Friday Finds

One of the clippings in the BRILES materials I received from Mildred Barby was an article about her father, Lon Briles, reminiscing about playing baseball as a youth.

Adams News

Pro’s Cousin Recalls Players
By Mrs. Roy Calhoun
Lon Briles noticed the picture of his cousin, Nelson Briles, in a newspaper recently. Nelson has been the pitcher for the St. Louis Cards and was traded to the Pittsburg Pirates and is now in practice at Bradenton, Fla.
Reading and seeing Nelson’s picture in the news brought memories to Lon who used to play baseball with the players in and around the Adams Community and with his brother Earl Briles.
Some of the outstanding players of his days are now deceased, but he listed them as: Hooker — Roy Russell, D. Gill, Jess BIll, Bill Snell and Ed Grounds; Turpin – George Whitmer and Frank Elixson; Gray – Jim and Grant Couch; Adams — Clyde Miller, Vern Miller, Jacke Stebens, John Houston, Harvey George, Jim Taylor, Jeff Sapp, Earl Briles; Hardesty — Walter Hale, Earnest Boles; Liberal — O. J. Wilkins, Will, Loemings, Ed Watson , Elmer Vaugh and Howard Mann.
Those living are: Tyrone — Harry Riff, Ray Whitmer, Frank Winkerman; Hardesty — Marlin and Jay Hale, Charley Calvert; Adams — Fred Stebens and Emmet Tourner (now of Pampa, Tax.); Hooker — George Risen and Alex Hill.
Lon pitched and his brother Earl caught. They enjoyed many happy times together along with their many friends.
At the age of 86, Lon can still recall clearly how they wen to and from the games. Walking was common, but horseback, buggies and wagons along with bicycles were their main source.
Hew made the statement that he had made $7.50 pitching and his brother Earl $5 for catching a game at Mullinsville, Kan.
Times have changed the picture for ball players. They receive fabulous wages and many experiences.
Lon and his wife Elsie have celebrated their 64th wedding anniversary (March 7, 1971) and still enjoy their friends, but both are in poor health.

Thanks to Kenneth Marks’ list of Oklahoma Online Historical Newspapers, I was able to locate the article in the Guyman Daily Herald. This newspaper was digitized by the Guyman Public Library.

Guyman Daily Herald, April 10, 1971, page 10 – http://guymon.advantage-preservation.com/

Information about the baseball player, Nelson Briles can be found on Wikipedia. For more information, check out the References links at the bottom of the Wikipedia article.

Obituary Clipping

Obituary clipping that my grandmother kept and passed it down to me

Israel
Daisy Pearl Ricketts was born in Clinton County, Ind., July 29 1873, and departed this life Sept. 19, 1930, at her home in Yates Center, Kansas.
She was united in marriage to Grant Israel, April 15, 1894. To this union a little girl was born, which died in infancy.
She came to Kansas with her parents when she was 4 years old. She had resided in Yates Center for the past 15 years. Several years ago she united with the United Brethren church at Crandall, and had always lived a christian’s life.
She leaves to mourn her loss her husband, 3 sisters and 2 brothers: Mrs. Artie Briles, of Yates Center; Mrs. Mae Cokely, of Iola; Mrs. Belle Howell, of Oakland, Calif. Manford Ricketts, of Hutchinson, and Desmond Ricketts, of Vernon; nieces and nephews, Osmund Briles, of Buffalo; Mrs. Ethel Smith, of Hutchinson; Glen Briles, of Vernon; Mrs. Lulu Cope, of Yates Center; Roy Howell, of Oakland, Calif.; Hazel Yoho, of Crandall; Roscoe, Max and Jennie Lucile Ricketts, of Vernon; Floyd Israel, of Chillicoth, Oho, and a host of friends and relatives.
The passing of Mrs. Israel leaves a vacancy in her home and surroundings that no one can fill. She never thought of her suffering, always trying to comfort someone else, and to know her was to lover her. It seems all loving cre was done, but her Saviour had called her home, He who doeth all things well.
“I cannot say, I will not say,
That she is dead, she is just away.
With a cheery smile and a wave of the hand,
She has wandered into a beautiful land,
And left us dreaming how very fair,
It needs must be, since she lingers there.

Mrs. Grant Israel, who formerly lived int he south part of Coffey county, died at 7 o’clock Friday evening, Sept. 19, 1930, at her home in Yates Center. She was, before her marriage, Pearl Rickett, and was well known in this county. Mrs. Israel was a sister-in-law of John and Harve Israel. She had been sick for the past six weeks. Burlington Republican

Why Do-Over?

Have you ever wondered why genealogists might throw out years of work to start over? Or, have you wondered why other genealogists might elect to go back thru their previous work versus trying to break down brick walls?

A couple of genealogy blogs that I follow have pointed out some reasons for undertaking such a process.

In Jacqi Stevens post, Broyles Roots: If You Know, You Know on her A Family Tapestry blog, my (distant) cousin talks about her goal to update her research of Adam Broyles. She points out how the The Broyles Family by Arthur Leslie Keith provided a starting point for her BROYLES research but that she has not depended on it. Instead, she has been carefully working her way thru the generations. Not only are records more readily available now but DNA results can also help document these generational connections.

