My Germanna Connection

Well, it’s Saturday afternoon and I’m working on my genealogy while watching the K-State (Kansas State University) football game on TV. As the wildcats were winning their game, I decided to check out Randy Seaver’s Genea-Musings blog to see what the ‘Saturday Night Genealogy Fun’ blogging challenge is for this week.

It’s Saturday Night again –Time for some more Genealogy Fun!!


Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music):
1) Many of our ancestors migrated to a distant place.  Which one of your ancestors migrated the furthest?  Or the furthest in North America?  It could be in one big move, or in several smaller moves over their lifetime.  How far did they travel?  Do you know the route they took?

Thinking about these questions and my tree, I don’t have ancestors that traveled long distances across the United States. Since all of my second great grandparents settled in Kansas, my ancestors didn’t even migrate clear across the country.

Pedigree chart created in RootsMagic 8 (Preview) with color coding enabled

Thus, I have to turn to my immigrant ancestors to find the one who traveled the farthest. And I have to admit that I haven’t done much research of my immigrant ancestors. My tree can be divided into those ancestors who are included in published genealogies and those who are proving to be difficult to research in the pre-1850 records.

Since many of my lines came from England or Scotland, their distance of travel is similar. The branch of my tree that I think may have migrated the furthest is also one with a very interesting travel story: my Briles (Broils, Broyles, Breuel) line.

My ancestor, Johannes Breuel, his wife, Urusla Ruop, and children Jacob, Conrad and Elisabetha have all been identified as members of the Second Germanna Colony. Compared to other immigrant ancestors in my tree, their story is unique.

The We Relate web site includes the following information about the Second Germanna colony.

Second Germanna: Later, in 1717, a shipful of German immigrants bound for Pennsylvania, landed in Virginia with approximately 70 persons, and this second group of settlers (called “The Second Germanna Colony” or “New German Town”) arrived in Germanna (about 2 miles away from the First Colony at the fork of the Rapidan and Rappahannock Rivers, i.e. – “The Great Fork”) in the beginning of 1718. Whether their ship landed in Virginia due to weather (the Captain’s claim) or due to collusion (between Spotswood, his associates and the Captain) is not clear. This second group, was put to work by Spotswood in “naval stores” and were not involved in the iron mines. They were placed on 13,000 acres of land which Lt. Gov. Spotswood and Robert Beverley (and other partners), who needed settlers to move onto the land to lay claim to it. Since their transportation was paid for by these partners, they became indentured servants and were bound to locate to that area. This group of German immigrants, who originated from the Baden, Württemberg, Heidelberg and Neckar regions of Germany and Switzerland, was Lutheran by religion.

https://www.werelate.org/wiki/Germanna_Colony

The ‘Second Germanna Colony‘ page on the Alexander Spotswood website tells a slightly different version of their story.

The Germanna Second Colony, unlike the Germanna First Colony, did not come to Virginia of their own free will.  Their ship’s captain, Andrew Tarbett, had  promised to take them to Pennsylvania – where we believe their friends and families were headed — on his ship Scott.  But Tarbett had gambled away their passage money in London.  He knew that the Lieutenant Governor Alexander Spotswood in Virginia would pay the costs of their journey if the Germans were delivered to Virginia, as Spotswood was willing to pay to increase the supply of hard workers in his colony.  Captain Tarbett pretended that the Scott was blown off course and “accidentally” arrived in Virginia where he delivered his passengers to Spotswood.

http://alexanderspotswood.com/second_germanna_colony.html

The Germanna Second Colony‘s version of their story is similar to that posted on the Alexander Spotswood site:

The Second Colony, in contrast, came from the Palatinate and the Kraichgau area of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Its members did not come voluntarily to Virginia. These families expected to go to Pennsylvania with other Germans, but their ship’s captain, Andrew Tarbett, had been incarcerated in London for debt, and their money was used up while they waited. Tarbett must have known that Governor Spotswood was willing to pay the passage for another group of Germans, for when he got out of debtor’s prison, he transported these Germans on his ship, the Scott, to Virginia, pretending to be blown off course in a storm. There, lost and penniless, they became indentured servants to Spotswood.

http://secondcolony.org/thestory.html

According to the list of second colony members on the Germanna website, Johannes Breuel came from the area of Otisheim, Wurttemberg, Germany. According to Google Maps, Otisheim is almost straight north of Zurich Switzerland and northwest of Stuttgart, Germany.

The Breuel family likely migrated up the Rhine River. If so, they left Europe at Rotterdam to arrive in London before boarding the ship for the Americas.

Thus, my line that likely migrated the furthest also has one of the most interesting migration stories.

Thresher

As you go thru your old photos, do you ever find some that need more of a story to go with them? That’s my case with photos my grandmother handed down of my grandfather’s threshing machine. Unfortunately, my grandfather didn’t live to tell me stories of his very interesting life and I didn’t get many details about the thresher from my grandmother.

Based on the photos, my grandfather operated two different threshers. One was horse driven and the other was steam driven.

