Crawfords in Early Kentucky

Do you have family in early Kentucky? If so, have you wished for a statewide census to help you locate various family members? Unfortunately, those early statewide census records don’t exist. Instead, various sources used the county tax records to create a list of inhabitants.

While looking for books for Nemaha county, Kansas, I stumbled across the book Crawford Family History [Genealogical Research Institute, c1973] on my bookshelf. In that little book is a chapter titled, 1790 Census. This chapter includes a list of CRAWFORDs arranged by state.

While the chapter implies that these names are from 1790 records, a reading of the chapter indicates differently for Kentucky.

Additional names from a reconstructed 1800 census schedule (compiled from lists of taxpayers) for the state of Kentucky are also included.

Thus, the names listed for Kentucky are for 1800 and not 1790.

While the above list is helpful, it is also deceiving. Since the list was created from tax lists, one is dependent on the availability and legibility of those tax lists.

For example, based on other research, I’m aware of a David Crawford in Barren County. However, there isn’t a David Crawford on the compiled list. The 1799 tax list for Barren County includes a David Crawford.

There is also only one James Crawford in Barren County and none in Garrard or Madison counties.

1800 Tax list Barren County Kentucky

In 1801, the tax list again shows a David Crawford along with James Crawford with multiple parcels of land.

1801 Tax List Barren County, Kentucky

By 1802, there are now two James Crawfords but David is missing.

1802 Tax List Barren County, Kentucky

Since I was aware of several James Crawford families in early Kentucky, I also wanted to identify those in Kentucky around 1790. I found a copy of the book, “First Census” of Kentucky 1790 on the FamilySearch site. This book is a compilation of residences from tax records. It lists the following CRAWFORDs living in Kentucky.

page 24
Craford, James Fayette 11/16/1790
Craford, James, Sr. Fayette 1/11/1790
Craford, William Fayette 1/11/1790
Crawford, Hugh Nelson 11/26/1792
Crawford, Hugh, Sr. Nelson 12/3/1792
Crawford, Isaac Fayette 2/27/1790

page 25
Crawford, James Madison 4/28/1789
Crawford, Jno. Lincoln 4/21/1790
Crawford, John Nelson 10/24/1792
Crawford, Joseph Jefferson 4/30/1789
Crawford, Mary Madison 4/22/1789
Crawford, Mary Madison 4/22/1789
Crawford, Robert Jefferson 5/2/1789
Crawford, Samuel Nelson 12/3/1792
Crawford, William Madison 4/29/1789

Heinemann, Charles B., compiler. “First Census” of Kentucky 1790. Provo, Utah: Stevenson’s Genealogical Center, 1940. available online at FamilySearch.org.

Since I had already done a bit of research in Kentucky tax records for the early counties, I decided to check the remaining counties that were present in 1789. (map on mapofus.org/kentucky)

Based on that search of Kentucky tax records, I came up with the following CRAWFORD listings.

1787
• Lincoln County, KY Image 5 — Crofford John – 4 horses, 4 cattle
• Lincoln County, KY Image 21 – Crawford Rebekah (widow) – recorded on July 5th – no horses or cattle
• Madison County KY – Image 10 – Crawford Mary – 3 horses, 11 cattle
• Madison County, KY – image 10 –Crawford James – 6 horses, 15 cattle
• Madison County, KY – Image 11 – Crawford Willm – 6 horses, 8 cattle

1788
• Madison County, KY – Image 63 Crawford William – 1 white male taxable – 6 horses
• Madison County, KY – image 63 – Crawford, James – 1 white male taxable – 5 horses
• Madison County, KY – image 62 – Crawford Mary – 2 horses

1789
• Jefferson County, KY – image 9 – Crawford, Joseph 1 horse
• Jefferson County, KY – image 9 – Crawford, Robert, 1 male 16-21, 2 horses
• Lincoln County, KY Image 61 – Crawford Rebeca – 1 male 16-21; 6 horses
• Lincoln County, KY Image 104 – Crofford, Alexander – 9 horses
• Lincoln County, KY Image 117 – Crawford, John – 5 horses
• Madison County, KY – Image 82 – Crawford, Mary – 1 white tithable >16, 3 horses
• Madison County, KY – Image 82 – Crawford, James – 1 white tithable >16 – 7 horses
• Madison County, KY – image 82 – Crawford, William – 1 white tithable > 16, 4 horses
• Mercer County, KY – NIL

1790
• Lincoln County, KY Image 128 – Crawford John – 4 horses
• Lincoln County, KY Image 140 – James Crofford – 3 horses

1791
• Jefferson County, KY – image 40 – Crawford, Joseph – no horses (nothing)
• Madison County, KY image 123 – Crawford William – 2 [tithables] 5 [horses]
• Madison County, KY – Image 123 – Crawford James – 1 [tithable] 7 ]horses]
• Madison County, KY – image 123 – Crawford Mary 1 [tithable] 3[ horses]
• Mason County, KY – Image 17 – Crawford John 1 male > 16, 1 black > 16
• Woodford County, KY – image 54 – Josiah Crawford – 1 titheable, 2 horses