In Linda Stufflebeam’s recent Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post on her Empty Branches on the Family Tree blog, she discusses one of her 2023 goals which also requires ‘going over’. This goal is to ‘clean up her source citations’. While I know that this should be one of my goals, I have been reluctant to name it as a goal due to the size of such a project. Thus, I wish her luck!

Since one of my goals involves adding/updating biographies for my ancestral line to WikiTree, I’m also going back thru my research. When I created a narrative report for my grandparents, Edward Osmund Briles [LWYR-98X] and Pauline Mentzer [LWYR-9DX], I discovered an excellent example of why I need to pursue this process. With the availability of newspapers and census records in Kansas, I not only have a lot of facts for my grandparents but also an abundance of sources. This report revealed the following types of issues that need ‘cleaned’ up before copying the information to WikiTree.

  • Place abbreviations — Since I use standard place names, the report prints ‘United States’ for every fact which gets monotonous. By adding an abbreviation to the place, I can cause the report to print Coffey County, Kansas instead of Coffey, Kansas United States. Updating this is a two step process:
    • Adding abbreviation to place
    • Making sure the sentence uses the abbreviation for the place
  • Sentences –
    • extra space between words – “He owned” or missing space “In 1954,he”
    • too many words – “he was a ran a threshing”
    • missing information – “In Jun 1922, he .”
  • Facts that could be combined
  • Citations
    • Two or more citations to same source that can be merged
    • Missing information
    • Reference to a newspaper clipping when citation to digital copy exists
    • Extra punctuation

While it will take some time to get this report ‘cleaned up’, the resulting report will allow me to share my grandfather’s story on WikiTree.

Friday Finds

This week’s installment of Friday Finds is from a newspaper clipping saved by my Briles cousin, Mildred Barby.

Corning’s Briles Is on Committee
Des Moines — Lt. Gov. Terry E. Branstad has appointed Sen. James Briles of Corning to a Legislative Conference Committee.
The Committee will discuss a bill relating to the service of county supervisors on agencies and boards, and the payment of township trustees.
Senator Briles’ appointment by Branstad is extremely important because this committee will determine the final version of the bill for passage.
When a bill reaches a Conference Committee it has been passed by both houses of the legislature, but in different forms. Senator Briles is in his fourth term representing District 48 after serving eight years in the Iowa House of Representatives.
He is Chairman of the County Government Committee and Vice-Chairman of the Cities Committee. He also serves on the Energy and Judiciary Committees.

“Corning’s Briles Is on Committee,” undated clipping, from unidentified newspaper; Briles / Rush Genealogy Records, photocopy given to Marcia Philbrick; privately held 2000 by Mildred Barby, Oklahoma.

Iowa Governor Terry Branstad served from 1983 to 1999. Thus, the above article about Senator James Briles would be from that time period.

A simple Google search uncovered the following sites with information about James E. Briles

University of Kansas, Dole Archive Collections (https://dolearchivecollections.ku.edu/collections : viewed online 7 January 2023), Leading Iowa State Senator Endorses Dole.

Using the information on the Find A Grave site, I was able to locate James E Briles on the FamilySearch tree. When I displayed his tree, I found why Mildred Barby saved this article. Our common ancestor is Frederick Briles of Randolph County, North Carolina.

While I haven’t been able to locate the article on Newspapers.com, I was able to locate an obituary for Senator Briles.

Corning’s former state Sen. Briles dies
By Ann Bittinger

Former Iowa Sen. James E. Briles, 66, of Corning died of complications of cancer Saturday at Clarkson Hospital in Omaha.
Other former senators remember Briles as an expert in county government who knew the details of his legislation.
Briles was so familiar with his bills that when other senators were mistaken abut details. Briles would turn to the assembly and say, “Read the bills, Senator. Read the bills,” said former Senate majority leader George Kinley.
“That was his famous saying,” Kinley said.
Briles was one of the best senators at introducing his bills early in the session to make sure they would be debated, Kinley said. He remembered Briles for his chairmanship of teh COunty Government Committee.
Former Sen. Eugene Hill remembered Briles as a “jovial character” who was an expert in agricultural legislation.
Briles was born in Prescott and lived in Corning since 1949. He served int he Iowa House of Representative eight years and was elected to the Senate in 1965. He held the Senate seat until his retirement in 1984. Briles also was involved in real estate for more than 30 years and was an auctioneer for 33 years.
He was a decorated Army veteran of World War II and was a member of the Ourcq Post of American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars.
He is survived by his wife, Marilyn; three daughters, Dory Briles of Des Moines, Mary Briles of Corning and Coleen Schieffer of Caladonia, Minn.; five sons, Ed, of Buhl, Idaho, Jim of Terra Ceia Fla., tom of Kansas City, Mo., Rick Jessen of Nodaway; a brother, Harvey of Creston, and nine grandchildren.
Services will be at 3 p.m. Thursday at the Corning United Methodist Church, of which Briles was a member. Burial will be at Cromwell Cemetery near Creston.
Friends may call after 9 a.m. today at Coen-Beaty Funeral Home in Corning. Memorial contributions may be made to the Corning American Legion Scholarship Fund.

