Craig’s survey in 1793 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.11

He was witness to to the will of Benjamin Thraikill on 27 Mar 1793 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.12

Hiram was messenger, along with Cornelius Drake, to Elkhorn Baptist Association meeting representing Mays Lick church reporting 9 received by letter, 1 dismissed, 58 members in South Elkhorn, Fayette, Kentucky, United States.13

In 1794, he was a teacher in Mays Lick, Mason, Kentucky, United States.14

He was listed on tax rolls as Hiramirick Curry with 2 white males over 21, with 1 horse and 7 cattle and also listed as Hiram Cury with 100 acres of 2nd rate land on the Johnson watercourse in 1795 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.1517

Hiram was listed on tax rolls as M. Hiram Currey with 100 acres 2nd rate land on the Locust watercouse, 1 male over 21, 2 horses and 4 cattle in 1796 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.1819

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram Mirem Currey with 200 acres of 2nd rate land on Ball Creek Watercourse with 1 male over 21 and 2 horses in 1797 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.2021

He was messenger to Elkhorn Baptist Association meeting along with J. Singleton for Stone Lick Church reporting 42 baptised, 9 received by letter, 3 dismissed and 76 members in Clear Creek, Kentucky.13,22

Hiram  was listed on tax rolls between 1799 and 1801 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.23

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry with 200 acres on Stone Lick Bull Creek with 1 male over 21, 1 male over 16 and 1 horse in 1799 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.24

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry  with 150 acres 3rd rate land on the Stone Lick Watercourse and 1 male over 21 in 1800 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.2528

Hiram sold land being 50 acres of land on Stone Lick Creek that was part of the survey granted to John Craig by patent to James Luston on 30 Dec 1800 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.2930

He baptized Elder John Gutridge in the Ohio River three miles above Maysville in 1801 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.31

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry with 100 acres of 3rd rate land on the Bull Creek Watercourse with 1 male over 21 on 13 May 1801 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.32

Hiram was mentioned in minutes of meeting of Bracken Association of Baptists held on 19 Sep 1801 in Kentucky, United States.33

He performed marriage of Aquilla Denham and Harriet Thompson on 26 Jun 1804 in Adams, Ohio, United States.34

He performed marriage of Phebe Cary and Alexander Reed on 4 Jun 1805 in Franklin, Ohio, United States.35

Hiram was listed on tax rolls in 1806 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.3637

He was on the list of voters in 1806 in Salem Township, Champaign, Ohio, United States.38

He performed marriage of Thomas Morris to Margaret Dawson on 29 Jun 1806 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.39

Hiram was listed on tax roles as Mirach H. Curry in 1807 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.36,4041

He preached at the courthouse on 8 Jan 1807 in Ohio, United States.42

He preached a sermon after the Masonic oration after 22 Jun 1807 in Ohio, United States.43

Hiram held the office of state senator between 1808 and 1811 representing in Champaign, Ohio, United States.44

He performed marriage of John Ross to Margaret Price in 1808 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.39

He performed marriage of George Hunter and Ruth Fitch in 1808 in Urbana Township, Champaign, Ohio, United States.35,39

Hiram was appointed W. M. on a warrant empowering the lodge to hold meetings in Urbana and Springfield alternately in 1809 in Urbana, Champaign, Ohio, United States.45

He was appointed trustee of Miami University on 9 Feb 1809 in Ohio, United States.4647

On 17 Feb 1809, he was a member board of trustees of Miami University in Ohio, United States.48

Hiram officiated at marriage of Mr. George Hunter and Miss Ruth Fitch on 20 Apr 1809 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.49

He performed marriage of Wm H. Fyffe to Maxamilla Petty on 27 Sep 1809 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.39

He  performed marriage of John Thompson to Polly Frankerberger on 20 Nov 1809 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.50

Hiram was a member of the Ohio State Senate from the county of Champaigne.51

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hivans Curry in 1810 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.5253

His election to the Ohio Senate was contested by Alexander McBeth during a hearing in front of the Senate.54

Hiram represented Champaign county on the board of trustees for Miami County, Ohio on 12 Jan 1811 .55

He was a member of the general assembly for the state of Ohio.56

He was listed on the poll books on 8 Oct 1811 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.57

Between 1812 and 1814 in Urbana Township, Champaign, Ohio, United States Hiram was member  serving as Worthy Mason of Harmony Lodge No. 8 in Urbana, Ohio.58

He erected block house on banks of stream in 1812 in Logan, Ohio, United States.59

He was listed as trustee of Miami University on 14 Mar 1812 in Ohio, United States.6061

Hiram was on a ballet as a Republican elector of President and Vice President.62

He held the office of member of Ohio House of Representatives between 1813 and 1814 representing Champaign, Ohio, United States.55

He taught school in old tavern stand referred to as the old George Fithian and John Enoch stand on lot No. 63 about 1816 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.63