1792
• Bourbon County, KY image 134 – Crofford William – 1 male > 21, 2 horses. 5 cattle
• Madison County, KY Image 132 – Crawford William – 1 male >21; 2 males 16-21; 13 horses; 16 cattle; 180 acres
• Madison County, KY Image 132 – Crawford Mary — 1 male 16-21; 4 horses; 10 cattle; 100 acres
• Madison County, KY Image 132 – Crawford James – 1 male > 21; 2 horses – 1 cattle
• Madison County, KY Image 132 – Crawford James – 1 male > 21; 9 horses; 25 cattle; 150 acres
• Madison County, KY Image 133 – Crawford Alexander – 1 male >21; 1 horse; 9 cattle; 64 acres
• Nelson County, KY – Image 7 — Crawford John – 1 male > 21, 1 horse
• Nelson County, KY – Image 7 — Crawford Hugh – 1 Male > 21, 1 black < 16, 2 horses, 9 cattle, 112 acres

• Nelson County, KY – Image 7 — Crawford Hugh Snr – 1 male > 21, 4 horses, 11 cattle
• Nelson County, KY – Image 7 — Crawford, Samuel 1 male > 21, 1 horse

Mercer County missing 1790-1794

1795
• Mercer County, KY – Image 12 Crawford Jas 1 white male > 21, 1 horse, 5 cows
• Mercer County, KY Image 23 Crawford William 1 male > 21, 2 horses, 9 cows

As with the 1800 list, I found people in the earlier tax lists that are not in the “First Census” book. The most obvious discrepancy is Rebekah who is found on the 1787 and 1789 tax lists in Lincoln County, Kentucky.

Rebekah purchased 100 acres of land on the headwaters of Boone and Sugar Creeks in 1786. This land in Garrard county isn’t sold until after 1800. Thus, one would think there would be a tax record for this land.

This study of census/tax records will help me figure out the various Crawford families in early Kentucky and their migration.

Nelson G. Crawford

One of my January blog posts was about how I was finding issues in my family tree that was causing me to go back over some of my research. While I listed several issues, a faithful reader provided another reason in a comment:

new records now available online

While working with ‘suggestions’ on WikiTree, I found that I had a source tied to my great-great grandmother’s birth without any notes or images to verify that the source contained information for her birth. In addition, the footnote for the source was not very informative.

Thankfully, this book is available online via FamilySearch. Thus, I was able to access the book to create a better source citation, transcribe the entry and save images to my computer.

With RootsMagic 8, I was also able to merge my new source with the older incomplete source. Thus, all of the citations for this biography were also updated.

Nelson G. Crawford

page 274

Nelson G. Crawford, postmaster of Dodge city, was born in West Lebanon, Indiana, October 29, 1881, son of W. Marion and Mary (Foster) Crawford. The father was born in Indiana and devoted his entire life to farming. He died at Dodge City in September [1?]. The mother who was active in church work, was born in Warren County, Indiana, August 26, 1842, and [?] at Dodge City, January 21, 1929.
Educated first in the public schools of Dodge City, Nelson G. Crawford attended Dodge City High School four years, until 1899. In the summer of 1900 he [en]tered postal service at Dodge City, being designated [the] assistant postmaster in May, 1901.
With the exception of about two months, May and June 1906, Mr. Crawford has been in the postal [ser]vice ate Dodge City, as assistant postmaster until [his] appointment as postmaster on February 4, 1938. [He] was re-appointed on February 5, 1932. Mr. Crawford [was] a Republican.
On July 7, 1907, he was married to Cora B. Adams at Dodge City. She was born at Salem, Indiana, [daugh]

page 275
ter of John G. and Surrilda (Adams) Adams. Before her marriage she was employed y a mercantile firm at Dodge City.
Mr. Crawford is a member of the National Association of Postmasters, the Service Postmasters Association, the Chamber of Commerce, the Kiwanis Club (president, 1925; district trustee, 1928), and St. Bernard Lodge No. 222 of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Royal Arch Masons, the Royal and Select Masters (past commander), the Knights Templar and Midian Temple of the Shrine at Wichita. HI religious affiliation is with the Methodist Episcopal Church. His club is the Dodge City Country Club. (Photograph in Album).
Residence: Dodge City

Sarah Mullin Baldwin, editor, Illustriana Kansas: biographical sketches of Kansas men and women of achievement who have been awarded life membership in Kansas illustriana society (Hebron, Nebraska: Illustriana Incorporated, 2933), pages 274-275, 1289; digital images, FamilySearch, http://www.familysearch.org viewed online 30 January 2023.

Thankfully, these digital resources are available. Without them, I would not have been able to access this book from home.

Crawford Immigration

We’re all pretty familiar with the term, “Fake News.” But, have you thought of that term in relation to your genealogy research?

While digging thru my genealogy bookshelf, I came across a book that I purchased quite a few years ago called Crawford Family History. This book was published in 1973 by the American Genealogical Research Institute.