“Corning’s former state Sen. Briles dies,” The Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa), 13 July 1992, page 2; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 7 January 2022).

Friday Finds

Ottawa Herald
Dec. 28, 1966
page 8

Clipping in materials received from Mildred (Briles) Barby

Deaths
John C. Briles

John Charles Briles, 73, retired farmer of rural Pomona, died at 2 p.m. Tuesday, in Broomfield, Colo., at the home of a daughter, where he had been visiting for a week.
Services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, at the Richter Methodist Church of which he was an active member, Rev. Charles P. Knight will officiate. Burial will be in Highland Cemetery. Friends may call at the Lamb Funeral Home after 7 p.m., Thursday.
He was born Feb. 8, 1893, at Trinity, N.C., the son of John and Effie (Welborn) Briles. On Dec. 19, at Pomona, he married Dessie Duvall.
He had lived in the Richter and Pomona areas since moving from North Carolina at the age of 21. He had lived on the present farm since 1931.
Surviving are his wife; four daughters, Mrs. Pat Apgar, Marshaltown, Iowa, Mrs. Kenneth Gentry, 926 Ash, Mrs. Dan Gardner, Hartford, and Mrs. Charles Swenson, Broomfield, Colo.; 15 grandchildren; three sisters, Mrs. Ettie Welborn and Mrs Enos Skeen, Trinity, N.C. and Mrs. Cleveland Kennedy, Hillsboro, N.C. and three brothers, Dalton Briles and Austin Briles, Greensboro, N.C. and Tom Briles, Paducah, Ky.

Funeral Program

In Memory of
John Charles Briles
Born
February 8, 1893
Trinity, North Carolina
Passed Away
December 27, 1966
Broomfield, Colorado
Services Held
Richter Methodist Church
Franklin County, Kansas
December 31, 1966
Clergyman
Rev. Charles P. Knight
First Methodist Church
Interment
Highland Cemetery
Ottawa, Kansas

Friday Finds

Ottawa Herald
June 15, 1976
page 6-A

Clipping in materials received from Mildred (Briles) Barby

From Broil to Broyles to Broles to Briles
By Joan Istas
The year was 1717. Johannes Broil had just come to America from Alsace, Germany.
He located in Germanna Colony in Virginia and he started a line of descendants that changed the name of Broil to Broyles, then Broles, and finally to Briles.
Nelson Briles, Ottawa RFD 2, is one of those descendants. Briles lives on a small farm east of Ottawa on K-68.
It’s a farm that doesn’t seem to have changed much in the times it has been passed down through the generations from Grandfather John Broyles, to Father William C. Briles to Mother Mary Elizabeth Briles and finally to Nelson Briles.
The acreage has changed little since the first Briles occupied it, the farm buildings remain in primarily the same position as they were originally built and the crops have changed little, too.
John Broyles migrated from North Carolina to Missouri in 1847 and from there came to Kansas in 1863.
He was 48 years of age when he purchased the land now farmed by his grandson, Nelson Briles. He purchased 120 acres from Alexander Wilson at a cost of $500.
Briles believes that the U.S. government signed a treaty with the Indians in 1854 in which the land became the property of the government. In that year the land was sold to the settlers.
The 120 acres purchased by John Broyles passed through many hands in the years 1858 to 1863 when he purchased it.
Broyles added another 25 acres tot he 120 when he purchased a piece of land from a man called Adkins. Broyles wanted timber to burn for wood.
He lost an acres, however, when he donated one acre to the community to erect a schoolhouse. The school was called Briles school.
When Broyles son, William Briles inherited the land, he tore down the original house and in 1900 built the house that with a few additions, stands today.
William Briles added an additional 15 acres to the tract purchasing 15 acres adjoining the timber Broyles had purchased.
William’s two sons Clarence and Nelson attended Briles School and occasionally William and his wife Mary Elizabeth would treat the school children.
There were geese in the front yard. A little cedar was planted. An orchard provided fruit. Flas was grown to pay for the new house.
The maples thrived until the wind took them down. Part of the elms succumbed to Dutch elm disease.
The old kerosene lamps, the Aladdin lamps and the gasoline lights provided light until electricity replaced them.
William Briles died. His wife Mary Elizabeth farmed the land for a short time with the help of her son Nelson and when she died he inherited the land.
The farm now consists of 117 1/2 acres. Corn, wheat, milo and soybeans are grown. A herd of 40 cows and calves graze on the native pasture.
Nelson Briles farms the land now but he says he is the last of his family with the Briles name. His niece, Lou Ann Lindsey, is the next in line to get the farm, he says. That is if inflation doesn’t make him sell it first.

“From Broil to Broyles to Broles to Briles,” digital image, Ottawa Herald (Ottawa, Kansas), 15 June 1976, page 6A; digital images, NewspaperArchive (www.newspaperarchive.com : viewed online 31 December 2022).