Edward Osmund Briles’ horse drawn thresher
Edward Briles’ steam engine thresher and automobile
Edward Briles and wife Pauline on steam engine thresher

To try and learn more about my grandfather and his threshers, I turned to Kansas newspapers. Since my grandfather lived near Crandall and Vernon, Kansas at the time, I searched both Coffey county and Woodson county newspapers.

The article, “Little Threshers Doing the Business” in the 10 Jul 1919 issue of The Daily Republican from Burlington Kansas helps date the transition from horse drawn to steam driven threshers.

Little Threshers Doing the Business

The small threshing machines which were sold this summer to groups of farmers around Burlington are proving successful. These threshers are pulled by tractor engines which any of the farmers own and use for other purposes. Many of the tractors were sold along with the threshers.

Some doubt has been expressed as to whether or not the small machines would handle the heavy straw this summer and also whether or not there would be enough power in some of the smaller tractor engines to pull the machines when handling the long straw but Mr. Sherwood, manager of the Burlington Hardware Co., which concern has sold about 40 of the machines stated this morning that the machines were working in full force threshing from 500 to 500 bushels a day depending on their size and that no difficulty has been experienced by the heavy straw. in most instances the small threshers were bought by groups of 4 or 5 farmers who have wheat land in the same neighborhood. One of the machines is now in operation at the Mike Russell farm, one at Robert King’s, one at L. K. Prokop and one on the John Kennedy farm. All are doing first class work. Other machines are scattered over the county. Mr. Sherwood predicts that eventually a large part of the wheat will be threshed by smaller community owned machines.

Details about my grandfather’s threshing machine are sketchy, but local news items do indicate that he ran a threshing machine.

There are two threshing machines in this neighborhood. Osmond Briles is threshing for Mrs. L. E. Crandall and Ira Edwards for Jess Lippe.

“Crandall,” LeRoy Reporter (LeRoy, Kansas), 19 Sep 1919, page 8, digital images available on Newspapers.com

The 6 Jul 1923 issue of The Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas) indicates that Osmond and his brother Glenn Briles were threshing in the Vernon area.

Vernon News

Osmond and Glenn Briles expect to begin threshing sometime this week.

“Vernon News,” The Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas), 6 Jul 1928, page 8 available on Newspapers.com.

The role of the women in the family during threshing season are mentioned in the 3 Aug 1923 issue of The Yates Center News.

Vernon Items

Orean Briles helped Mrs. Glenn Briles cook for threshers one day last week.

Mrs. Jud Cope and Mrs. Earl Smith helped Mrs. E. G. Briles cook for threshers Friday and Saturday.

“Vernon Items,” The Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Aug 1923, page 8 available on Newspapers.com

Another mention was found in the 15 Jan 1925 issue of The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas).

Vernon Gossip

Osmond Briles is threshing in our neighborhood this week.

“Vernon Gossip,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas) 15 Jan 1925, page 1 available on Newspapers.com

An article in the 18 Jul 1929 issue of The Neosho Falls Post indicates that Osmond Briles owned two threshing machines.

Working Hard to Save the Wheat Crop

Osmond Briles has had both of his threshing machines running almost continually to save the wheat crop in the bottom farms. He reported Wednesday morning that almost all of the wheat on the south side of the river had been threshed. In many instances it was necessary to pull the machine thru water several feet deep to get to the fields. Altho no rain has fallen here for over a week the river has continued to rise slowly.

“Working Hard to Save the Wheat Crop,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 18 Jul 1919, page 3 available on Newspapers.com

The last mention I could find of Osmond Briles’ threshing career was in the 3 Jul 1930 issue of The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas).

Philmore Items

Osmond Briles threshed wheat for C. R. Grant on the E. B. Moore farm Saturday. We were informed that the wheat yielded well and was a good quality.

“Philmore Items,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 3 Jul 1930, page 4 available on Newspapers.com.

These newspaper articles provide another glimpse into the business life of my grandfather, Edward Osmond Briles.

Front Page News

#SaturdayNightGenealogyFun

This week’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun writing prompt is to find the front page headlines for one’s birthdate from a local newspaper.

Instead of doing this for myself, I am going to do it for my grandparents since their birthdates are public information.

As I am working on this project, I am very thankful for my Kansas roots. From its early history, the Kansas Historical Society has preserved many of the local newspapers. Many of those same newspapers have been digitized by the historical society or local library.

Thus, locating this information is relatively easy. For this project, I’m using Newspapers.com. Since I’m working with my grandparents, I’m looking for the following:

  • 6 Feb 1894 in Newton where my grandfather was born or Dodge City where the family lived most of his life (Harvey and Ford Counties)
  • 30 Jun 1903 in Lansing or Leavenworth (Leavenworth County)
  • 21 Jun 1891 in Burington or LeRoy (Coffey County)
  • 28 Mar 1896 in Yates Center or Neosho Falls (Woodson County)

Instead of searching Newspapers.com, I’m gong to use the ‘Papers’ menu to search for newspapers printed on the date in my desired location. Thus, I’m going to put the town in the ‘Narrow by Newspaper Title’ search box and the date in the ‘Enter a Date or Range’ search box. When I click on the UPDATE button, Newspapers.com shows the papers available for that location with a date range that includes my desired date.

