Land on Sugar Creek / Mary Crawford

This indenture made this 23 day of March and year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred ninety one between Richard Cave and Elizabeth his wife of the county of Woodford and District of Kentucky of the one part and Mary Crawford of the County of Madison and District aforesaid of the other part witnesseth that the said Richard Cave and Elizabeth his wife for and in consideration of the sum of seventy pounds current money of Virginia to them in hand paid by the said Mary Crawford the receipt whereof he the said Richard Cave and Elizabeth his wife doth hereby acknowledge and themselves therewith fully sattisfied and content hath granted bargained sold aliened and confirmed and by these presents doth grant bargain sell alien and confirm unto the said Mary Crawford one certain tract or parcel of land containing by survey one hundred acres situate lying and being in the aforesaid county of Madison and on the waters of Sugar Creek and is bounded as follows (to wit) Beginning at a black walnut and buck tree standing in the line of Richard Caves survey four hundred acres on said Creek and corner to William McChears hundred acres extending from thence south one hundred and fifty six poles to a sugar tree and Hickory from thence north sixty four degrees west seventy two poles to a Buck thence north forty five degrees west one hundred and eighteen poles to four Linns growing from one root from thence North forty poles to a Buckeye and Sugar tree corner to William McCluer and from thence East one hundred and sixty poles binding on McCluers line to the beginning including the said Mary Crawfords clearing and improvements with its appurtenances to have and to hold the said land and premises with every of its appertinences unto the said Mary Crawford and her heirs forever and the said Richard Cave for himself his heirs executors and administrators the said land and premises unto the said Mary Crawford heir heirs executors and administrators shall and will warrant and for ever defend against the claim of him the said Richard Cave and Elizabeth his wife their heirs executors and administrators or from any other person or persons claiming by or under them and against the claim of all and every other person or persons whatsoever In witness whereof the said Richard Cave and Elizabeth his wife for themselves their heirs exeuctors and administrators hath hereunto set their hands and affixed their seals this day and year first above written

Signed sealed acknowledged
and delivered in the presents of
(The three letters in the second line the word Woodford interlined before send)
Michael Turner
Charles Bland
witnesses for Richd Cave
Thos McClure
William McClure
witnesses for Elizabeth Cave

images 205-206-207 of 429
film #007896910

  • Madison County Kentucky, Book of Deeds, Vol. A 1787-1790: images 205, 206, 207, Mary Crawford, grantee; FamilySearch microfilm # 007896910.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Is that the right name? Writing first proof argument

Even though I’ve been adding sources to events in my family tree for years, I hadn’t written a ‘proof’ argument until the last month. For my first proof argument, I decided to write out my reasoning behind my great-grandfather’s name: Washington Marion Crawford.

When I started researching my family, my grandmother was my primary source of information. Even though she married into the Crawford family, she knew a lot about the family. Besides the photo albums, grandma took me on a tour of the cemetery. Since I grew up knowing about what I considered to be  ‘the’ family plot, I was surprised when she showed me other plots containing my great-great grandparents. The Crawford plot for my great-great grandparents was where I first encountered the ‘mystery of the name’. The tall family stone showed my great-great grandfather as Marion Crawford. Even though my grandmother had not met him, she knew of him as Marion Crawford. Near the tall headstone was a military stone – with a different name: Wash N Crawford.

Thus started the quest to figure out his name. Over time, I collected a wide variety of records using different variations of his name. For my proof argument, I decided to look at those records again and see how each record recorded his name.

Sources using Marion Crawford

  • Obituary – Ford County Republican
  • 1850 Census – Warren County, Indiana – household of Nelson Crawford
  • 1880 Census — Warren County, Indiana
  • Family Tombstone

Sources using M Crawford

  • 1885 Kansas Census – Ford County, Kansas

Sources using Washington Crawford

  • 1860 Census – Warren County, Indiana

Sources using W. Marion Crawford

  • Obituary – Dodge City Times
  • Lewis Post No. 294 GAR – Resolution

Sources using Washington M. Crawford

  • Coroner’s Report
  • U.S. Records of Headstones of Deceased Union Veterans 1879-1903 (FamilySearch)
  • Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans 1879-1903 (Ancestry)
  • Certified copy of marriage license – Warren County, Indiana
  • Military and Pension file for Washington M. Crawford

Sources using Wash N Crawford

  • Footstone

Based on the fact that all of the legal documents (marriage license, military record, coroner’s report, etc.) use the name Washington M. Crawford, I have concluded that his first name is Washington. Based on the fact that an obituary and the resolution for the GAR post identify him as W. Marion Crawford, I have concluded his middle name is Marion. Thus, I believe his legal name was

Washington Marion Crawford

even though family often referred to him as Marion Crawford.