Divorced Part 2

Do you remember the days of snail mail? Thanks to a comment made by a reader of my previous post, Divorced, I used snail mail to seek out copies of the marriage and application for divorce. Thanks to the kindly service of the employees in the Coffey County Clerk’s office and the office of the Clerk of the District Court Office located in Coffey County, I received copies of the records in the mail!

Alexander Briles married Elizabeth M. E[ltz]worth were married in Coffey County Kansas on May 30, 1875.

Coffey County Kansas
Fourth Judicial District of Kansas
Clerk of District Court

Marriage License
Probate Judge’s Office
Burlington, Coffey County, Kansas

May 28 A.D. 1875
To any person authorized by law to perform the Marriage Ceremony, Greeting:
You are hereby authorized to join in marriage Alexander
Briles of Neosho twp County of Coffey
State of Kansas aged 57 years, and Elizabeth
El[zsw]orth of Neosho Twp County of Coffey
State of Kansas aged 51 years; and of this License
you will make due return to my office within thirty days.
Wm. A. Allison Probate Judge

Return
State of Kansas
Coffey County
I certify that on the 30th day of May 1875, I did join in marriage the
within named Alexander Briles and Elizabeth El[t]zworth
D. T. McAuly
Minister of the Gospel
I hereby certify the above to be a true copy of Marriage License and return recorded this
31 day of May 1875
Wm A Allison Probate Judge

Coffey County Courthouse, Marriage License, , Briles – Elsworth, 30 May 1875; Fourth Judicial District of Kansas, Burlington, Kansas.

Then in 1879, Alexander Briles files for divorce in Coffey County Court. Even though these old court records were difficult to transcribe, it is obvious this was not a happy marriage.

Fourth Judicial District of Kansas
Clerk of the District Court
Coffey County Courthouse
Burlington, KS

No. 1042
Alexander Briles
Vs Elizabeth M. Briles

page 2
Alex Briles
vs
Elizabeth M Briles
1042
Filed Dec. 2
1879
R Hadam
Clerk

page 3
State of Kansas
Coffey County
In District Court
in & for said county
Alexander Briles [pltf]
vs
Elizabeth M. Briles [Deft]
The Plaintiff says
That he has been a resident in good
faith of the State of Kansas for more
than one year [las] past, and that he is
now a resident in good faith of the said
County of Coffey
That on the 30th day of May 1875
the said plaintiff and defendant
were married to each other [?]
County of Coffey
The plaintiff further [assess] that since
[?] said Marriage this plaintiff has in
all [?] [committed] himself toward said
defendant as a faithful and loving
husband
The plaintiff further says that the said defendant
has been guilty of [?] neglect of [?] neglect of [duly] [?] the place of [housekeeper]
that defendant disregar[ding] her marital duties
to this plaintiff her husband has failed
neglected and refused to cohabit with the
plaintiff her husband for the space of
more than one year last [past] and still
so neglects fails and refuses to cohabit with
this plaintiff without any just cause or
[provocation] [has as] wife no part of this plaintiff
[?] [Therefore] plaintiff prays the court that

page 4
the parties hereto named be divorced
the marriage relation [hereafter] existing
between them be annulled & set
[aside] [or] [deed] for [other] proper] sale of
R. [?] & Jenkins
Pltf attys

Alexander Briles being first duly sworn
on oath says that the [several] matters
and things set forth and aversed in the
the foregoing [?] are true
Alexander Briles

Subscribed & Sworn to before me this
2d day of December 1879
R Hadam
Clerk Dist Court

Page 5
State of Kansas
Coffey County
In District Court
[in previous] term
Alexander Briles
vs
Elizabeth M. Briles [Missouri?]
[?]
Came [here] the said defendant
and [names] the issuing and [?] of
[?] in the {cal?] [each] the [?]
and [interest] her [appearance] therein [?]
rose [cr] for to said plaintiffs position
This defendant denies each and
every allegation in said petition
[contained]
The said defendant further says
that said defendant has been a
resident in good faith of the state of
Kansas for more than one year
last past & is [lives] now at the [date] of the
filing of the petition & of the [?]
herein a resident in good faith of said
county of Coffey
Deft further says that the said plaintif
& defendant were married to each other
[in] said Coffey County on the May 30
1875 and that [?]
said marriage She has in all things
conducted herself married to

page 6
plaintiff as a faithful loving and
obedient wife
[J?] the said plaintiff [disregarding]
his duties toward [her] [f?]
his wife, has been guilty of extreme
cruelty toward this defendant
[persuance] any just cause [for his reaction]
The said defendant further says
that said plaintiff has been guilty of
gross neglect of duty towards this
defendanty his wife without any
just cause or provocation on her
part.
Whereupon this defendant prays
that she may be severed from said
plaintiff and for [this] proper relief
Elizabeth M. Briles

Elizabeth M. Briles being first
duly sworn says that the several
matters and things set forth in her
[?] are true
Elizabeth M Briles
Subscribed to & sworn before me
2d day of December 1879
E B Peyton
Judges

page 7
Filed Dec 2
1879
R Hadam
Clerk
Docket I

Fourth Judicial District of Kansas, Coffey County, Kansas, No. 1042: Alexander Briles vs. Elizabeth M. Briles, Clerk of the District Court Office, Burlington, Kansas.