Within that book, is a chapter on ‘Ancestral Emigrants.’ On pages 31-32 of the book is the following statement:

“For a start, if your ancestors immigrated in or prior to 1800, the chances are good that you need look no further. The listing which follows contains all known recorded immigrants of the Crawford family for that time frame.”

On page 33, there is a list of Crawford immigrants:

  • Aaron Crawford: born 1680; emigrated from Tyrone, Ireland to Rutland, Massachusetts, in the spring of 1713, children were Samuel, John and Alexander.
  • Daniel Crawford: transported from Newgate Prison to Maryland n board the ship Patapscoe on 17 March 1728; indentured servant.
  • Henry Crawford: emigrated from Paisley, Scotland, to New York on board the ship Matty on May 1774, aged 25; weaver.
  • James Crawford: emigrated from England to Maryland in January 1711/12; clerk.
  • James Crawford: emigrated from Londonderry, Ireland, to Newton, Massachusetts, around 1730; later moved to Union, Connecticut; married to Elizabeth Campbell; children were Margaret and Robert.
  • John Crawford; born 1600, died 1676; emigrated from Ayrshire, Scotland, to Jamestown, Virginia, in 1643; killed during Bacon’s Rebellion.
  • John Crawford: transported from Newgate Prison to Maryland on board the ship Margarett on 11 May 1719; indentured servant.
  • John Crawford: emigrated from Paisley, Scotland, to New York on board the ship Commerce in February 1774, aged 35; weaver; married to Margaret ——; chilren were Lawrence, Margaret, and John.
  • Robert Crawford: emigrated from Bristol, England, to Maryland in February 1774, aged 22; rope maker,; indentured servant.
  • Robert Crawford: emigrated from Scotland to Georgia on board the ship Georgia Packet in September 1775, aged 16; yeoman.
  • Thomas Crawford; emigrated from England to Maryland in January 1703/04; clerk.
  • Thomas Crawford; transported from Newgate Prison to Maryland on board either the ship Speedwell or the ship Mediterranean on 21 April 1741; indentured servant.
  • William Crawford; immigrated to Virginia in 1648
  • William Crawford; also known as John Cole; transported from Newgate Prison to Maryland on bard the ship Worcester Frigate on 20 February 1718/19; indentured servant

I would love for this to be true, but that would imply that tracing the descendants of these men along with our ancestors would lead to a connection. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to make such a connection with any of my Crawford research.

While checking for more information on any of these Crawford immigrant, I looked at the book, Early Ancestors of the Crawfords in America on archive.org. That book has a chapter called The Great Immigration. This book implies that there were many more immigrants than those identified in the Crawford Family History book.

page 38 – The Great Immigration

Before 1718 there were some settlers in America from Scotland and a few Scotch from Ulster. After the civil was in England in the time of Charles I, a considerable number of Scotch prisoners of war were sent to the American colonies and sold into service.

There was a settlement of Scotch-Irish on the coast of Main as early as 1670 which was afterward dispersed by the Indians.

The great immigration from Ulster came in 1718 and
the following quarter century, when, it has been estimated,
one-third of the Scotch population left home and migrated
to America. No doubt this exodus from Donegal and
Derry stimulated the same action among the people of
Scotland. In 1718 a petition signed by three hundred and
eleven persons of North Ireland was addressed to Governor
Shute of New England.

The signatures attached to this petition are arranged
in eight columns but, unfortunately, the residences are not
given. Among them is the name of James Crawford

During the year 1718, several shiploads of the Scotch-
Irish signers of that petition and their friends and neighbors
emigrated to America. Five shiploads landed in Boston;
so many, in fact, invaded the town that the officials
were greatly disturbed. During the late summer and
autumn, from five hundred to seven hundred Scotch-Irish
protestants entered the port of Boston. They were not
very welcome, although Cotton Mather and his church,
with other clergymen, in spite of the stiff Presbyterianism
of the newcomers, did all they could to make them comfortable.
Indeed, in this immigration Mather saw a great
opportunity for the spread of the Gospel. The town authorized
the selectmen to spend an amount not exceeding
£1500, which the town then had on hand, for food. The
town “Granarys” were opened and corn sold to prevent
profiteering, yet the price of grain doubled during the
winter of 1718-19. With the coming of spring these people
were pushed out as rapidly as possible among the frontier
towns, especially in Worcester County.
During the next ten years many more came. The central
towns of Massachusetts and the northern towns of Connecticut,
the middle portion of New Hampshire, and parts
of Maine were largely settled by North-of-Ireland Scotch
people. Large numbers of them also went to Pennsylvania,
Virginia, and the Carolinas.