Since I have used these papers in the past, I know that there are also papers with the county name and not the city name. Thus, I can repeat the search for the county.

I opened each of the potential papers in a new tab. Even though I entered the exact date, the search only used the year. Thus, it is possible to have a newspaper in the results that does include newspapers published in the year – but not in the month I need.

Paper begins August 1894 – thus it does not contain Feb 1894

Since many of these papers were weekly papers, I likely won’t find a local paper for the exact day my grandparent was born.

Weekly Paper

Thus, I’m going to work with the first paper found in the family’s community that was printed after the birth of my grandparent.

Leon Crawford – 6 Feb 1894

  • “Closing Out Sale at the New York Store” 1/4 page ad at top of first page with W. J. Fitzgerald identified as the receiver. The name of the store is NOT given, nor is any address included in the ad. Dodge City Democrat, February 10, 1894
  • “Washington Gossip” Dodge City Democrat, February 10, 1894
  • “They Want Revenge” Dodge City Democrat, February 10, 1894
  • “Real Estate Moving: Houston, Texas, Rapidly Coming tot he Front – The Real estate Market Active,” The Newton Semi-Weekly Journal (Newton, Kansas), 9 Feb 1894
  • “Elections Law: The Senate Passes the House Bill Unchanged,” The Newton Semi-Weekly Journal (Newton, Kansas), 9 Feb 1894
  • “Snider Acts: Threatens Orrin T. Welch with Imprisonment” The Newton Semi-Weekly Journal (Newton, Kansas), 9 Feb 1894.
  • “Bland’s Bill: It Is Taken Up by the House after Much Difficulty,” Newton Daily Republican (Newton, Kansas), 9 Feb 1894.
  • “U. P. Employes: Judge Riner of the United States Court Offers a Suggestion,” Newton Daily Republican (Newton, Kansas), 9 Feb. 1894.
  • “A Diabolical Deed: Bandits Wreck a Train Near Houston,” Newton Daily Republican (Newton, Kansas), 9 Feb 1894.
  • “Chicago’s Fish Supply,” Newton Daily Republican (Newton, Kansas), 9 Feb 1894.

Winnie Currey – 30 Jun 1903

  • “Additional Locals,” The Lansing News (Lansing, Kansas), 3 Jul 1903.
  • “King-Campbell Wedding,” The Lansing News (Lansing, Kansas) 3 Jul 1903.
  • “Prison News,” The Lansing News (Lansing, Kansas), 3 Jul 1903.
  • “Iowa Republican Convention Opens,” The Evening Standard (Leavenworth, Kansas), 1 Jul 1903.
  • “Hans’ Wyrick Badly Injured,” The Evening Standard (Leavenworth, Kansas), 1 Jul 1903.
  • “Julius Sawacski Is Dismissed by Court: The Wrong Allegation Had Been Made,” The Evening Standard (Leavenworth, Kansas), 1 Jul 1903.
  • “N’Nutt and Meeker Trials Tomorrow,” The Evening Standard (Leavenworth, Kansas), 1 Jul 1903.
  • “Last of the Dewey Testimony Yesterday,” The Leavenworth Times (Leavenworth, Kansas), 1 Jul 1903.
  • Eddie Hanlon and Benny Yanger Draw: Was a Fierce Fight from the Start,” The Leavenworth Times (Leavenworth, Kansas), 1 Jul 1903.
  • “Many Miners Buried in a Mine Explosion: Over Two Hundred Lives Were Lost,” The Leavenworth Times (Leavenworth, Kansas), 1 Jul 1903.

Edward Osmond Briles – 21 Jun 1891

  • “Stop and Read: What the New Store Has to Say,” (1/4 page ad) The Courier (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “Over the County: A Large Grist of News from our Rustling Correspondents,” The Courier (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “News of the Week: Gleaned by Telegraph and Mail,” Burlington Independent (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “Kansas State News,” Burlington Independent (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “The War in Chili,” Burlington Independent (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “McDonald Dead,” Burlington Independent (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “Spring Weather Calls for Spring Footwear: Chas, Kahnt & Co., (advertisement),” Burlington Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891
  • Buy Grain: Woodford Brothers, (advertisement),” Burlington Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “To Young Men: Able Appeal to Young Men by Rev. T. DeWitt Talmage,” Burlington Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “Shot Down: Col. S. N. wood Killed in a Court Room,” Burlington Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “McDonald Dead,” Burlington Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “Furious Storms: Damage Caused by Storms in Various Parts of the County,” Burlington Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “Kansas State News,” Burlington Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “News of the Week: Gleaned by Telegraph and Mail,” Le Roy Reporter (Le Roy, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “Kansas State News,” Le Roy Reporter (Le Roy, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “The War in Chili,” Le Roy Reporter (Le Roy, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “McDonald Dead,” Le Roy Reporter (Le Roy, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “Silver Advocates,” Le Roy Reporter (Le Roy, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.
  • “A Young Deluge,” Le Roy Reporter (Le Roy, Kansas), 26 Jun 1891.