While the court documents do not contain a final divorce decry, I was able to locate a newspaper article which indicates the divorce was granted.

The Burlington Patriot (Burlington, KS)
25 Dec 1879
page 2

The following is an abstract of the balance of the cases disposed of at the December term of the District Court:

Alexander Briles vs. Elizabeth W. Briles; divorce granted

“Court News,” The Burlington Patriot (Burlington, KS), 25 December 1879, page 2; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 18 September 2022).

From this experience, I’ve learned several things:

  • To keep digging for those records.
  • That snail mail still works.
  • that going back thru my research and carefully analyzing the research reveals research questions and leads to more records.

Mailbag

Do you remember the days of the SASE, putting one in a letter and then waiting for it to come back to you? (SASE: Self addressed stamped envelope) Well, even though I didn’t receive a SASE in the mail, I did receive a bounty of genealogy documents in the mail recently!

One package was from the Frankfort Community Public Library in Clinton County, Indiana and contained photocopies of probate records for my Ricketts/Reed family.

The other package was a thumb drive from Brad Quinlan. In June, he posted in the Facebook group, Descendants of Andersonville Prison, that he was making a trip to Washington, D.C. to do research and had time to take on more clients during that trip. Even though I had already requested the military and pension files for my civil war ancestors from the national archives, I did not know at the time about requesting the ENTIRE file. Not knowing what I might be missing, I elected to inquire about whether he had time to fulfill my requests. He did have time to take on my requests and a thumb drive arrived recently containing the images obtained from those files.

In both cases, there was an exchange of money. However, what I spent obtaining the records was a small percentage of what it would cost to pay travel expenses for me to obtain them myself.

I am thankful to have these records. Now, I have lots of work to do to get these transcribed!

  • Probate Record for John Ricketts (2MTW-355)
  • Partition file for John Ricketts’ estate
  • Probate record for Mary Reed (KLVH-CFM)
  • Military file for George Mentzer (LHKS-17Q)
  • Pension file for George Mentzer
  • Military file for James M. Ricketts (KV21-XBR)
  • Pension file for James M. Ricketts
  • Military file for Noah Briles (K2Q1-RG9)
  • Pension file for Noah Briles
  • Military files (3 of them) for Richmond F. Hammond (2B2M-GXK)
  • Pension file for Richmond F. Hammond
  • Military file for Washington Marion Crawford (KHFD-XRW)
  • Pension file for Washington Marion Crawford

Alexander Briles

Alexander Briles was born on 14 Mar 1817 in North Carolina, United States.13

He purchased  on 24 Apr 1838 in Randolph county, North Carolina.4 land being parcel of 240 acres John Briles purchased from Ezra Dorsett for $500 from John Briles

He lived in Randolph county, North Carolina on 1 Jun 1840.5 Alexander Briles was listed as a head of household on the 1840 census in Randolph County, North Carolina. Alexander’s household included 2 males under 5, 1 male 20-30, and 1 female 20-30.

Alexander lived in Randolph county, North Carolina on 1 Jun 1850.6 Alexr Briles was listed as the head of household on the 1850 census in Randolph County, NC. According to the census, Alexr was a 32 year old farmer born in North Carolina. Alexr owned $500 in real estate. Also listed in the household was Sarah, a 32 year old female;  Clark, a 12 year old male;  Washington, a 10 year old male; Sarah, an 8 year old female; John, a 6 year old male; Jane, a 4 year old female and Robt, an 1 year old male.

He sold land  on 1 Sep 1857 in Randolph county, North Carolina.7 land being 240 acres on waters of Little Caraway for $1000 to Robert Laughlin

He lived in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas Territory in Mar 1858.8 According to the 1859 Kansas Territorial census for Coffey County, Alex Briles settled there in March 1858.

Alexander lived in Coffey County, Kansas Territory before 1859.9

He lived in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas Territory in 1859.8,10 Alex Briles was listed on the 1859 Kansas territory census in Coffey County. According to the census, Alexander settled in Kansas in March 1858 with 8 minors in the household and a total of 10 in the household.

He lived in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas Territory in 1860.11 A. Briles was listed as a head of household on the 1860 census in Coffey County, Kansas Territory. According to the census, A. Briles, was 43 years old and born in North Carolina. He owned $800 in real estate. Also listed in the household were Sarah, D.C.,  N.W.,  S.R., J.F., Louisa, R.A., H.W., Z.R>, N.C. and B.R. Briles.