page 58

The Scotch-Irish in Northern Ireland and the American
Colonies (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1936), by
Maude Glasgow, is a vigorous presentation of the subject,

page 59
if somewhat partisan, and shows evidence of much research
into original sources. Somewhat more than half
of the book is devoted to the history of the Scotch in
Ireland and the remainder to the Scotch-Irish in America.
The history of Ireland, especially during the seventeenth
century, is a highly controversial subject. The point of
view of the author, whether Catholic, Presbyterian, or
Church of England, too often is allowed to determine the
selection of and the emphasis put upon historical sources.
But it must be admitted on all sides that the sufferings of
the Scotch inhabitants of Ulster, particularly during the
troubles of 1641 and 1689, were such as to be now almost
unbelievable.
James Crawford, the writer’s first American ancestor,
married Elizabeth Campbell, daughter of George Campbell
of Londonderry. Her grandmother, then a little girl,
was living with her parents in Londonderry. During the
rebellion of 1641 the enemy came in the night, burned
the house, and killed her father and motherr She escaped
from the chamber window in her night clothes and was
the only one of her family saved from death. She wandered
in the fields and bogs for days, living on roots. While
wandering alone she saw a “company of murderers” and
took refuge under a bridge over which they passed. Finally
she was found and cared for by friends. Elizabeth’s sister,
Margaret, married Hugh Crawford, a nephew of James.
It was she, when an old lady, who told her grandson,
Honorable Ingoldsby Work Crawford, of Union, Connecticut,
then a little boy, the story of her grandmother’s
sad and terrible experience in that awful time. Neither of
these fine old grandmothers hesitated to state with the
utmost frankness who the enemy were.

page 62-63
The early migrants from Ulster were mostly from the
Counties of Donegal, Londonderry, and Tyrone, with
some few from Down and Fermanagh. The ships sailed
largely from the northern ports — Londonderry, Belfast,
Donegal, and Coleraine.
Among the Crawfords of that day there were: —
Hugh of Donegal, among whose descendants were men of
ability in Ireland, Canada, and South Africa
Robert, descendants at Sparmount
Aaron, Coppy (Coppagh), settled in Rutland, Massachusetts
Moses, Enniskillen, died on voyage, son James settled in New
York, Crawford County
John, Castle Dawson, sailor, died in Boston
Alexander, settled in Oakham, Massachusetts
John, born in Donegore
Oliver, born in Donagheady
Thomas, born in Belfast
Thomas, born in Belfast
William, born in Omagh
(The last five all settled in Worcester County, Massachusetts.)
John, who came to Boston in 1732; his family died out in the
third generation, except son Hugh
James, his brother, Londonderry, ancestor of the Vermont
Crawfords
Hugh (John’s son), ancestor of the Connecticut Crawfords
Daniel, pew-holder in church at Charleston, South Carolina
Archibald, ruling elder, Ballycarry
John, same, Donegore (may be above John)
Malcolm, same, Donegore
Oliver, same, Donaghaddy (see above)
Robert, same, Carrickfergus
Thomas, merchant at Belfast (see above)
Thomas, ruling elder, Belfast (see above)
William, commissioner at Belfast
William, ruling elder, Omagh (see above).
William, same, in Brigh
There was a Crawford, first name unknown, at Merrymeeting
Bay, Maine, birthplace unknown.
It may be interesting to note that there are towns called
“Crawford” in the following States: Colorado, Georgia,
Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, Nebraska, Ohio,
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington; and towns called
“Crawfordsville” in Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana,
and Oregon. There are also eighteen counties in the
United States named “Crawford.”

The FamilySearch tree also supports a number of Crawford immigrants. I did a search for David Crawford born 1625 in Scotland and dying 1704 in Virginia setting the birthplace and deathplace to exact. That produced a list of over 60 people with the Crawford surname who were born in Scotland and died in Virginia.

While it is fairly obvious that the information in the Crawford Family History book is inaccurate, it is also obvious that I’m still not close to figuring out my Crawford lineage.

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 

 It’s Saturday Night again – 

Time for some more Genealogy Fun!!

Come on, everybody, join in and accept the mission and execute it with precision. 

1)  What genealogy resources are you currently using? Books, periodicals, manuscripts, ephemera, websites, software, or ???

2) Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment on this post, or in a Facebook post.  Please leave a link on this post if you write your own blog post.

Thank you to Linda Stufflebean for suggesting this topic.

Here’s mine:

While this might seem like an easy question to answer, it is actually complicated. It is complicated because, I use a lot of different resources.

When it comes to software, I regularly use

  • RootsMagic 8 to keep track of my genealogy database
  • Scrivener to transcribe records and track notes by surname/location
  • Adobe PDF
  • Windows Snipping Tool
  • Microsoft Word and Excel

During the past week or so, I’ve used the following resources:

  • digital books on Archive.org – Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, volume 1
  • digital books on FamilySearch – Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, volumes 2 and 3
  • Seneca, Kansas newspaper – http://seneca.advantage-preservation.com/
  • Warren county, Indiana newspapers on Newspaperarchives.com
  • Newspapers.com
  • Books (yes actual books) like Crawford Family History and “First Census” of Kentucky 1790
  • Kentucky tax lists prior to 1800
  • yDNA / Crawford Project
  • Facebook groups — particularly Clan Crawford Association Ancestry & DNA research forum
  • Genealogical Society journals
  • Genealogy blogs via my Feedly feed

Websites I regularly use for research:

I share my research via

Saturday Tidbits

Courier Tribune
28 Nov 1940
page 2

Defense Program Takes Higgins from Teaching

Arlie Higgins is a former Seneca young man who is called from school work by the national defense program. Arlie has been high school principal at Florence, Kansas, where he has taught three years. He is a member of the Reserve Offices corps of the army as well as a teacher and the army now comes first. Arlie was here the first week to visit his mother, Mrs. W. H. Higgins, then went on to Fort Crook, Nebr., where he has been assigned as captain of the 3rd. infantry. He is called for a year’s duty. He will look for a place to live at Ft. Crook and then he and his wife will move their household goods from Florence.