Pauline Mentzer – 28 Mar 1896

  • “Notice: About two more weeks remains to close out my stock (large ad by Sam Bukofzer),” Woodson County Advocate (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Spring Arrivals: Stockebrand & Stockebrand (large ad),” Woodson County Advocate (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Subsoiling in Greenwood County,” Woodson County Advocate (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Botkin’s Case,” Woodson County Advocate (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “One Farmer’s Pluck,” Woodson County Advocate (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Sunday School Convention,” Woodson County Advocate (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • 1/2 page of advertising, Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Editorial Notes,” Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “A Mortgage Ruling,” Yates Center News (Yates Center, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Heart of the World, by H. Rider Haggard,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Annual Assignments: Southwest Kansas M. E. Conference Stations the Preachers for Next Year,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Our Currency: Secretary Smith and ex-speaker Crips Meet in Debate,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Congress,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.
  • “Mail Subsidies: A Sharp Debate Occurs Over Extending System,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 3 Arp 1896.
  • “Kansas State News,” The Neosho Falls Post (Neosho Falls, Kansas), 3 Apr 1896.

Even with this abundance of local newspapers, a search of Newspapers.com for birth announcements only turns up one such announcement.

Born

To Mr. and Mrs. J. Crawford of Allison street, a son.

“Born,” Newton Daily Republican (Newton, Kansas) 9 Feb 1894

Even though looking at the front pages of these papers was informative, I prefer to search the wealth of family information that can be found in these local papers.

Throwback Thursday

While searching for a birth announcement in the Iola, Kansas newspapers, I came across this interesting little article.

My aunt and uncle owned an airplane!

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Mentzer and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Mentzer enjoyed a visit and plane ride Friday when Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Thompson flew their plane down from Emporia. While here they got a birdeye view of Woodson and Allen County. Mrs. Thompson is the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Briles of Emporia, who lived here many years ago.

“Local News,” 18 Nov 1954, The Iola Register (Iola, Kansas), page 8, Marvin Thompson; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 10 June 2021).

Place Line

#SaturdayNightGenealogyFun

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:  It’s Saturday Night again – 
Time for some more Genealogy Fun!!


Here is your assignment, should you decide to accept it (you ARE reading this, so I assume that you really want to play along – cue the Mission Impossible music!):
1)  We’re all familiar with Timelines – date, location, event, etc. – for events in our lives.  This week, create a Place Line for your life, or for the life of one of your parents or grandparents – your choice! In that Place Line, tell us the location (address if possible), inclusive dates (if possible), and events. Consider topics like residence, schools, churches, employment, etc.

To protect the privacy of my immediate family, I am choosing to do a place line for Pauline Briles. To determine these places, I have used land records, census records, city directories and newspaper articles. Since Pauline lived her entire life in Kansas, I can take advantage of Ancestry’s source, Kansas, City and County Census Records, 1919-1961, to help fill in the blanks.

Pauline Edith Mentzer, wife of Edward Osmund Briles

  • 1896 – born in Woodson County, Kansas – likely North Township
  • 1900 – census records indicate she was living in North township, Woodson County, Kansas
  • 1905 – Kansas census records indicate she was living in Neosho Falls, Woodson County, Kansas
  • 1910 – census records indicate she was living in Liberty Township, Coffey County, Kansas
  • 1913 – received a diploma from School District #9 in Coffey County, Kansas implying she was living in Coffey County
  • 1914 – attended high school in Yates Center, Kansas
  • 1915 – married Edward Osmund Briles in Yates Center, Kansas
  • 1917 – husband’s draft record indicates they were living in Vernon, (Woodson County), Kansas
  • 1920 – living in Iola, Kansas
  • 1925 – living in Iola, Kansas
  • 1929 – moved out of house on South Pecan street in Iola, (Allen County) Kansas
  • 1930 – living in Buffalo, Wilson County, Kansas
  • 1934 – living in Emporia Kansas
  • 1937 – 416 Constitution, Emporia, Kansas
  • 1939 – 6 Mechanic St., Emporia, Kansas
  • 1940 – 613 Lincoln Street
  • 1942 – RFD #1 (likely East 6th Street), Emporia, Kansas
  • 1945 – 924 Constitution, Emporia, Kansas
  • 1952 – 645 Lincoln, Emporia, Kansas
  • 1953 – city directory indicates she was living at 924 Constitution, Emporia, Kansas while the census lists and address of 645 Lincoln, Emporia, Kansas
  • 1955 – 645 Lincoln, Emporia, Kansas
  • 1956 – her husband died; his death certificate indicates they were living at 645 Lincoln, Emporia, Kansas
  • 1957 – 138 W. 12th
  • 1958 – Manhattan, Kansas living with daughter
  • 1959 – lived at 1014 Market Street, Emporia, Kansas which is where her sister, Gladys Green lived
  • 1961 – 821 W. 6th St., Emporia, Kansas – lived here until the house was sold for development along 6th street
  • 1967 – 609 W 5th St., Emporia, Kansas
  • 1976 – 609 W. 5th St., Emporia, Kansas
  • 1977 – 609 W. 5th St., Emporia, Kansas; lived here until she moved to Horizon Plaza
  • 1984 – at her death she was living in apartment #405 at Horizon Plaza at 1531 Wheeler in Emporia, Kansas