Hiram was listed on the tax rolls owning 170 acres in 1816 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.6465

He held the office of Representative from Champaign County, Ohio on 21 Nov 1816.66

He was listed on the tax rolls  in 1817 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.6768

Hiram was appointed state treasurer to replace W. M’Farland who resigned on 3 Jan 1817 in Ohio, United States.6978

He welcomed President Monroe to the Capital [of Ohio] by a neat and appropriate speech in Aug 1817 in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio, United States.7980

He, Treasurer of Ohio, along with Ralph Osborn, Auditor and Jeremiah McLene, Secretary, oversaw improvements in state prison about 1818 in Ohio, United States.8183

Hiram was listed on the tax rolls owning 170 acres of land on Buck Creek in 1818 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.8485

He was listed on the tax rolls owning 170 acres in 2 parcels on Buck Creek in 1819 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.8687

On 17 Sep 1819, he deposited $100,070 in the Franklin Bank of Columbus at Columbus Ohio. These funds were seized by John L. Harper from the Bank of the United States at Chillicothe.88

About on 19 Nov 1819 notice was served on the Auditor and Treasurer of the State of Ohio regarding the seizure of funds from the U.S. Bank in Chillicothe8992

Hiram was named as defendant in bill of injunction signed by C. W. Byrd, District Judge of the United States, in and for the District of Ohio on 22 Nov 1819 in West Union, Ohio.9293

He was summoned to appear in case filed by The United States of America, District of Ohio on 23 Nov 1819 in Chillicothe, Ross, Ohio, United States.92,94

He submitted report to General Assembly of the State of Ohio from office of Treasurer, State of Ohio on 6 Dec 1819 in Ohio,  United States.95

Hiram along with Ralph Osborn, Auditor; and the President and Directors of the Franklin Bank of Columbus were served with a writ of injunction from the Bank of the United States for the recovery of their money on 7 Dec 1819 in Ohio, United States.92,96100

On 21 Dec 1819 he sent letter to Thoms Rotch, Esqr to declare receipt of $5.25 toward tax on Adam Hoops land in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio, United States.101

He held the office of treasurer of the State of Ohio on 24 Dec 1819 in Ohio, United States.102103

About 1820 in Ohio, United States when the case (suit of attachment against Osborn & Harper) came to trial the opposing counsel agreed that an order should be issued to the State treasurer (Hiram M. Curry) that the total tax, plus interest on the specie, should be returned to the Bank. This the treasurer refused to do without a warrant. … He was thereupon placed under nominal arrest by a Federal marshal and all his property, including his keys, was attached.92,104

Hiram was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry, a non-resident, who owned 100 acres of 1st rate land on Buck Creek and 70 acres of 2nd rate land on Buck Creek in 1820 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.87,105

He resigned as treasurer of State of Ohio on 15 Feb 1820 in Ohio, United States.96,106107

He was  named in a bill concerning a memorial from H. M. Curry praying relief on 15 Feb 1820 .107

Hiram was  named in a bill read for th first time on 16 Feb 1820 .107

He was  named in a bill that was read for the second time on 17 Feb 1820 in Ohio, United States.107108

He was  was named in a bill that was discussed in the Ohio Senate’s committee of the whole on 18 Feb 1820 .107

Hiram was  was named in a bill discussed by the Ohio Senate committee of the whole on 21 Feb 1820 in Ohio, United States.107

He was   on 25 Feb 1820 in Ohio, United States.107

During a dispute with the Bank of the US an officer for the state of Ohio seized $98,000 in gold, silver and notes.  This was placed in charge of the State Treasurer, Mr. H. M. Curry.92,109

He was held the office of “late” Treasurer of state before 4 Dec 1820 in Ohio, United States.110

Hiram was accused of owing the State of Ohio $11,111 under a resolution proposed by Mr. Willson and agreed to by the Ohio House of Representatives on 7 Dec 1820.96,111

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry, a non-resident’ owning 100 acres of 1st rate land on Bucks Creek and 70 acres of 2nd rate land on Bucks Creek in 1821 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.87,112

He was  served with a writ of attachment commanding him to return into court a description of every note taken from the U.S. office of discount and deposit on 4 Jan 1821 in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio, United States.96,113114

Hiram was  excused from jury duty on 24 Mar 1821 in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio, United States.115116

He was  named in a memorial praying the state would receive real estate from him for the amount due the state on 27 Dec 1821 in Ohio, United States.117

Resolved by the senate and house of representatives, that a committee of members on the part of the senate, and five members on the part of the house of representatives, be appointed to take into consideration the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, and that they report thereon by bill or otherwise on 15 Jan 1822 in Ohio, United States.118

The senate have agreed to the resolution for appointing a joint committee on the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, with amendments and have appointed a committee of three members on their part on 17 Jan 1822 in Ohio, United States.118

On 18 Jan 1822, The Ohio house took up the resolution for appointing a joint committee on the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, with the amendment made by the senate thereto. in Ohio, United States.119