In 1860 Alexander was a farmer in Coffey, Kansas, United States.2,11

He filed land entry papers on 1 Dec 1860 in Fort Scott, Bourbon, Kansas, United States.1213

He served in the military under Captain John Douglas in Company I of the Kansas State Militia in 1864 in Kansas, United States.14 under Captain John Douglas in Company I of the Kansas State Militia

Alexander lived in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas in 1865.15 Alexander Bryles was listed in the 1865 Kansas census living in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas as a 47 year old farmer born in North Carolina. According to the census, he owned $2800 in real estate and $1300 in personal estate. Also listed in the household was his wife, Sarah Briles, a 48 year old female born in North Carolina;  Louisa Bryles, a 19 year old female born in North Carolina; Robert Bryles, a 16 year old male born in North Carolina; Harrison Bryles, a 14 year old male born in North Carolina; Zebeder Bryles, a 12 year old male born in North Carolina; Nancy Bryles, a 10 year old female born in North Carolina and Benj Bryles, a 5 year old male born in Kansas.

He sold land W1/2 NE 1/4 Section 12 Township 23 of Range 15 East on 20 Sep 1869 in Coffey County, Kansas.16

He sold land being the NE1/4 NE 1/4 Section 12 Township 23 Range 15 East on 20 Sep 1869 in Coffey County, Kansas.1718

Alexander lived in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas on 26 Jun 1870.1920 Alexander Briles is listed as a 53 year old farmer on the 1870 census living in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas. According to the census, Alexander was born in North Carolina. Also listed in the household were Sarah, a 53 year old female;  Robbert, a 21 year old male; Harrison, an 18 year old male;  Zoebede, a 16 year old male; Nancy, a 14 year old female and Benjamin, a 10 year old male.

He lived in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas on 1 Mar 1875.21 Alexander Briles was listed as the head of household on the 1875 Kansas census in Coffey County, Kansas. According to the census, Alexander was a 57 year old male farmer born in North Carolina. Alexander owned $4,000 in real estate and $1,000 in personal property. Alexander’s household included 15 year old Benj Briles.

He sold land being the SE1/4NE1/4 Section 12 Township 23 Range 15 on 31 Jan 1877 in Coffey County, Kansas.22

Alexander sold land land being the Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 Section 7 Township 23 Range 16 to Benj R. Briles on 25 Nov 1879 in Coffey County, Kansas.23

He sold land land being 30 acres in section 7 township 23 of range 16 to Elizabeth M. Briles on 22 Dec 1879 in Coffey County, Kansas.24

He lived in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas on 2 Jun 1880.25 Alex Briles was listed as a head of household on the 1880 census in Coffey county, Kansas. According to the census, Alex was a 60 year old divorced male farmer who was born in North Carolina. Alex’s household included his granddaughter, Anna Ruggles, a 13 year old female and his son, Benjamin Briles, aged 26.

Alexander lived in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas on 1 Jul 1895.26 Alex Briles is listed as a 70 year old male living in the household of H. W. Briles on the 1895 census in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas. According to the census, Alex was born in North Carolina.

He sold land  on 5 Oct 1898 in Coffey County, Kansas.27 land being 2 1/2 acres in the norhteast corner of the Northeast 1/4 Section 7 Township 23 Range 16 to Mary Ann Briles

He died on 14 Jan 1900 at the age of 82 in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas.3,2832

Alexander was buried on 15 Jan 1900 at Big Creek Cemetery in Coffey County, Kansas.3,32

ENDNOTES:

1. Broyles, John K., Keith’s Typescript with Additions, (Clinton, TN: John K. Broyles, Sr.), p. 87

2. Kansas Territorial Settlers of 1860: Part II: Born in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina, Briles born NC, 1860; database with images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 30 July 2022).

3. Find a Grave, database and images, Find a Grave (www.findagrave.com : viewed online October 2016), memorial for Alexander Briles (1817-1900), Find a Grave Memorial no. E71311048, created by Wonderer, citing Big Creek Cemetery, Coffey County, Kansas;, Alexander Briles.

4. North Carolina, Randolph County. Record of Deeds, 1779-1963.  Film #19637 DGS 7517640. Alexander Briels, 24 April 1838 Vol. 21: page 316-317; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 31 July 2022.

5. 1840 U.S. Census, Randolph County North Carolina, population scheudle, , page 22, Alexander Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017); NARA microfilm publication M704.

6. 1850 U.S. Census, Randolph County, North Carolina, population schedule, Northern Division, Randolph County, North Carolina, page 404 Image 80 of 179, household 562, Alexr Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication M432

7. North Carolina, Randolph County. Record of Deeds, 1779-1963.  Film #470234 DGS 7560693. Alexander Briles, 1 Sep 1857 Vol. 31: page 42-43; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 31 July 2022.

8. 1859 Kansas Census, Coffey County, Kansas Territory, population schedule, Neotho Township, Coffey County, Kansas Image 2 of 4, line 16, Alex. Briles; digital images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 31 July 2022)

9. Throckmorton George, et al, First Hand Historical Episodes of Early Coffey County (KS) (N.p.: n.p., maybe 195),p. 51 Early Days in the Crandall Neighborhood.  digital images, Ancestry.com, http://www.ancestry.com viewed online 31 July 2022.