Below are two pictures of Pauline standing in front of her home at the time. Unfortunately, I don’t know which house is pictured in these photos.

My Germanna Connection

Do you have a surname that has changed over time in your family tree? I’m sure that I have several, but the one that sometimes confuses people is my Briles line. It is this line that connects me to the Second Germanna Colony in Virginia. My ancestor Conrad Briles (Broil, Broils) was the son of John Broyles (Johann Breuel). The booklet, Before Germana: The Ancestry of the Broyles, Paulitz Moyer and Motz Families outlines the various surname spellings.

The Broyles surname is spelled differently in American and German records. It is most consistently spelled Breyhel and Breuel in German parish registers. Its variations in American records include Broil, Boil, Briles and Bryol, to list a few.

Before Germana: The Ancestry of the Broyles … Families

The immigrant, John Broyles, had six children: Hans Jacob, Mattheus, Conrad, Jerg Martin, Maria Elisabetha and Catherine. It is Conrad’s line that takes on the BRILES spelling of the surname after Conrad moves to Randolph County, North Carolina. The entry for Conrad in the Keith Transcript discusses this spelling transition.

3. Conrad Broyles (son of John Broyles, 1) was born in Germany and brought to this country in 1717. He was still under age in 1727. He died in Randolph Co., North Carolina, in the latter part of 1784. In the Virginia records his name is spelled Broil or Broyl. In his will his name is once given as Broil but is signed as Briles. His children are also called Brile. In later years his descendants have generally used the spelling Briles.

Keith, Arthur Leslie. The Broyles Family. Volume I, page 13.

So starting with my grandfather, Edward Osmund Briles, my lineage back to the Germanna colonies is as follows:

(1) Edward Osmond Briles (1891-1956) married Pauline Edith Mentzer in 1915.

(2) Edward Grant Briles (1869-1951) married Frances Artlissa Ricketts in 1890.

(4) Noah Washington Briles (1840-1879) married Sarah Jane Thompson in 1866.

(8) Alexander Briles (1817-1900) married Sarah Rush in 1836. Alexander left North Carolina about 1858 to settle in what would become Coffey County, Kansas.

(16) John Briles (1775-1855) married Nancy Ann Beckerdite

(32) Frederick Briles (abt 1744-1815). According to the FamilySearch tree, his wife was Mary Goodrich, but I haven’t verified this information.

(64) Conrad Broyles (Broil, Brile) (1709-1784). According to the FamilySearch tree, Conrad married Margaret Rausch in 1730 in Madison County, Virginia. I do not have a source for this marriage at this time.

(128) John Broyles (Johannes Breuel) (1670 – abt 1734) married Ursula Ruop in 1703 in Wuerttemberg, Germany. John, Ursula and their children were part of the second colony of Germanna.

Even though the spelling of the surname changed, there appears to be a pattern to the change. My research suggests that the BRILES surname traces back to Randolph County, North Carolina, while the BROYLES surname is found in Tennessee and traces back to Virginia. Both lines descend from our immigrant ancestor, John Broyles (Johannes Breuel).

Additional information about my BRILES ancestors can be found on my Ancestry tree, starting with Edward Osmund Briles. The top menu of this blog also has a page with links to my other ‘online trees‘.

Mom

#SaturdayNightGenealogyFun

Here is your assignment, should you decide to accept it (you ARE reading this, so I assume that you really want to play along – cue the Mission Impossible music!):

1)  Sunday is Mother’s Day in the USA, and usually a time for memories and gratitude to our special birth person.

2)  For this week’s SNGF, tell us some things about your mother that are special and memorable  to you.

This post is a hard one, particularly since I’ve never thought about this before. However, looking back I can describe some special memories.

One of those special memories is of mom playing the piano. She didn’t play often, likely because she didn’t have time to sit down at the piano. Mom had the ability to play the melody with the right hand and just play chords with her right hand. Thus, she could pick up a piece of music and play it beautifully. Christmastime usually included some evening where mom would sit down and play various hymns and carols.

Christmas brings another special ‘mom’ memory. For many years, mom would spend evenings in December making candy. I remember her making fudge, divinity, nougat, peanut brittle, pralines, stuffed dates and caramel pecan roll. This candy was then packaged as gifts. Some would be sent to the homes of her siblings while other packages were shared with neighbors and likely co-workers.