Obituary Clipping

Obituary clipping that my grandmother kept and passed it down to me

Israel
Daisy Pearl Ricketts was born in Clinton County, Ind., July 29 1873, and departed this life Sept. 19, 1930, at her home in Yates Center, Kansas.
She was united in marriage to Grant Israel, April 15, 1894. To this union a little girl was born, which died in infancy.
She came to Kansas with her parents when she was 4 years old. She had resided in Yates Center for the past 15 years. Several years ago she united with the United Brethren church at Crandall, and had always lived a christian’s life.
She leaves to mourn her loss her husband, 3 sisters and 2 brothers: Mrs. Artie Briles, of Yates Center; Mrs. Mae Cokely, of Iola; Mrs. Belle Howell, of Oakland, Calif. Manford Ricketts, of Hutchinson, and Desmond Ricketts, of Vernon; nieces and nephews, Osmund Briles, of Buffalo; Mrs. Ethel Smith, of Hutchinson; Glen Briles, of Vernon; Mrs. Lulu Cope, of Yates Center; Roy Howell, of Oakland, Calif.; Hazel Yoho, of Crandall; Roscoe, Max and Jennie Lucile Ricketts, of Vernon; Floyd Israel, of Chillicoth, Oho, and a host of friends and relatives.
The passing of Mrs. Israel leaves a vacancy in her home and surroundings that no one can fill. She never thought of her suffering, always trying to comfort someone else, and to know her was to lover her. It seems all loving cre was done, but her Saviour had called her home, He who doeth all things well.
“I cannot say, I will not say,
That she is dead, she is just away.
With a cheery smile and a wave of the hand,
She has wandered into a beautiful land,
And left us dreaming how very fair,
It needs must be, since she lingers there.

Mrs. Grant Israel, who formerly lived int he south part of Coffey county, died at 7 o’clock Friday evening, Sept. 19, 1930, at her home in Yates Center. She was, before her marriage, Pearl Rickett, and was well known in this county. Mrs. Israel was a sister-in-law of John and Harve Israel. She had been sick for the past six weeks. Burlington Republican

Low Dutch

Have you ever felt like finding one ancestor opens a door to an abundance of historical information about a group of ancestors? That’s the experience I’m having after finding a small thread of information connecting Rachel Harris Currey to her father, Peter Harris and grandfather, Daniel Harris.

While the HARRIS surname is likely of English origin, many of Rachel’s ancestors trace their roots back to the Dutch settlement of New York. Several of these Dutch settlers appear to have migrated together, going first to New Jersey. From New Jersey, they migrated to the Conowago settlement in Pennsylvania and then to Kentucky where they are known as the ‘Low Dutch Settlement’.

Using the term, ‘low dutch’, I was able to locate a wealth of information about these settlements and the families in The Gettysburg Times on Newspapers.com. While there could be more that I didn’t find, I’ve identified three different sets of articles published in 1925, 1942 and 1961. Below is a list of what I found. (Note: I took liberty with some of the references to identify the subject of the article.)

1925

  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of the Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 1,” The Gettysburg Times, 31 Aug 1925, page 4
  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of The Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 2,” The Gettysburg Times, Sept 7, 1925, page 4
  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of the Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 3,” The Gettysburg Times, 14 Sep 1925, page 4
  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of the Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 4,” The Gettysburg Times, 21 Sep 1925, page 4
  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of The Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 5,” The Gettysburg Times, 28 Sep 1925, page 4
  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of the Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 6,” The Gettysburg Times, 5 Oct 1925, page 4
  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of The Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 7,” The Gettysburg Times, 12 Oct 1925, page 4
  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of the Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 8,” The Gettysburg Times, 19 Oct 1925 page 4
  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of the Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 9,” The Gettysburg Times, 26 Oct 1925, page 4
  • Demarest, Rev., Dr., “History of the Low Dutch Colony of Conowago: Chapter 10,” The Gettysburg Times, 2 Nov 1925, page 4
  • Demarest, Rev. Dr., “History of the Low Dutch Colony of Conowago,” The Gettysburg Times, 3 Nov 1925, page 3