 Resolved by the senate and house of representatives, that one member on the part of the senate, and two members on the part of the house of representatives, be added to the joint committee appointed to take into consideration the memorial of Hiram M. Currey on 22 Jan 1822,120

 On 23 Jan 1822,  Mr. Parish from the joint committee to whom was referred the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, made the following report – The committee to whom was referred the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, report – That they have had the same under consideration, and after taking into view the value of the property offered, with reference to the amount of defalcation, a majority of this committee are of opinion that it is inexpedient to accede to the proposals of said memorialists. They therefore recommend the adoption of the following resolution– Resolved that the prayer of the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, is unreasonable and ought not to be granted. And on motion to disagree to said resolution, the question was decided in the affirmative. The yeas and nays being required by messrs. Atwater and Simons, were yeas 38, nays 26. 121

On 28 Jan 1822, Mr. Parish moved a resolution, to authorize the present treasurer to receive from Hiram M. Currey, and his trustee, a conveyance for the real estate of said Currey. Also, to release the securities to the second bond given by said Currey, as treasurer, from the liability, upon payment of the costs of suits now pending against them. Also, to direct the suites against said Currey, and the securities to the first bond giver by said Currey as treasurer of state to be prosecuted to final judgment, &c. Which resolution was laid on table for consideration.122

He was named in a resolution authorizing the Treasurer to receive real estate from Hiram M. Curry in Feb 1822 in Ohio, United States.123

In 1828 Hiram  conducted services held by Universalist people in a schoolhouse in Sheffield Township, Tippecanoe, Indiana, United States.124

He was listed as Hiram M. Curry with 1 male 70-80, 1 female under 5, 1 female 5-10, 1 female 15-20 and 1 female 30-40 in Village of Fairfield, Tippecanoe County, Indiana in 1830.125127

In 1830, he was appointed executor of the estate of Lemuel Lane in Franklin, Ohio, United States. 128

Between 1838 and 1839 Hiram was conducted services for Universalist Church in a school house in Sheffield Township, Tippecanoe, Indiana, United States.129130

ENDNOTES:

        1. Indiana, Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011, Amanda M. Thompson, 20 October 1900; database with images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017).

        2. Westmoreland County Pennsylvania 1783 Census Reprinted from Pennsylvania Archives (: Pennsylvania Archives,), p. 17 (Doc. #: Curry.PA.013).

        3. “Pennsylvania, Tax and Exoneration, 1768-1801,” database, Ancestry (Ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017), Mira Hiram Curry.

        4. “County of Fayette – 1786,” Returns of Taxables, Egle William Henry, editor, Pennsylvania Archives, series 3, Vol. 22 (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State Archives, ), p. 608.

        5. The Universal Register of the Baptist Denomination in North America for the Years 1790, 1791, 1792, 1793 and part of 1794 (New York: Arno Press, 1980)

        6. , Heads of Families First Census of the United States: 1790: State of Pennsylvania (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1908), p. 104https://archive.org/stream/headsoffamiliesa08unit#page/n9/mode/2up viewed online December 2017.

        7. 1790 U.S. Census Fayette County Pennsylvania, Fayette County Pennsylvania, population schedule, Bullskin, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, page 60, Curry, Miriach; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 1 August 2020); NARA microfilm publication M637.

        8. Collins, Lewis and Richard H Collins, History of Kentucky (: Genealogy Publishin Com, 1998), p. 564 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.002).

        9. Entry, 1790 to 1824 Tax Lists, 1792 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005), Mason Co. KY; V20-266. Hereinafter cited as Tax List Mason County Kentucky.

        10. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809. Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort.  Film #007834483. Hiram Currey, 1792 [Book]: [Page]; digitized microfilm, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online November 2017.007834483

        11. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky.

        12. Clift, G. Glenn, History of Maysville and Mason Co., KY (Lexington, KY: Translvania Printing Co., 1936), p. 318-319 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.016).

        13. Religion on the American Frontier: The Baptists 1783-1830 (New York: Henry Holt & Co., 1931)

        14. A series of Reminiscential Letters from Daniel Drake, M.D., of Cincinnati, to His Children (Cincinnati: Robert Clarke & Co., 1870)

        15. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky, 1795 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005).

        16. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry, Hyrummirick, 1795; .

        17. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry, Hiram, 1795; .

        18. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky, 1796 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005).

        19. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry M HIram, 28 Apr 1796; .

        20. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky, 1797 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005).

        21. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry, Hiram Mirum, 1797; .

        22. Fowler, Ila Earle, Kentucky Pioneers and Their Descendents (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1967), p. 109.

        23. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky, 1799, 1800, 1801 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005).

        24. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry, HIram M, 1799; .

        25. Clift, Glen, Second Census of Kentucky, 1800 (Frankfort, KY: , 1954), (Doc. #: Curry.KY.001).

        26. “Kentucky, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes ndex, 1810-1890,” database, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017), Hiram M. Curry.