10. “Kansas, Compiled Census Index, 1850-1890,” Ancestry.com,  (www.ancestry.com : viewed online (July 2017), Alexander Briles.

11. 1860 U.S. Census, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 68 Image 4 of 9, household 513, Alexander Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017); NARA microfilm publication M653

12. United States Bureau of Land Management, “General Land Office Records,” database with images, BLM.Gov (http://glorecords.blm.gov : viewed online April 2018), Briles, Alexander.

13. Kansas, Coffey County. Deed Records, 1857-1903.  Film #1510470 DGS 8561297. Alexander Briles, 2 Jan 1869 Book I: page 190; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 3 August 2022.

14. , Muster Rolls, Price’s Raid October 1864 14th thur 16th Regiments, Vol. 6 (N.p.: n.p., n.d.), page 480; digital image, Kansas Memory, kansasmemory.org viewed online 3 August 2022.

15. 1865 Kansas Census, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, Kansas state census, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 10 (image 10) Image 10 of 11, family 64, Alexander Bryles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2018)

16. Kansas, Coffey County. Deed Records, 1857-1903.  Film #1510472 GS 8561299. Alexander Briles, 20 September 1869 Vol. O: page 625 (image 321); digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 3 August 2022.

17. Kansas, Coffey County. Deed Records, 1857-1903.  Film #1510472 DGS 8561299. Alexander Briles to Noah Briles, 20 September 1869 Vol. O: page 603; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 3 August 2022.

18. Coffey County Kansas. Range Index Section 12, Township 23, Range 15 Coffey County Kansas (Briles, KS.016).

19. 1870 Agriculture Census, Coffey County, Kansas, Agriculture Schedule, , Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 4 Image 2 of 3, Alexander Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017)

20. 1870 U.S. Census, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, KS, page 9 Image 9 of 16, family 58, Alexander Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 28 October 2021); NARA microfilm publication T132

21. 1875 Kansas State Census, Coffey County, Kansas, Kansas State Census, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 12 Image 7 of 13, household 97, Alexander Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017); Kansas State Historical Society

22. Kansas, Coffey County. Deed Records, 1857-1903.  Film #1510473 DGS 8561300. Alexander Briles to Robert Briles, 31 January 1877 Vo. 17: page 542; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 3 August 2022.

23. Kansas, Coffey County. Deed Records, 1857-1903.  Film #1510476 DGS 8561303. Alexander Briles, 25 Nov 1879 Vol. 25: page 344; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 4 August 2022.

24. Kansas, Coffey County. Deed Records, 1857-1903.  Film #1510476 DGS 8561303. Alexander Briles, 2 Dec 1879 Vol. 25: page 330; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 5 August 2022.

25. 1880 U.S. Census, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, ED 49, page 4 Image 2 of 13, household 20, Alex Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017); NARA microfilm publication T9

26. 1895 Kansas Census, Coffey County, State Census, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 15, Alex Briles (in household of H. W. Briles); microfilm, Kansas State Historical Society (Topeka, KS : viewed online July 2017)

27. Kansas, Coffey County. Deed Records, 1857-1903.  Film #1510489 DGS 8561315. Alexander Briles, 5 Oct 1898 vol 57: page 486; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 4 August 2022.

28. “Kansas Deaths and Burials, Index, 1885-1930,” database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online October 2016), Alexander Briles.

29. “Grandpa Briles Dead,” The Daily Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 15 January 1900, page 3; digital iamge, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 3 September 2020).

30. “Alexander Briles,” Burlington Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 19 January 1900, page 5; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 3 September 2020).

31. “Alexander Briles,” LeRoy Reporter (LeRoy, Kansas), 19 January 1900, page 3; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 3 September 2020).

32. Gibbon Joseph, page 51, 14 January 1900; Alexander Briles, Funeral Records – Gibbons Mortuary (Coffey County, Kansas), Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas.

Divorced

Have you encountered a hint on a census record that you’ve yet to prove? That’s my situation with the 1880 census record for Alexander Briles.

Alex Briles was listed as a head of household on the 1880 census in Coffey county, Kansas. According to the census, Alex was a 60 year old divorced male farmer who was born in North Carolina. Alex’s household included his granddaughter, Anna Ruggles, a 13 year old female and his son, Benjamin Briles, aged 26.

1860 U.S. Census, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 68 Image 4 of 9, household 513, Alexander Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017); NARA microfilm publication M653

Since Alexander’s first wife, Sarah died in 1872, the census record hints at a second marriage and subsequent divorce. While I haven’t located an image of a marriage record for Alexander, I did find an index record. According to that index, Alexander Briles married Elizabeth Eltzworth (Ellsworth) on May 30, 1875 in Coffey County, Kansas.

Kansas Marriages, 1840-1935 index (http://familysearch.org: FamilySearch), Alexander Briles – Elizabeth Eltzworth

Unfortunately, these records have not been digitized. Thus, I have yet to obtain a copy of the license. However, a deed supports the marriage of Alexander and Elizabeth. On 1 Jan 1877, Alexander Briles and Elizabeth M. Briles, his wife, sold land to Alexander’s son, Robert A. Briles.