1941-1942

  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County: No. 196” The Gettysburg Times, 14 Jun 1941, page 4.
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 223 The Children of the Fifth David Demaree,” The Gettysburg Times, 10 Jan 1942, page 4
  • MacPherson, B. V., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 224 Last of the Demarees,” The Gettysburg Times, 17 Jan 1942, page 4
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 225 – The Bard Family Captured by Indians,” The Gettysburg Times, 24 Jan 1942, page 4
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 230 More Indian History,” The Gettysburg Times, 28 Feb 1942, page 4
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 231 Ancestry of Mary Cassatt,” The Gettysburg Times, 7 Mar 1942, page 4
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County: Odds and Ends of Low Dutch History- Cosine” The Gettysburg Times, 14 March 1942, page 4.
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County: No. 235 – The Monfort Brothers,” The Gettysburg Times, 4 Apr 1942, page 6.
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 236 The Monfort Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 11 Apr 1942, page 8
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County: No. 237 Monfort Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 18 Apr 1942, page 6.
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 238 – The Lashells Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 25 Apr 1942, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. V., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 139 More about the Lashells Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 2 May 1942, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County: No. 240 Families in the Low Dutch Settlement,” The Gettysburg Times, 9 May 1942 page 6.
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 241 Jan and Catriena Kouenover,” The Gettysburg Times, 16 May 1942, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 242 Wilhelmus and Elizabeth Hooghtelain,” The Gettysburg Times, 22 May 1942, page 14
  • MacPherson, B. F., “Backgrounds of Adams County, No. 243 Two Thomas Barton Letters,” The Gettysburg Times, 6 Jun 1942, page 8

1952

  • “A Bit of History about Your Own Adams County,” The Gettysburg Times, 4 Dec 1952 page 15.

1960-1961

  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Indian Captives Returned,” The Gettysburg times, 28 Mar 1960, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: The ‘Low Dutch’ Settlement,” The Gettysburg Times, 4 Apr 1960 , page 4.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: The Holland Dutch and French Hugeunots,” The Gettysburg Times, 11 Apr 1960, page 6.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Brikerhoff,” The Gettysburg Times, 18 Apr 1960, page 6.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Low Dutch Burials,” 23 Apr 1960, page 3
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: The Lashells Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 30 Apr 1960, page 4
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Big of History about Early Settlers: Buffalo Crossroads Graveyard,” The Gettysburg Times, page 7.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Lashells,” The Gettysburg Times, 14 May 1960, page 8.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of Early History about Early Settlers: Cossart,” Teh Gettysburg Times, 21 May 1960, page 5.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Cassatt” The Gettysburg Times, 30 May 1960, page 7.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Cassatt,” The Gettysburg Times, 4 Jun 1960, page 7.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Osborn Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 11 Jun 1960 page 3.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Fled Wyoming,” The Gettysburg Times, 18 Jun 1960, page 7
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Frontier Warfare,” The Gettysburg Times, 16 Jul 1960, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Gen Hand,” The Gettysburg Times, 23 Jul 1960, page 10
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Coleman Tragedy,” The Gettysburg Times, 15 Aug 1960, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Low Dutch,” The Gettysburg Times, 23 Aug 1960, page 5
  • MacPherson, B. F. M. “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Osborn,” The Gettysburg Times, 31 Aug 1960 page 10.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Van Arsdal,” 2 sep 1960, page 8
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Demaree,” The Gettysburg Times, 12 Sep 1960, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Demaree,” The Gettysburg Times, 17 Sep 1960, page 4
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Girty,” The Gettysburg Times, 26 Sep 1960, page 12
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Girty,” The Gettysburg Times, 22 Oct 1960, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Fort Granville,” 30 Oct 1960, page 7
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: The Graves of the Demaree Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 5 Nov 1960, page 23.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Demaree,” 5 Nov 1960, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Monfort Family,” Gettysburg Times, 12 Nov 1960 page 3.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Monforts,” 19 Nov 1960, page 2
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Random Low Dutch Notes,” The Gettysburg Times, 28 Nov 1960 page 6.
  • MaPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Van Arsdal,” The Gettysburg Times, 3 Dec 1960, page 2.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Johnson-Van Arsdal Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 14 Dec 1960, page 10.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Bercaw,” The Gettysburg Times, 19 Dec 1960, page 8.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Bercaw,” 28 Dec 1960, page 8
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers; Bercaw,” 31 Dec 1960, page 3
  • MacPherson, B. F. M. “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: The Kouenover (Conover) Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 7 Jan 1961, page 9.
  • MacPherson, B. F.,M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Again – The Low Dutch (Conover),” The Gettysburg Times, 25 Feb 1961, page 6.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about early Settlers: The Brinkerhoff Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 10 Mar 1961, page 10
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Brinkerhoff,” The Gettysburg Times, 13 March 1961, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History About Early Setters: More Brinkerhoff Genealogy,” The Gettysburg Times, 20 Mar 1961 page 7.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: The Low Dutch Move On (Brinkerhoff),” The Gettysburg Times, 29 March 1961 page 7.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History About Early Settlers; Brinkerhoffs,” The Gettysburg Times, 10 Apr 1961, page 10
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: More Brinkerhoffs,” The Gettysburg Times, 19 Apr 1961, page 6
  • MacPherson, B. F. M. “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Jan, Pieter, and Cornelius Cosine,” The Gettysburg Times, 4 May 1961, page 12.
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers; Cosine Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 11 May 1961, page 17
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Marie (Cox) Penn,” The Gettysburg Times, 13 May 1961, page 10
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Robeson,” The Gettysburg Times, 29 Jul 1961, page 12
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlrs: The Saltzgiver Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 7 Aug 1961, page 7
  • MacPherson, B. F. M. “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Van Duyn Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 14 Aug 1961, page 7
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Grave Charles Thomson,” The Gettysburg Times, 19 Aug 1961, page 11
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Lt. Wilhelmus Houghton, ” The Gettysburg Times, 25 Oct 1961, page 9
  • MacPherson, B. F, M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: Hooghtelin Family,” The Gettysburg Times, 26 Oct 1961, page 8
  • MacPherson, B. F. M., “A Bit of History about Early Settlers: The Hooghtelin Famaily,” The Gettysburg Times, 26 Oct 1961, page 8

The ‘low dutch’ search term also found articles in Kentucky papers.