        27. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry HIram M, 19 Mar 1800; .

        28. “Kentucky, Tax Lists 1799-1801,” database online, Genealogy Publishing Company, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 1 August 2020), Hiram M Curry.

        29. Mason County Kentucky Deed Book A-l 1789-1810 Abstracts (Denver: Western Heraldry Org, 1973), p. 97 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.030.

        30. Kentucky, Mason. Deeds, bks. F-G, 1799-1803. Kentucky, Frankfort.  Film #[FilmNumber]. Hiram Mirick Curry to James Luston, 30 Dec 1800 G: 97-98 (image 330-331); digital image, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online November 2017.[FilmNumber]

        31. History of the Miami Baptist Assiciation from Its Organization in 1797 to a Division in that Body on Missions, etc. in the Year 1836 with Short Sketches of Deceased Pastors of this First Association in Ohio (Cincinnati: Geo. S. Blanchard & Co., 1869)

        32. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry Hiram M, 13 May 1801; .

        33. Fowler, Ila Earle, Kentucky Pioneers and Their Descendents (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1967), p. 109 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.003).

        34. A History of Adams County Ohio (West Union Ohio: E. B. Stivers, 1900)

        35. Ohio Vital Records #2 1750-1880 (: Broderbund)

        36. Jackson, Ronald Vern, Gary Ronald Teeples and David Schaefermeyer, editors, Index to Ohio Tax Lists, 1800-1810 (Bountiful, UT: Accelerated Indexing Systems, 1977), p. 96 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.022).

        37. Jackson, Ronald Vern, Gary Ronald Teeples and David Schaefermeyer, editors, Index to Ohio Tax Lists 1800-1810 (Bountiful, Ohio: Accelerated Indexing Systems, Inc., 1977), Curry, H. Merack.

        38. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 318.

        39. Antrim, Joshua, The History of Champaign and Logan Counties from Their First Settlements (Bellefontaine, OH: Press Printing Co., 1872), p. 260 “Marriage Record Champaign County” (Doc. #: Curry.OH.065).

        40. “Ohio, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1790-1890,” database, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017), Mirach H Curry.

        41. Jackson, Ronald Vern, Gary Ronald Teeples and David Schaefermeyer, editors, Index to Ohio Tax Lists 1800-1810 (Bountiful, Ohio: Accelerated Indexing Systems, Inc., 1977), Curry, Mirach H..

        42. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1793-1810: Genealogical and Historical Abstracts (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1986), p. 150 (from Western Spy and Hamilton Gazette, No. 24, Volume VIII, Tuesday 6 January 1807, Whole No. 388) (Doc. #: Curry.OH.034).

        43. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1793-1810: Genealogical and Historical Abstracts (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1986), p. 157 (from Western Spy and Hamilton Gazette, No. 48, Vilume VIII, Monday, 22 Juen 1807, Whole No. 412).

        44. , “James McBride to Rev. John W. Borwne”, Quarterly Publication of the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio Vol 4 no. 1 (Jan – March 1909): P. 17.

        45. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 249.

        46. Bowman, Mary L., Abstracts and Extracts of the Legislative Acts and Resolutions of the State of Ohio:  1803-1821 (: Ohio Genealogical Society, ), p. 97.

        47. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1802-1818 (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1988), Hiram Mirach Curry

        48. Bowman, Mary L., Abstracts and Extracts of the Legislative Acts and Resolutions of the State of Ohio:  1803-1821 (: Ohio Genealogical Society, ), p. 97, p. 144 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.038).

        49. Ohio Source Records from the Ohio Genealogical Quarterly (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1986), p. 25 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.041).

        50. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 593 (Curry.OH.068).

        51. The State, 1809 Legistlative Journal Volume 8, Issue 1 (: Ohio, 1809), page 338 — Currey; Curry on multiple pages. Hereinafter cited as Journal, Volume 8, Issue 1.

        52. Petty, Gerald M., compiler, Ohio 1810 Tax Duplicate Arranged in a State-wide Alphabetical List of Names of Taxpayers with an Index of Names of Original Entries (Columbus, Ohio: Gerald M. Petty, 1976), p. 39 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.021).

        53. Jackson, Ronald Vern, Gary Ronald Teeples and David Schaefermeyer, editors, Index to Ohio Tax Lists 1800-1810 (Bountiful, Ohio: Accelerated Indexing Systems, Inc., 1977), Curry, M. Hivans.

        54. Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio being the First Session of the Ninth General Assembly (Chillicothe, H: Joseph S. Collins & Co., 1810), pages 51 – 64 (Docs\Curry\hiram currey contested senate.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio.

        55. , “”, P. 17.

        56. “Protest,” LIberty Hall (Cincinnati, Ohio), 15 May 1811; Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). page 3.

        57. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 399 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.024).