This indenture, made this thirty first day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy seven between Alexander Briles and Elizabeth M Briles his wife of the county of Coffey and state of Kansas of the first part, and Robert A Briles of same place of the second part, witnesseth that the parties of the first part, in consideration of the sum of two hundred (200) dollars to them duly paid, have bargained and sole, and by these presents do grant and convey to the said party of the second part his heirs and assigns, all that land or parcel of land situated in Coffey County and State of Kansas and described as follows, to wit:
The South East quarter of the North East Quarter of section twelve (12) in Township twenty three (23) of range fifteen (15) containing 40 acres more or less.
With the appurtenances, and all the estate, title and interest, of the said parties of the first part therein. And the said Alexander Briles does hereby covenant and agree, that at the delivery hereof he is the lawful owner of the premises above granted, and seized of a good and indefensible estate of inheritance therein, in fee simple, and that the same are free and clear of all encumbrances, and that he will warrant defend the same in the quiet and peaceable possession of said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns forever, against the lawful claims of all persons whomsoever.
In witness whereof the said parties of the first part have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year above written.
Alexander Briles (seal)
Elizabet M Briles (seal)
State of Kansas
Coffey County
On this 31st day of January AD 1877 before me a notary public in and for said county, personally came Alexander Briles and Elizabeth M Briles his wife to me personally known to be the same person above named and affixed to the foregoing conveyance as grantors and they duly acknowledge the execution of the same.
In testimony, whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my official seal on the day and year last above written.
Wm H Bear
Notary Public
The testament, of which the foregoing is a true copy, was filed for record on the 31st day of January 1877, at 3 o’clock and 0 minutes p M.
Wm H Bear

Kansas, Coffey County. Deed Records, 1857-1903. Film #1510473 DGS 8561300. Alexander Briles to Robert Briles, 31 January 1877 Vo. 17: page 542; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 3 August 2022.

Since the 1880 census record indicates that Alexander Briles was divorced, that divorce had to have taken place sometime between the time Alexander and Elizabeth, his wife, sold land to Robert and June of 1880. A clue to that divorce may be in another deed. In this case, Alexander Briles sold 30 acres of land to Elizabeth M. Briles. Unlike the earlier deed, Elizabeth M. Briles is not referred to as Alexander’s wife.

Page 330 – image 271
This Indenture, made this 2nd day of December in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy nine, between Alexander Briles
of the County of Coffey
and state of Kansas of the first part, and Elizabeth M. Briles
of the same place
of the second part: Witnesseth, that the party of the first part, in consideration of the sum of
Two Hundred dollars
to him duly paid has bargained and sold, and by these presents do grant and convey to the said
party of the second part his heirs and assigns, all that tract or parcel of land, situated in Coffey
County, and State of Kansas and described as follows, to wit:
Commencing at the south east corner of the north
east quarter of the north east quarter of section
seven in township twenty three of range sixteen
thence west to 4 rods East of the center of said quarter
section (being the southwest corner of said NE quarter
of NE quarter section) thence north to the middle or
channel of Turkey Creek, thence down the channel
of said creek to the point where the same crosses the north
line of said section, thence East to the point where said
north line of section intersects the channel of said Tur-
key creek, thence down the channel of said creek to
point where the same crosses the East line of said section
thence south to place of beginning containing 30 acres
more or less
with the appurtenances, and all the estate, title and interest of said part of the first part therein And
the said Alexander Briles
do hereby covenant and agree, that at the delivery hereof, he is the lawful owner of the premises
above granted, and seized of a good and indefeasible estate of inheritance therein in fee simple, and that the
same are free and clear of all incumbrances,, and that he will warrant and defend the same in the
quiet and peaceable possession of said party of the second part, her heirs and assigns forever, against
the lawful claims of all persons whomsoever.
In witness whereof, the said party of the first part has hereunto set hand and seal
the day and year above written.
Alexander Briles

State of Kansas, Coffey County
On this 2nd day of December A.D. 1879, before me, a
Notary Public in and for said County, personally came
Alexander Briles
to me personally known to be the same person whose name is affixed
to the foregoing conveyance as grantor and he duly acknowledged the execution of the same.
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my
seal, on the day and year last above written.
S. C. Junkins
Notary Public
The instrument of which the foregoing is a true copy, was filed for record on the 3rd
day of December 1879, at 5 ou8217’clock and 0 minutes P.M.
Wm H. Bear Register of Deeds
By M. L. B. Floyd Deputy
Entered in Transfer record in my office on this 3rd day of Dec. A.D. 1879
Wm. H. Throckmorton County Clerk

Kansas, Coffey County. Deed Records, 1857-1903. Film #1510476 DGS 8561303. Alexander Briles, 2 Dec 1879 Vol. 25: page 330; digitized images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 5 August 2022.

Based on this 1879 deed, I think Alexander and Elizabeth were likely divorced around the time the 30 acres of land was sold to Elizabeth. However, I will need to locate a record of the divorce to confirm that suspicion.