  • Edwards, Brenda S., “Dutch Left Marks on Mercer,” The Kentucky Advocate Magazine 15 May 1983 page 3
  • Crawford, Byron, “Remnant Survives of Dutch Settlement,” The Courier-Journal, 20 Aug 2003, page B6.
  • Crawford, Byron, “Low Dutch Meeting House Rises Again,” The Courier-Journal (Louisville, KY) 5 Nov 2004 page B1.
  • “Dutch Cousins to Gather in Mercer: Early Kentucky History to Be Studied,” The Advocate-Messenger, 31 Aug 2005, page 2.
  • “Dutch Treat: Cousins Plan Reunion in September,” The Advocate-Messenger 18 Mar 2007 page 30.
  • “Dutch Cousins Coming to Harrodsburg,” The Advocate-Messenger” 18 Aug 2009, page 2
  • Leonard, Carolyn B., “Low Dutch Gather in Kentucky This Week,” The Advocate-Messenger, 27 Sep 2011, page 2.
  • Leonard, Carolyn B., “The Low Dutch Cousins Are Coming,” The Advocate-Messenger, 4 Aug 2013 page 23
  • Auchampaugh, Laurel, “From Conewago to Owasco and Back,” The Citizen (Auburn, NY), 23 April 2017, page C1.

Anyone with ancestral lines going back to the Dutch settlement of New York may find a wealth of historical and family information in these articles. My dream is to find similar articles about the Crawford family’s settlement in western Virginia and Kentucky!

Tenuous Connections

Do you have a branch of your tree that is hanging on by a thread? I’m not talking about a brick wall, but a branch with ancestors identified but finding documentation has proven to be difficult.

That’s my situation with the ancestors of Rachel Harris Currey. To be honest, I don’t have a lot of documentation supporting Rachel Harris as the mother of my 2nd great grandfather, Hiram Currey (1835-1901). While I had identified Rachel Harris as the wife of Hiram Currey of Peoria, Illinois, it wasn’t until I transcribed the papers for a land dispute that I realized those papers helped document Rachel Harris as the wife of Hiram Currey.

In those documents, Harris Whitaker is a witness to a statement indicating that Hiram M. Currey “raised a crop in the south west fractional qr of Sec 5 in town 10 North of Range 9 East.” Later in the documents, a statement by William M C Bogardus identifies either Harris Whitaker or James Cannon as a son of Hiram Currey

and further one of the witnesses is Curry’s own son;

https://heartlandgenealogy.wordpress.com/2022/10/04/land-dispute-2/

In 1824, a Hiram M. Curry married a Rachel Whitaker in Edgar County, Illinois.

I John W. McReynolds a licensed Minister of
the gospel of the Methodist Episcopal Church do here
by certify that by virtue of a license issued by the
Clerk of the Commissioners Court of Edgar County I
joined together in the holy state of Matrimony Hiram
M. Curry and Rachel Whitaker on the twenty eighth
day of September 1824 – given under my hand
and seal the 4th day of October 1824
J S McReynolds (seal)
Licensed Minister

Edgar County Illinois, marriage no. Book, LA page 2 (28 September 1824), Hiram M. Curry and Rachel Whitaker; Clerk of the Commissioner’s Court, Paris, Illinois.

I believe that the Rachel Whitaker of the Edgar County, Illinois marriage license was a widow at the time of the above marriage and that her married name was Harris. In 1820, a Rachel Harris married Andrew Miller in Switzerland County, Indiana.

March 22 1820 Granted marriage license to Miller Whittaker and Rachel Harris, Joseph Taque’s being first sworn who was a subscribing witness to Peter Harris’ consent

“Indiana Marriages, 1811-2019,” database with images, FamilySearch (familysearch.org : viewed online July 2017), Miller Whitaker – Rachel Harris.

These marriage records in combination with the statements in the land dispute point to Hiram Currey’s wife being Rachel Harris, daughter of Peter Harris. And that’s where the documentation holding this branch of my tree together gets even thinner. So far, I haven’t found anything connecting Peter to Rachel beyond the marriage record. Nor, have I found anything connecting Peter to parents or siblings.

However, other trees, including the FamilySearch tree have identified Peter’s wife and the ancestors of Rachel Harris Whitaker Currey.

That small thread connecting Hiram Currey of Peoria to Rachel Harris Whitaker opened up a treasure trove of potential ancestors. While I need to locate documentation to support all of these ancestors, I do have evidence that supports my relationship to Rachel and her ancestors: DNA.