        58. Masonic Membership Card, , membership card Harmony Lodge No. 8 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.077).

        59. History of Logan County and Ohio (Chicago: O. L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, 1880), p. 364 (Doc. #: Curry.OH>033).

        60. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1802-1818: Genealogical and Historical Abstracts (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1988), p. 95 (from Western Spy Volume II, 14 March1812, No. 79) (Doc. #: Curry.OH.035).

        61. “Law of Ohio – “An act establishing the Miami University”,” Western Star (Lebanon, Ohio), 14 March 1812; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017).

        62. “Electors of President and Vice President,” LIberty Hall (Cincinnati, Ohio), 20 October 1812; Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017).

        63. Antrim, Joshua, The History of Champaign and Logan Counties from Their First Settlements (Bellefontaine, OH: Press Printing Co., 1872), p. 42 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.032).

        64. Entry Champaign County Ohio Tax Record vol. 177, Champaign Co. OH. Hereinafter cited as Tax Record Champaign County Ohio.

        65. Ohio, Champaign County. Duplicate Tax Records: 1816-1827.  Film #004849021. Cury, HIram M, 1816 digital images, Family Search http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online November 2017.004849021

        66. The Ohio Repository, Ohio Election – Representatives: Champaign — Hiram M. Curry, 21 November 1816; newspaper images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017). Original Source: The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio).

        67. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1817.

        68. Ohio, Champaign County. Duplicate Tax Records: 1816-1827, Curry, HIram M, 1817; .

        69. , “To Establish a Permanent Seat of Government”, Old Northwest Quarterly 15 (July-Oct 1912): p. 91. Hereinafter cited as “To Establish a Permanent Seat of Government”.

        70. Martin, William T., History of Franklin County, Ohio (Columbus: Follett, Foster & Co., 1858), p. 42, 194, 350,  (Doc. #: Curry.OH.017).

        71. Gilkey, Elliot Howard, The Ohio Hundred Year Book: A Hand-Book of the Public Men and Public Institutions of Ohio from the Formation of the North-West Territory (1787) to July 1, 1901 (Columbus, OH: Fred J. Heer, State Printer, 1901), p. 451 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.036).

        72. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1802-1818: Genealogical and Historical Abstracts (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1988), p. 235 (from Western Spy, Volume IX, Friday,3 January 1817, no. 52) (Doc. #: Curry.OH.035).

        73. Bowman, Mary L., Abstracts and Extracts of the Legislative Acts and Resolutions of the State of Ohio:  1803-1821 (: Ohio Genealogical Society, ), p. 254, 260, 277, 303, 320, 322.

        74. Taft, Bob, Official Roster of Federal, State & County Officers & Departmental Information for 1991-1992 (Ohio: Ohio Department of State, ), p. 349.

        75. Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio, Being the First Session of the Eighteenth General Assembly, Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Sixth, 1819: and in the Eighteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1819), p. 30-32.

        76. Martin, William T., History of Franklin County: A Collection of Reminiscences of the Early Settlement of the County; with Biographical Sketches, and a complete History of the County to the Present Time (Columbus: Follett, Foster & Company, 1858), p. 449 (Curry.OH.009).

        77. Green, Karen Mauer, , Hiram M. Curry.

        78. The Franklin County Genealogical Society, compiler, editor,  Genealogical Name INdex to the Ohio Supreme Court Records Frnaklin County, Volumes I, II, III, IV with reference dates 1783 to 1839 (Columbus, Ohio: The Franklin County Genealogical Society, 1983), p. 18 Curry HIram M..

        79. Martin, William T., History of Franklin County: A Collection of Reminiscences of the Early Settlement of the County; with Biographical Sketches, and a complete History of the County to the Present Time (Columbus: Follett, Foster & Company, 1858), p. 42 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.028).

        80. Moore, Orpha, History of Franklin County Ohio Volume One (Topeka, KS: Historical Publishing Company, 1930), Hiram M. Curry.

        81. Martin, William T., History of Franklin County: A Collection of Reminiscences of the Early Settlement of the County; with Biographical Sketches, and a complete History of the County to the Present Time (Columbus: Follett, Foster & Company, 1858), p. 350.

        82. History of Franklin and Pickaway Counties, Ohio with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of the Prominent Men and Pioneers (Cleveland, OH: Williams Brothers, 1880), p. 541 “First Penitentiary” (Curry.OH.002).

        83. , “To Establish a Permanent Seat of Government”, (Curry.OH.005).

        84. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1818.

        85. Ohio, Champaign County. Duplicate Tax Records: 1816-1827, Cury, HIram M, 1818; .

        86. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1819.

        87. Ohio, Champaign County. Duplicate Tax Records: 1816-1827, Cury, HIram M, 1819; .

        88. “Gettysburg Compiler”, (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania), p. 4, 8 Dec 1819 (Curry.OH.125);

        89. American Beacon (Norfolk, Virginia), 3 December 1819; Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Volume IX: Issue 102, page 2.