Crawford Research: Which James Is Which?

My ancestor, James Crawford, died in Preble County, Ohio in 1854. In 1821, he sold a piece of land to Wm Sellers. This Preble County Deed (Book 5, page 87), identifies the seller as James Crawford Junr and indicates that James was from Preble County, Ohio. The deed is signed by James Crawford and Sally Crawford. Sally’s signature is significant since it identifies my James Crawford and not another James Crawford living in Preble County at the time.

James Crawford married Sally Duggins in Garrard County, Kentucky on 12 Sep 1799. So far, this marriage record is the only piece of data I have that I can say for certain applies to this particular James Crawford.

In trying to learn more about my Crawford ancestry and to try and identify family units in early Kentucky, I have been going back thru the tax records. Besides tracking the CRAWFORD surname thru these tax records, I am also following the DUGGINS and the SELLERS surname.

At this point, I’ve transcribed the tax records for Lincoln, Madison, Garrard counties Kentucky and Preble county Ohio and am working on Barren County, Kentucky. All of these records are being summarized into what is becoming a fairly large table in Exel.

Hopefully, this study of the tax lists will help me identify the various CRAWFORD families in this area of Kentucky prior to 1800. This is an ongoing project since I likely need to add several more counties and then locate the land records for the property identified in these tax records.

 

 

 

Prisoner of War

State of Indiana Warren County SS

Before me the undersigned authority personally appeared Washington M Crawford who being by me first duly sworn says

my age is 46 years.

In the matter of my claim for pension No 170744 my occupation has always been that of a farmer. For five year preceding my enlistment in Co H 2nd NY Cav I worked on a farm for my father in Washington township Warren County Ind except the last year prior to the breaking out of the war I moved to Jordan township and began farming for myself. I continued there until August 3rd 1861, when I enlisted in the army in the above named Co and regiment. I was in all the engagements the regiment was in from the time of its organization until the 22nd day of Sept 1863 when I was taken prisoner in an engagement between Gen Kilpatrick and Gen Stewart near Liberty Mills Va.

The circumstances under which my disability was incurred was hardships of prison life such as being confined with thirty five thousand men on about sixteen acres of ground with insufficient food and no shelter except a government blanket which makes a poor Shade and no shelter from the rain whatever. I passed the winter of 1863 and 1864 in Bell Isle and in March 64 I was taken to Andersonville Ga where I incurred the disability during the summer of 1864. I went from there to Charleston SC and there eighteen days and was then taken to Florence SC where on the 7th of Dec 64 I was paroled in the agreement between two Commissioners to exchange ten thousand sick.

I arrived home in June 1865 and remained on the old homestead with my mother and was treated by Dr Tebbs and Dr Greeley who are both deceased. In 1866 I lived in Jordan township, tried farming and received treatment from Dr Frankeberger who is also deceased. In 1867 I lived in Washington township followed farming and was again treated by Dr Greely. I remained in Washington township until 1871 when I moved to Pike township and followed farming there until 1873 when I again moved to Washington township where I have remained to the present and have been following farming.

I am a constant sufferer with the following troubles: rheumatism, neuralgic, bronchitis, piles and the effects of Scurvy in my feet My treatment since the death of Drs Tebbs of Williamsport Ind, Dr Greely of West Lebanon Ind, and Dr Frankeberger of Jordan has been by Dr Leech who now resides at Crawfordsville Ind, Dr T B Campbell of West Lebanon, Ind and Dr. Osborne of West Lebanon Ind

I have performed manual labor every year since the war except the first year immediately after the war. I have not been able at any time since the war to do a full day’s work from the fact that my feet are so affected that I cannot stand the walking. My mussles also pain me so that I am compelled to stop. I am not able to do more than one fourth as much of any kind of farm work as I could before the war. When I do any heavy work it brings on piles when I am exposed. I suffer with Bronchitus. All the work I do must be done under great difficulties and with great pain. I am frequently confined to the house and sometimes to my bed but I cannot give dates as to time of said confinement. All I can do with any degree of certainty is to oversee the work and do chores.

I have not suffered at any time with any acute disease since my discharge from the Army.

Washington M Crawford

 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 7th day of April 1884 and I certify that I have not interest in the claim this affidavit seeks to establish.

Henry C Johnson, Clk.

Fry Bryant Dep

From the Military and Pension Record File of Washington M. Crawford, obtained via mail from the National Archives and Record Administration.