When I searched my matches for the BANTA surname, one of my matches shares 29 cm with me. Thus, I was hoping to see a BANTA in her tree leading to a common ancestor. Instead, the CRAWFORD surname jumped out at me. When I scrolled down, I found that we share quite a few surnames with SMITH and THOMPSON being on the list.

Because my tree is heavily colonial, I often encounter this multitude of potential connections. While I may connect with the above match on the BANTA line, that is one of quite a few possible connections. Thus, I rely on Ancestry’s ThruLines to help find those common ancestors.

Since I have added Rachel’s parents and grandparents to my tree, Ancestry’s ThruLines has uncovered DNA matches to descendants of her grandparents. Below is a chart showing the number of matches from other lines to these potential ancestors.

AncestorMy LineBranches
Rachel Harris7 thru Hiram Currey (1835-1901)7 thru Caroline Currey
Peter Harris13 thru Rachel Harris
Rachel S. VanArsdale13 thru Rachel Harris
Daniel Harris7 thru Peter Harris3 thru Annie Harris; 2 thru Samuel N. Harris
and 2 thru Ellen Harris
Elizaeth Demaree7 thru Peter Harris3 thru Annie Harris; 2 thru Samuel N. Harris
and 2 thru Ellen Harris
Simon G. VarArsdale7 thru my line1 thru Jane VanArsdale; 11 thru Jacob V Osdol;
3 thru Lucretia Van Ausdall; 16 thru Eleanor S V Arsdaele;
3 thru Theodore W. Vanosdol and 10 thru Anna Van Arsdale
Rachel Banta7 thru my line1 thru Jane VanArsdale; 11 thru Jacob V Osdol;
3 thru Lucretia Van Ausdall; 16 thru Eleanor S V Arsdaele;
3 thru Theodore W. Vanosdol and 10 thru Anna Van Arsdale
6 thru Maria H Williamson (child of 1st marriage)

Below are images from Ancestry’s ThruLines showing the potential DNA connections for Rachel’s ancestors using my DNA results.

I realize that without a chromosome browser to compare all of these results, I cannot use DNA to prove that I am related to these potential ancestors. In the meantime, I have a lot of ancestors to document!

Why Do-Over?

Have you ever wondered why genealogists might throw out years of work to start over? Or, have you wondered why other genealogists might elect to go back thru their previous work versus trying to break down brick walls?

A couple of genealogy blogs that I follow have pointed out some reasons for undertaking such a process.

In Jacqi Stevens post, Broyles Roots: If You Know, You Know on her A Family Tapestry blog, my (distant) cousin talks about her goal to update her research of Adam Broyles. She points out how the The Broyles Family by Arthur Leslie Keith provided a starting point for her BROYLES research but that she has not depended on it. Instead, she has been carefully working her way thru the generations. Not only are records more readily available now but DNA results can also help document these generational connections.

In Linda Stufflebeam’s recent Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post on her Empty Branches on the Family Tree blog, she discusses one of her 2023 goals which also requires ‘going over’. This goal is to ‘clean up her source citations’. While I know that this should be one of my goals, I have been reluctant to name it as a goal due to the size of such a project. Thus, I wish her luck!

Since one of my goals involves adding/updating biographies for my ancestral line to WikiTree, I’m also going back thru my research. When I created a narrative report for my grandparents, Edward Osmund Briles [LWYR-98X] and Pauline Mentzer [LWYR-9DX], I discovered an excellent example of why I need to pursue this process. With the availability of newspapers and census records in Kansas, I not only have a lot of facts for my grandparents but also an abundance of sources. This report revealed the following types of issues that need ‘cleaned’ up before copying the information to WikiTree.

  • Place abbreviations — Since I use standard place names, the report prints ‘United States’ for every fact which gets monotonous. By adding an abbreviation to the place, I can cause the report to print Coffey County, Kansas instead of Coffey, Kansas United States. Updating this is a two step process:
    • Adding abbreviation to place
    • Making sure the sentence uses the abbreviation for the place
  • Sentences –
    • extra space between words – “He owned” or missing space “In 1954,he”
    • too many words – “he was a ran a threshing”
    • missing information – “In Jun 1922, he .”
  • Facts that could be combined
  • Citations
    • Two or more citations to same source that can be merged
    • Missing information
    • Reference to a newspaper clipping when citation to digital copy exists
    • Extra punctuation

While it will take some time to get this report ‘cleaned up’, the resulting report will allow me to share my grandfather’s story on WikiTree.

Checklists

Do you use a source checklist in your genealogy research? I have to admit that it has been YEARS since I used such a tool. However, when I first started researching my family, those checklists served as my guide.

A quick Google search for genealogy checklists led me to several resources:

While I feel like my research efforts have included a wide variety of sources, a statement on the Family Tree Magazine site caught my attention.

Think you’ve hit a brick wall? Don’t assume you’re stuck yet — use this rundown of record types to guide you to other records you haven’t checked.

Perhaps I need to create a checklist for my Crawford brick wall research!