        90. National Intelligencer (Washington, D.C.), 30 November 1819; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). page 1.

        91. “Columbus, Nov 19,” Canton Repository (Canton, Ohio), 26 November 1819; digitial iamge, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Page 3.

        92. Aiello, John Douglas, Ohio’s War Upon the Bank of the United States: 1817-1824 (: Ohio State University, 1972), Hiram M. Currey.

        93. Smith, David, Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio being the First Session of the Nineteenth General Assembly Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Fourth, 1820; and in the Nineteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Ohio Monitor, 1820), pages 53-65.

        94. Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio, Being the First Session of the Eighteenth General Assembly, Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Sixth, 1819: and in the Eighteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1819), p. 66-67 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.026).

        95. Smith, David, Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio being the First Session of the Nineteenth General Assembly Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Fourth, 1820; and in the Nineteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Ohio Monitor, 1820), p. 30 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.026).

        96. “[Article],” [ItemType], Canton Repository (Canton, Ohio), [IssueDate], [SpecificContent]; digitial iamge, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : [AccessType] [AccessDate]); [CreditLine]. [Annotation].

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        98. “From the Ohio Monitor,” Evening Post (New York, NY), 24 December 1819; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Issue 5466, page 2.

        99. “Columbia (Ohio) Nov. 18,” Weekly Aurora (Philadelphia, PA), 6 December 1819; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol X : Issue IIXL : Page 336.

        100. Canton Repository (Canton, Ohio), 17 December 1819; digitial iamge, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017); Page 3.

        101. Currey Hiram M., “Hiram M. Currey Letter To Thomas Rotch, Columbus, 21 Decr 1819,” letter, 21 December 1819, , Thomas and Charity Rotch Papers / Rotch-Wales Papers; Massillon Public Library, . available online at Ohio Memory, http://www.ohiomemory.org.  .

        102. “Re-elected,” Scioto Gazette (Chillicothe, Ohio), 24 December 1819; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Issue 19: page 3.

        103. Ohio Monitor (Columbus, Ohio), 13 January 1820; digital iamge, Genealogy bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol. IV : issue 26 : page 2.

        104. Utter, William T., The Frontier State 1803-1825 (Columbus, OH: Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 1942), p. 307-308.

        105. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1820.

        106. Gilkey, Elliot Howard, The Ohio Hundred Year Book: A Hand-Book of the Public Men and Public Institutions of Ohio from the Formation of the North-West Territory (1787) to July 1, 1901 (Columbus, OH: Fred J. Heer, State Printer, 1901), p. 451.

        107. Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio, Being the First Session of the Eighteenth General Assembly, Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Sixth, 1819: and in the Eighteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1819), Curry, HIram.

        108. Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, Being the First Session of the Eighteenth General Assembly (Columbus, Ohio: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1819), Curry, Hiram M..

        109. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 127.

        110. Smith, David, Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio being the First Session of the Nineteenth General Assembly Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Fourth, 1820; and in the Nineteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Ohio Monitor, 1820), P. 56 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.027).

        111. Coggeshall Wm T., “Brief History of the Treasury of Ohio from 1802 to 1857,” Belmont Chronicle (Saint Clairsvillle, Ohio), 23 July 1857; Newspapers.com (http://www.newspaprs.com : viewed online September 2016).

        112. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1821.

        113. “Ohio Legislature,” Ohio Monitor (Columbus, Ohio), 13 January 1821; digital iamge, Genealogy bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). vol V : issue 26 : page 1.

        114. “Legislature of Ohio,” Scioto Gazette (Chillicothe, Ohio), 4 January 1821; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol VI : Issue 21 : page 1.

        115. Ohio Monitor (Columbus, Ohio), 24 March 1821; digital iamge, Genealogy bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol V : issue 35 : page 3.

        116. Canton Repository (Canton, Ohio), 5 April 1821; digitial iamge, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). page 2.

        117. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio: being the First Session of the Twentieth General Assembly (Columbus, Ohio: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1821), p. 159viewed online December 2017.

        118. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 221.

        119. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 229.

        120. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 246.

        121. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 254.

        122. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 284.

        123. “Legislative Proceedings,” Steubenville Herald (Steubenville, Ohio), 9 February 1822; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol XV : Issue 6 : page 2.

        124. DeHart, General R. P., Past and Present of Tippecanoe County, Indiana (Indianapolis, IN: B. F. Bowen, 1909), p. 253.

        125. Baier, Mabel Van Dyke, 1830 Census Tippecanoe County, Indiana (Washington, D.C.: publshed by author, 1959), p. 45 (Curry.IN.030).

