Military Record FOUND!

crawford-eugene-b1927-1945-us-navyWhen it comes to military records from World War II, the saying ‘Time Heals’ has some merit. During my early days of researching my family history, I was told that my dad’s military file probably didn’t exist. This wasn’t because someone threw it away but because of a fire in the building housing the personnel files. Thus, I had been content with a copy of his discharge record from the Ford County Recorder of Deed’s Office. That was until recently, when I found out some files survived and other files are being reconstructed. Thus, I tried again — AND — received his complete file. I am so thankful that I sought out this record! Below is his military history as outlined by various documents in his file.

Eugene David Crawford passed the Eddy Test and was technically qualified for Radio Technician training in the U.S. Navy on 6 Feb 1945. The Eddy Test was a test given to identify men with the capability and aptitude for being trained as electronics maintenance technicians in the U.S. Navy.

Eugene enlisted in the United States Naval Reserves on 15 Feb 1945 at U.S. Naval Reserve Station in Kansas City, Missouri.  On 15 Feb 1945 at the U.S. Navy Recruiting Station in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, he was ordered to active duty without pay and to proceed to home at 512 Avenue ‘G”, Dodge City, Kansas and upon arrival he should consider himself released from active duty to await further orders.

On 16 May 1945, Eugene was received at the U.S. Naval Reserve Station in Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas.  On 17 May 1945, he graduated from Dodge City Senior High School in Dodge City, Ford, County Kansas. He was recalled to active duty on 20 May 1945 at U.S. Naval Reserve Station in Kansas City, Missouri.

Eugene was transferred to the U.S. Naval Training Center in Great Lakes, Illinois on 21 May 1945. He reported for active duty on 21 May 1945 at the U.S. Naval Training Center in Great Lakes, Illinois. He was granted recruit leave from 9 Jul 1945 to 14 July 1945 at the U.S. Naval Training Center in Great Lakes, Illinois.

On July 20, 1945, Eugene was transferred to the Navy Training College for study of pre-radio material at Wright Junior College in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. He was transferred to the Naval Training School (EE & RM) for a course of instructions at U.S. Naval Training Center in Gulfport, Mississippi on 15 Aug 1945. He was discharged from class V-6 US Naval Reserve on 4 Sep 1945. Eugene enlisted in the U.S. Navy as a seaman 1st class radio technician on 5 Sep 1945 at Naval Training Center in Gulfport, Mississippi. He reported for active duty in the U.S. Navy on 5 Sep 1945 in Gulfport, Mississippi.

Eugene was discharged from the U.S. Navy on 23 Oct 1945 for convenience of the government at Naval Training Center in Gulfport, Mississippi. Eugene voluntarily enlisted in Class V6 US Naval Reserve on 23 Oct 1945 in Gulfport, Mississippi. On Jan 4, 1946, he was transferred to the Naval Training Center at Great Lakes, Illinois. (In talking about his military experience, dad said he ‘flunked out’ of radio school. This is somewhat ironic in that Eugene Crawford majored in science in college and spent most of his career teaching science — including physics. As a retiree, Eugene earned his Amateur Radio license.)

oneida2On the first of May, 1946, Eugene was transferred to receiving station in Shoemaker, California. Eugene was transferred for duty aboard the USS Oneida (APA-221) under Captain Harry A. Guthrie, U.S. Navy on 20 May 1946. The USS Oneida (APA-221) was a Haskell-class attack transport. He served outside the continental limits of the United States in the Pacific Ocean around Guam and Samar from 1 Jun 1946 to 16 July 1946 aboard the U.S.S. Oneida (APA-221) During this time, the U.S.S. Oneida participated in Operation Magic Carpet, returning veterans to the states. (In talking about his shipboard experience, dad said one of the soldiers being transported home was a former grade school classmate who had moved away from Dodge City.)

On 24 July 1946, Eugene was transferred to the receiving station at Treasure Island in San Francisco, San Francisco County, California. He  received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Navy as Seaman First Class V-6 USNR on 1 Aug 1946 in Norman, Oklahoma.

 

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Judson Foster Crawford – Josie Winifred Hammond

crawford-judson-b1866-1940-portrait

Judson Foster Crawford was born in April 1866 in Warren County, Indiana. He was the second child born to Washington Marion and Mary (Foster) Crawford. Judson’s father had only been home from the war for a year when Judson was born.

At the age of 14, Judson was living with his parents in Warren County, Indiana. Family tradition says that as a young adult, Judson

  • was a cook’s helper on a cattle drive
  • worked on a ranch
  • worked in a grocery store

Even though these stories are hard to prove, they could all be true. Judson’s uncle, James H. Crawford migrated from Indiana to the Dodge City area where he owned both a ranch and a grocery store. Thus, Judson could have worked for his uncle on the ranch or in town at the store. The 1885 Kansas census indicates that Judson did work in a store since his occupation is listed as clerk.

At the age of 23, Judson went to work for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad in Dodge City.

A little over a year later, he married Josie Winifred Hammond on Christmas Eve in 1890 in Dodge City. Josie was born in Knox County, Illinois in 1874, the daughter of Richmond Fisk and Sarah (Ralston) Hammond. By 1880, the Hammond family was living in Hardin County, Iowa. By 1887, Richmond purchased land in Ford county and moved his family to the Dodge City area.

Judson and Josie welcomed their first child, Bernice Crawford,  in 1892. Having been transferred to Newton, Kansas, their first son, Leon Russel Crawford, was born in 1894. The following year, they were living back in Dodge City when Marion Richmond Crawford was born.

Family stories indicate that the family moved to Oklahoma to live near Josie’s sister. These stories indicate that life was not easy in Oklahoma and that the children almost died. Other than records involving Josie’s sister, Stella Root, the 1900 census is the only source that might support this family tale. The 1900 census indicates that Judson was working as a carpenter — and NOT for the railroad. By 1905, Judson is again working for the railroad.

The family was living in Dodge City in 1900 when a daughter, Helen Marjorie Crawford, joined the family. The youngest son, Hugh Judson Crawford, joined the family in 1902. The youngest daughters, Esther Stella and Lois Elida Crawford were born in 1905 and 1909 in Dodge City.

crawford-judson-b1866-1919-atsf-joint-general-committee-brotherhood-railroad-trainmenBy 1915, Judson was identified as the night yard master for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. In 1919, he was a member of the AT&SF Joint General Committee. Judson continued working as a switchman for the Santa Fe railroad and retired in 1936.

Judson was active in the community. As a young man, Judson was a member of the fire department and served as the assistant secretary in 1891. At the age of 54, Judson was a school board member for the Dodge City Schools.

crawford-judson-b1866-1945-portrait-josieJudson and Josie celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1940.

Judson passed away at the age of 82 in Dodge City. He was buried in the family plot in the Maple Grove Cemetery in Dodge City.