Another special memory is how mom and dad opened their home to my cousin. My cousin’s father was working in Nigeria. While the family had been living in Nigeria, my cousin had reached the age where she had to either go to a boarding school or return to the United States to attend school. My cousin lived with us for a couple of years. My parents weathered the storms of two teenage girls used to being the only girl now thrown into having to share their ‘space’. Even after my cousin’s family was reunited when her parents moved back to Kansas, mom and dad stayed close to her, celebrating her life achievements.

Besides helping me learn to cook, mom was insistent that I acquire two other skills: Typing and sewing. Even though I had taken typing as a 9th grader, mom felt like I needed to improve my skills. Thus, I took a typing class during the summer while in high school. Like the typing issue, mom wanted me to improve my sewing schools. Thus, we took an evening class in tailoring together. Although I don’t sew my own clothes any more, I still use those typing skills — every day!

So how about you? What are some of your ‘mom’ memories?

Sarah Jane Thompson

Sarah Jane Thompson was born on 7 Aug 1843 in Warrick, Indiana, United States.19

She moved to Iowa with her parents in 1847.9

In 1850, Sarah Thompson was listed as a 6 year old female who was born in Indiana and was living in the household of William Thompson in Wapello County, Iowa.10

She lived in Richland Township, Wapello, Iowa, United States in 1856.11

Sarah J. Thompson was listed as a 16 year old female who was  born in Indiana living in the household of William T Thompson in Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa in 1860.12

She married Noah Washington Briles on 9 Aug 1866 in Ottumwa, Wapello, Iowa, United States.5,9,1322

Sarah lived in Crandall, Coffey, Kansas, United States in 1867.9

On 19 Mar 1868, Ida Angelina Briles was born in Wapello, Iowa, United States.9

On 18 Jul 1869, Edward Grant Briles was born in Coffey, Kansas, United States.9,23

In 1870, Sarah Briles was listed as a 26 year old female born in Indiana in the household of Noah Brile living in Coffey County, Kansas.24

In 1875, S. J. Briles is listed as a 31 year old female who was born in Indiana in the household of N. W. Briles living in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas.25

Sarah Briles’ husband, Noah Briles, died on 14 Jul 1879 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.26

In 1880, Sarah Briles was listed as a 36 year old female head of household living in Neosho township, Coffey County, Kansas. Also living in the household are a 12 year old daugheter, Ida A.and a 10 year old son, Edward G.27

In 1885, Sarah Briles was listed on the census as a 41 year old female with 120 acres who was born in Indiana. Also living in the household was 15 year old Edgar Briles28

Sarah J. Briles applied for a pension based on the civil war service of Noah Brileson 22 Oct 1885. Noah W. Briles served in the Iowa Cavalry.29

She mortgaged the W 1/2 NE 1/4 Section 12 Township 23 Range 15 for $150 to W. H. Fear on 13 Nov 1886 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.30

She married J. D. Davis on 10 May 1888 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.7,3136

She had paid off 1886 mortage to W. H. Fear of the W 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of Section12, township 23, range 15 on 19 Dec 1888 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.30

Sarah and J.D. Davis, her husband and E. G. Briles, a single man, mortgaged the W 1/2 NE 1/4 Section 12 Township 23 Range 15 for $165 to Angeline Myers on 2 Dec 1889 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.37

In 1895, S. J. Davis was listed as a 51 year old female who was born in Indiana on the census. She was living  in the household of J. D. Davis in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas.38

She mortgaged the West half of the northeast quarter of Section in 12 Township and  23 Range 15 for $800 to E G Briles on 15 Jul 1896 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.39

She  purchased land being the West half of the northeast quarter of Section 12 of Township 23 Range and the southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of section thirty six in township twenty two of range fifteen 15 for $1000 from Jeremiah D Davis on 20 Jul 1898 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.40

Sarah J. Davis and J. D. Davis were divorced on 8 Sep 1898 in Coffey, Kanss.41

Sarah J Briles was listed as the head of household on the 1900 census. According to the census, Sarah was born Aug 1844 in Indiana. Sarah was a widow. According to the census, Sarah was not the mother of any children.42

Sarah mortgaged the West half of the northeast quarter of  Section 12 in Township 23 Range 15 for $350 to R Waldron on 15 Jul 1901 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.43

She entertained Rev. Smith and family in May 1903 in Rock Creek Township, Carroll, Indiana, United States.44

Sarah was listed as a 60 year old head of household on the 1905 census living in Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas.45

She sold land being the West 1/2 Section 12 in Township 23 of Range 15 for $800 to H. E. Myers on 15 Mar 1910 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.46

Sarah J Briles was listed as the mother in law of Harry E Myers on the 1910 census. According to the census, Sarah was a 67 year old widow who was born in Indiana. Sarah was the mother of 2 living children.47

In 1915, S. J. Briles was listed as a 70 year old female born in Iowa in the household of H. E. Myers in Coffey County, Kansas.48