        126. Interview with (). (), (Curry.Cen.148).

        127. 1830 U.S. Census, Tippecanoe County, Indiana, population schedule, Fairfield Township, Tippecanoe County, Indiana, page 23 (image 13)], Hiram M. Curry; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017)

        128. Compiled by The Franklin County Genealogical Society, Genealogical Index to Chancery Book Volumes I, II, III, IV: 1823-1840 Franklin County, Ohio Court of Common please (Columbus, Ohio: Franklin County Genealogical Society, 1987), Curry, Hiram – pages 10 and 48.

        129. Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Tippecanoe County, Indiana (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1888), p. 334 (Curry.IN.018).

        130. DeHart, General R. P., Past and Present of Tippecanoe County, Indiana (Indianapolis, IN: B. F. Bowen, 1909), (Curry.IN.028).

James Marshall Ricketts

James Marshall Ricketts12 was born on 28 Nov 1847 in Clinton, Indiana, United States.314

James Ricketts was listed as a three year old male in the household of John Rickets on the 1850 census in Sugar Creek Township, Clinton County, Indiana.15

He was listed as a 12 year old male born Indiana in the household of John Ricketts in Sugar Creek Township, Clinton, Indiana, United States in Jul 1860.16

He enlisted in the military on 11 Sep 1863 in Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana, United States.17

James  served in Company K 7th Indiana Cavalry between 18 Sep 1863 and 19 Sep 1865.4,6,1718

He was discharged from the military on 19 Sep 1865 in Hempstead, Waller, Texas, United States.17

He received pension for service in K 7 Indiana Cavalry on 20 Apr 1870 .19

James M. Ricketts was listed as the head of household on the 1870 census. According to the census, James was 29 and born in Indiana. Also living in the household were Reachel, Artlissa and Jennie.20

James  purchased land being the N 1/2 SE 1/4 Section 6 Township 24 S Range 16 E for $825 from L W. Blumberg and his wife Martha on 18 Oct 1879 in Woodson, Kansas, United States.21

James M. Ricketts was listed as the head of the household on the 1880 census. According to the census, James was 32 and born in Indiana. James’ occupation was farming. Also listed in the household was his wife, Rachel A.; daughters Frances A., Hulda A., Anna B., Dais T and sons Manford and Esond. Ebenezer Christy was also living with the family.22

He lived in Neosho Falls, Woodson, Kansas, United States on 4 Jul 1883.17

He  purchased land being SE 1/4 SEction 35 Township 23 Range 15 from J. M. Baldwin on 1 Nov 1883 in Woodson, Kansas, United States.23

James M Ricketts was listed as the head of household on the 1885 Kansas census. According to the census, James was 38 years old. Also listed in the household were R.E., Artlissa, Hulda May, Ana Bell, Daisy P, Manfor and Desmond. A. Christy was also living in the household.9

James lived in Byron, Woodson, Kansas, USA in 1889.24

He sold mortgage on the Se 1/4 Section 10 Township 24 Range 17 and the N 1/2 NW 1/4 Section 8 Township 25 Range 17 for $1000 to Thomas Hoffern on 7 May 1892 in Woodson, Kansas, United States.25

J. M. Ricketts was listed as the head of household on the 1895 Kansas census. According to the census, J. M. was 48 years old and born in Indiana.12

James Ricketts was listed as the head of household on the 1900 census. According to the census, James was born Nov 1848 in Indiana. James and his wife, Rachel had been married 35 years. Also living in the household was his wife, Rachel, and a son, Manford.26

He owned the SE 1/4 Section 35 R15E T23S in 1904 in Liberty Township, Woodson, Kansas, United States.27

James was listed as a 58 year old male born in Indiana on the 1905 Kansas census living in Liberty Township, Woodson, Kansas, United States on 1 Mar 1905.11

He spent the day with Mr. and Mrs. Ed Briles on 25 Aug 1907 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.28

He lived in Vernon, Woodson, Kansas, United States on 30 Nov 1909.17

 James M Ricketts was listed as the head of the household on the 1910 census. According to the census, James was 62 years old and born in Indiana. Also living in the household was his wife, Rachel.29

J.M. Ricketts was listed as the head of the household on the 1915 Kansas state census in Woodson County. According to the census, J.M. was a 67 year old farmer born in Indiana.13

James M Ricketts was listed as the head of household on the 1920 census. According to the census, James was 72 years old and born in Indiana. Also living in the household was his wife, Rachel E. Ricketts.30

James died on 28 Nov 1920 at the age of 73 in Liberty Township, Woodson, Kansas, United States.34,6,8,14,3134

He was buried on 29 Nov 1920 in Liberty (Dutro), Woodson County, Kansas.8,14,35

He had his estate probated on 8 Jan 1921 in Woodson, Kansas, United States.36

Preparer:

  Marcia Philbrick

  803 N 8th

  Seneca, KS

        1. 1895 Kansas State Census, Woodson County Kansas, Kansas State Census, Liberty Township, Woodson County, Kansas, page 12 Image 18 of 76, family 74, J M Ricketts; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 5 April 2021); Kansas State Historical Society

        2. 1905 Kansas Census, Neosho Falls, Woodson County, state census, Liberty Township, Woodson County, Kansas, page 10 Image 19 of 70, family 76, J M Ricketts; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 5 April 2021)

        3. Entry, Descendants of John Reed, 32543 Carlyle St., Hayward, CA 94544, (Reed.IN.052); , . Hereinafter cited as Descendants of John Reed.