On 7 Oct 1916, Sarah registered for a pension as a the remarried widow of Noah W Briles who served in the 1st Iowa Cavalry .49

On 10 Apr 1917, she received pension based on her husband, Noah Briles, service during the civil war .50

Sarah J. Briles was listed as a head of household on the 1920 census. According to the census, Sarah was a 76 year old widow who was born in Indiana.51

She spent day with granddaughter, Mrs. Bethel Allen and fmaily in Jan 1922 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.52

 Sarah Briles was listed in the household of Angine Myers on the 1925 Kansas census. According to the census, Sarah was an 81 year old widow who was born in Indiana.4,53

Sarah J Briles was listed as the mother in law of Ed C Barr on the 1930 census. According to the census, Sarah was an 86 year old widow who was born in Indiana.54

Sarah died on 17 Aug 1930 at the age of 87 in Neosho Township, Coffey, Kansas, United States.23,89,5556

She was buried on 19 Aug 1930 at Big Creek Cemetery in Coffey, Kansas, United States.3,89,57

ENDNOTES:

    1. Edmund West, comp., “Family Data Collection — Individual Records,” database online, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017), Sarah Jane Thompson.

        2. Edmund West, comp., “Family Data Collection — Individual Records,” database online Sarah Jane Thompson.

        3. Ancestry Database, U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012).

        4. Ancestry.com, Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009), Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, Kansas; 1925 Kansas Territory Census; Roll: KS1925_26; Line: 11.

        5. Yates Publishing, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004), Source number: 167.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: MP1.

        6. , Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925, Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, Kansas; 1875 Kansas Territory Census; Roll: ks1875_4; Line: 16.

        7. Publishing, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Source number: 205.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: MP1.

        8. BillionGraves, digital images of tombstone, BillionGraves (billiongraves.com : viewed online 13 March 2021), memorial for Noah W Briles (1840-1877), BillionGraves created by mcphilbrick, citing Big Creek Cemetery, Coffey County, Kansas; accompanying photograph by donw1948@yahoo.com, Noah W Briles.

        9. “Sarah J. Briles Dead”, Leroy Reporter, (Leroy, Kansas), 29 August 1930, page 1, microfilm; Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas.

        10. 1850 U.S. Census, Wapello County, Iowa, population schedule, District 13, Wapello County, IOwa, page 89 (image 103 of 204), household 695, William T Thompson; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online June 2017).

        11. 1856 Iowa Census, Wapello County, Iowa, Iowa state census, Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa, page 391 Image 24 of 24, household 166, William T Thompson; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online (image very faint) June 2017); State Historical Society of Iowa

        12. 1860 U.S. Census, Wapello County Iowa, population schedule, Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa, page 54, family 578, William T Thompson; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 14 March 2021); NARA microfilm publication M653.

        13. Briles Genealogy (Crandall, Kansas: Max Briles, aft 1952), p. 5

        14. “Iowa, Select Marriages Index, 1758-1996,”Ancestry.com,  (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/60284/ : Wapello County Iowa, viewed online (March 2017), Noah W. Briles – Sarah J Thompson; Family Search.

        15. Iowa Marriages, 1809-1992, Noah W. Briles – Sarah J. Thompson, 9 August 1866; database, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : viwed online March 2017).

        16. U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, Sarah Briles, October 1885; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online July 2017).

        17. NSDAR, Wapello County Iowa Marriage Records 1846-1880 (Iowa: NSDAR, 1943). (N.p.: n.p., n.d.), p. 31 (Thompson.IA.012).

        18. , Iowa Marriages, 1809-1992, database, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : . (N.p.: n.p., n.d.), viwed online; March 2017; Noah W. Briles – Sarah J. Thompson; 9 Aug 1866.

        19. National Archives and Records Administration, U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000), viewed online; July 2017; Sarah Briles; Oct 1885.

        20. “Family Data Collection — Individual Records,”Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : viewed online (13 March 2021), Noah W. Briles.

        21. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 database, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7836/). Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 : viewed online 13 March 2021; Noah Washington Briles – Sarah Jane Thompson.

        22. Mrs. F. A. Gordon. Wapello County, Iowa Marriage Records 1846-1869.  Film #film #851207 DGS 8211139. Noah Briles, : p. 31; digital images, FamilySearch : viewed online 13 March 2021.film #851207 DGS 8211139

        23. “E. G. Briles”, Yates Center News, (Yates Center, Kansas), 2 August 1951, page 5, microfilm; Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS.

        24. 1870 U.S. Census, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 10 Image 9 of 16, household 60, Briles Noah; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T132

        25. 1875 Kansas State Census, Coffey County, Kansas, Kansas State Census, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 10-11 Image 6 of 13, household 81, N W Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); Kansas State Historical Society

        26. “Died,” Burlington Democrat (Burlington, Kansas), 18 July 1879, p. 3; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online July 2018).