        4. , (Ricketts.KS.003), Dutro Cemetery, , .

        5. Kentuckians in Ohio and Indiana (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1986)

        6. “Yates Center News”, (Yates Center, Kansas), to (), “Died” Friday Dec. 3, 1920, page 4, col 3 (Ricketts.Notebook); ,

        7. James M. Ricketts file; James M. Ricketts;  (: ), Pension Record.

        8. Ancestry Database, U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012).

        9. Ancestry.com, Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009), Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, Kansas; 1885 Kansas Territory Census; Roll: KS1885_143; Line: 9.

        10. Yates Publishing, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004), Source number: 446.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: MP1.

        11. , Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925, Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, Kansas; 1905 Kansas Territory Census; Roll: ks1905_172; Line: 22.

        12. , Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925, Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, Kansas; 1895 Kansas Territory Census; Roll: v115_164; Line: 8.

        13. , Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925, Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, Kansas; Roll: ks1915_258; Line: 18.

        14. James Marshall Ricketts, death certificate #104 898 (29 November 1920), Kansas State Board of Health, Division of Vital Statistics, Topeka, Kansas.

        15. 1850 U.S. Census, Clinton County Indiana, population schedule, Sugar Creek Township, Clinton County, Indiana, page 406, household 10, John Rickets; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online August 2018); NARA microfilm pubication M432.

        16. 1860 U.S. Census, Clinton County Indiana, population schedule, Sugar Creek Township, Clinton County, Indiana, page 149, houshold 1088, John Rickets; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017); NARA microfilm publication M653.

        17. James M. Ricketts, Military Pension, James M. Ricketts, (Ricketts.Notebook).

        18. Kansas, Enrollment of Civil War Veterans, 1889, J M Ricketts, 1889; database with images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online October 2017). Original Source: Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, Kansas State Historical Society.

        19. U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, James M Ricketts, 20 April 1870; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online August 2018).

        20. 1870 U.S. Census, Clinton County, Indiana, population schedule, Sugar Creek Township, Clinton County, Indiana, page 9 Image 9 of 25, family 66, Ricketts James M; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T132

        21. Woodson County, Kansas. Book H, Page 385 (Ricketts.KS.010).

        22. 1880 U.S. Census, Center Township, Woodson County, Kansas, population schedule, Everett Township, Woodson County, Kansas, ED 58, page 7 Image 7 of 15, household 53, James M Ricketts; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T9

        23. Woodson County, Kansas. Book Q page 143 (Ricketts.Notebook).

        24. Ancestry.com, Kansas, Enrollment of Civil War Veterans, 1889 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013).

        25. Woodson County, Kansas. Deed Indexes Book 3, Refers to Book Y page 213 (Ricketts.KS.007).

        26. 1900 U.S. Census, North Township, Woodson County, Kansas, population schedule, Liberty Township, Woodson County, KS, ED 186, sheet 3B Image 6 of 18, household 162, Ricketts James; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); FHL microfilm: 1240503

        27. Standard Atlas of Woodson County, Kansas 1904 (: , 1904)

        28. “Rock Creek Sr,” The Daily Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 27 August 1907, p. 2; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online July 2018).

        29. 1910 U.S. Census, Woodson County, Kansas, population schedule, Liberty Township, Woodson County, Kansas, ED 147, Sheet 2B Image 4 of 16, household 47, Ricketts James M; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T624

        30. 1920 U.S. Census, Woodson County, Kansas, population schedule, Liberty Township, Woodson County, Kansas, ED 156, Sheet 2B Image 4 of 13, household 41, James M Ricketts; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T625

        31. “Yates Center News”, (Yates Center, Kansas), to (), “Died” Frday, Feb. 4, 1927, page 7 col. 4 (Ricketts.Notebook); ,

        32. “Crandall,” The Daily Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 2 December 1920, p. 1; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online July 2018).

        33. “Died,” The Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 December 1920, page 4; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online November 2019).

        34. “Obituary – Mrs. J. M. Ricketts,” The Iola Register (Iola, Kansas), 4 February 1927, page 2; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 22 August 2020).

        35. Find a Grave, database and images, Find a Grave (www.findagrave.com : viewed online September 2016), memorial for James M Ricketts (1847-1920), Find a Grave Memorial no. #41926097, created by Robin Hixon, citing Liberty Dutro Cemetery, Woodson County, Kansas; accompanying photograph by Robin Hixon, James M Ricketts.

        36. Kansas, Wills and Probate Records, 1803-1987, J M Ricketts, 8 January 1921; database on-line, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online August 2018).