        27. 1880 U.S. Census, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, ED 49, Page 8 Image 8 of 13, household 72, Sarah A Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T9

        28. 1885 Kansas Census, Neosho County, State Census, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kanss, page 28 Image 15 of 62, family 66, Sarah Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 14 March 2021); Kansas State Historical Society

        29. U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, Sarah J Briles, .

        30. Coffey County, Kansas, Deeds, Mortgage book 17 page 522, Sarah J Briles / W. H. Gear, 15 November 1886; Recorder of Deeds, Burlington, Kansas.

        31. Marriages, p. 32, 33 (Briles.KS.001).

        32. “The Burlington Independent”, (Burlington, Kansas), “Married” page 3 col. 3 18 May 1888 (Briles.KS.036);

        33. Coffey County, Kansas, Marriage Records, Vol. D:54, J. D. Davis-Sarah J. Briles, 10 May 1888; digital image, “Kansas County Marriages, 1840-1935,” FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org:  accessed 18 January 2017).

        34. , “The Burlington Independent”, (Burlington, Kansas), to (); , . Hereinafter cited as “The Burlington Independent”. (N.p.: n.p., n.d.), “Married” page 3 col. 3 18 May 1888 (Briles.KS.036).

        35. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 database, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7836/) : [AccessType] [AccessDate]; Sarah Jane Thompson – J D Davis.

        36. , Kansas, County Marriages, 1811-1911, database with images, Ancestry.com http://www.ancestry.com : . Original Source: Marriage Records. Kansas Marraiges. Family Search, Salt Lake City, UT. (N.p.: n.p., n.d.), Sarah J. Briles.

        37. Coffey County, Kansas, Deeds, Mortgage Book 23 page 484.

        38. 1895 Kansas Census, Coffey County, State Census, Neosho Township, page 16 Image 24 of 66, J. D. Davis; microfilm, Kansas State Historical Society (Topeka, KS : viewed online March 2016)

        39. Coffey County, Kansas, Deeds, Mortgage book 34 page 521.

        40. Coffey County, Kansas, Deeds, Book 51 page 383.

        41. Kansas, Coffey County. Divorce Packets, 1861-1917.  Film #Film 1508586 DGS #008215152. Jeremiah D. Davis vs. Sarah J. Davis, 1898 Packet Nos. 3574-4582 1895-1903: image 921; digital images, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online 11 March 2021.Film 1508586 DGS #008215152

        42. 1900 U.S. Census, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, ED 41, sheet 6B Image 12 of 16, fanukt 121, Sarah J Briles; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA T623

        43. Coffey County, Kansas, Deeds, Mortgage book 41 page 349.

        44. “Rock Creek,” Burlington Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 21 May 1902, page 6; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online July 2018).

        45. 1905 Kansas Census, Coffey County, Kansas, State Census, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 8 Image 16 of 72, line 15, Sarah Briles; digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 15 March 2021)

        46. Coffey County, Kansas, Deeds, Book 77 page 427.

        47. 1910 U.S. Census, Liberty Township, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, ED 17, Sheet 6B Image 12 of 16, household 94, Harry E Myers; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017)

        48. 1915 Kansas Census, Coffey County, State Census, Neosho Township, page 3 Image 5 of 58, household 22, H. E. Myers; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online March 2016)

        49. U.S., Civil War and Later Wars Index to Remarried Widow Pension Applications, 1848-1934, Sarah J Briles, 7 October 1916; database with images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online October 2018). Original Source: Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, 1773-2007.

        50. Pension File for Noah Washington Briles (: U.S. Government), , (Briles.Noah.Notebook).

        51. 1920 U.S. Census, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, ED 18, Sheet 6B Image 7 of 12, househld 72, Harry Myers; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA microfilm publication T625

        52. “Crandall,” The Daily Republican (Burlington, Kansas), 1 February 1922; Newspapers.com (http://www.newspaprs.com : online September 2015).

        53. 1925 Kansas Census, Coffey County, Kansas, Kansas State Census, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, page 13 Image 15 of 45, family 91, Angine Myers; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 14 March 21); Kansas State Historical Society

        54. 1930 U.S. Census, Coffey County, Kansas, population schedule, Neosho Township, Coffey County, Kansas, ED 10, Sheet 5B Image 10 of 11, household 120, Barr Ed C; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA T626

        55. Find a Grave, database and images, Find a Grave (www.findagrave.com : viewed online July 2017), memorial for Sarah J Briles (1843-1930), Find a Grave Memorial no. #30672553, created by Janis Humbert, citing Big Creek Cemetery, Burlington, Coffey County, Kansas; accompanying photograph by Janis Humbert, Sarah J Briles.

        56. “Family Data Collection — Individual Records,”Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : [OriginalSource], [OriginalCreator], [Location], [Book]; Birth year: 1843; Birth city: Warrick Co; Birth state: IN[AccessType] ([AccessDate]), [Entry].

        57. Find a Grave, database and images, Find a Grave (www.findagrave.com : viewed online September 2016), memorial for Sarah J. Briles (1843-1930), Find a Grave Memorial no. #30672553,