Conflicting Data

Do you ever encounter records that seem to be the same person but contain conflicting data? Well, that just happened to me when I found an obituary for Mrs. Carrie Woolford in the 16 July 1931 issue of the Journal Gazette of Maltoon, Illinois.

Death of Former Arcola resident
Special to the Journal-Gazette
Arcola, Ill., July 16. – Mrs. Carrie Woolford, widow of Jacob P. Woolford, and former Arcola resident, died Monday in San Antonio, Tex., at the home of a son, Samuel Woolford, with whom she had been making her home for about 13 years.
The body has been shipped to Arcola for burial here Friday.
Mrs. Woolford spent the early part of her life in Arcola and in the Galton neighborhood. She married Jacob Woolford, Dec. 24, 1879, three sons being born to the union, all of whom are living. They are Ross Woolford of Rupert, Ida., Alfred Woolford, Terre Haute, Ind., and Samuel Woolford of San Antonio. Mr. Woolford died in 1918.
Mr. and Mrs. Woolford lived in Galton for a number of years. Mr. Woolford engaging in the grain and general merchandising business. Later, they moved to Terre Haute, where they remained until Mr. Woolford’s death. Following Mr. Woolford’s death, Mrs. Woolford moved to San Antonio to make her home with her son.

“Death of Former Arcola Resident,” Journal Gazette (Mattoon, Illinois), 16 July 1931, page 1; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 12 July 2021).

Everything in the above obituary fits what I already knew about the family — EXCEPT — the location of her death. I had her death recorded as having happened in Idaho and not Texas. Thanks to Ancestry, I even have a copy of the Idaho death certificate.

Idaho, Death Records, 1890-1967, Caroline Woolford, 13 July 1931; database with images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 14 June 2021).

So, are these records for two different people OR for the same person? I believe they are for the same person.

  • The informant on the death certificate is Ross Woolford. The obituary includes a son named Ross.
  • The obituary indicates that Ross Woolford lived in Rupert, Idaho. The death certificate indicates that Caroline Woolford died in Rupert, Idaho.
  • The death certificate lists William Kelso as the father of Caroline Woolford which agrees with the information I have on the family.
  • The obituary was found in a newspaper in the region where Caroline Kelso Woolford grew up and not in a newspaper where any of her children lived. So far, I haven’t located an obituary in Idaho, Texas or Indiana.
  • Caroline Woolford’s Find a Grave site states that she died in Idaho.

Until I find records to indicate that these records are for two different individual, I am concluding that the obituary is for Caroline Kelso Woolford, daughter of William and Caroline Kelso and mother of Ross, Alfred and Samuel. If I didn’t already have a lot of documented facts for this family, I would have had to reject the obituary.

So, the lessons I’ve learned by analyzing these records include:

  • Conflicting records do not necessarily indicate two separate individual
  • Having researched the entire family helped with the analysis of the conflicting records

Broken Record

Do you ever feel like you are encountering the same issues over and over when researching your family history? For researchers with roots in the southern states, this might be dealing with burned out counties. Since I’m just starting to really dig into Virginia records, I’m just beginning to deal with this challenge.

Instead, my issue is what I call ‘same name’ issues. I recently wrote about my issues figuring out two different Thurston K. Wells and have for years written about my James Crawford research. However, yesterday while trying to research the descendants of Hiram M. Currey of Peoria County, Illinois. I kept encountering trees showing that he died in 1874.

So, I searched my file for someone who had a death place containing Miami and a death date containing 1874. With this search of my RootsMagic file, I found Hiram Merrick Currey (7 Apr 1818 – 3 Mar 1874). In my file, I have this Hiram Currey married to Julia Wicker. Since I believe my Hiram Currey ancestor was a lawyer in Peoria County, Illinois, I started comparing these two men. Even though I don’t know when or where my Hiram Currey ancestor died, I do have a lot of facts for him in the 1820s and 1830s, including his admittance into the practice of law in 1822. To begin practicing law in Rush County, Indiana, in1822 my Hiram Currey ancestor had to have been born prior to 1818.

Wanting to include a short narrative report for Hiram Currey (1818-1874) and Julia Wicker in this blog post, I started checking out his Ancestry hints. And discovered that there are several Ancestry hints for a marriage between Hiram Currey and Julia Hatfield.

So, back to RootsMagic I go searching my file for Julia Hatfield. And, I find a third Hiram Currey. This one is a doctor who was born in 1827 and died in 1898.

So, that is THREE Hiram Curreys, all of them with a middle initial of M.

  • Hiram M. Currey, lawyer of Peoria County, Illinois who married Rachel Harris Whitaker
  • Hiram Merrick Currey (1818-1874), a Methodist minister who married Julia Wicker and died in Miami County, Ohio
  • Hiram Meyrick Currey (1827-1898), a physician who married Julia Hatfield and died in Spencer County, Indiana.

Since I have all of them in my file, is it possible they are related? As it turns out the minister and the doctor are first cousins. If I’m correct about my ancestors’ grandfather, then they are all first cousins. All with very similar names, all likely first cousins.

Below is a family group sheet for the Methodist minister.

Below is a family group sheet for the doctor.

Anyone wishing sources for any of the above Hiram Currey’s can leave a comment on this blog. One can also check out my Ancestry tree, Heartland Genealogy:

Rigby Printing Company

Do you do descendency research? If so, do you sometimes find yourself following a cousin’s family that takes you off on a tangent that doesn’t really connect to your family?

Well, that’s where some of my research regarding the Rigby family is taking me. I recently visited the gravesite of Elizabeth Jane Currey Rigby, daughter of Hiram Currey and Angelina Burke Currey. Elizabeth was the second wife of Robert M. Rigby.

As mentioned in his obituary, Robert M. Rigby was the president of R. M. Rigby Printing Company.

Robert M. Rigby Dies
End to Printing Company Head is at 74
Robert M. Rigby, 74 years old, president of the R. M. Rigby Printing Company, 915 Wyandotte street, and a printer here since 1884, died last night of heart disease at his home, 3816 the Paseo.
Mr. Rigby was known widely in printing circles. He was born in Chicago and came to Kansas City when a young man. He had been in ill health several years. Mr. Rigby leaves his widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Rigby, of the home, two daughters, Mrs. Helen Ranson, Detroit, and Mrs. Grace G. Bennett, Hollywood, Cal.
Funeral services will be at 2:30 o’clock Monday at the home. The Rev. Burris A. Jenkins will conduct the services.

“Robert M. Rigby Dies,” The Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Missouri), 14 February 1932, page 23; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 29 May 2021).

A search of Newspapers.com in the Kansas City area for Rigby Printing produced an article about the filing of articles of association for the Rigby printing and stationary company.

A New Printing Company

The Rigby printing and stationary company filed its articles of association withthe county recorder yesterday. It has a capital stock of $22,000, the incorporators being George Dugan, Walter C. Carr and Robert M. Rigby. The company will carry on a general printing, stationary and book binding business.

Curious about what happened to the R. M. Rigby Printing Company after Robert’s death, I did a broader search and discovered a 1965 article about a new building for the R. M. Rigby Printing Company.

A Google search turned up incorporation information for Rigby, the Visual Dynamics Corporation that referenced R. M. Rigby Printing Company.

Since Google didn’t produce a web site or any current information about the company, I returned to the newspapers where I found an article about the company filing for bankruptcy.

Rigby Files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy

Owners of the Rigby Corporation, a Lenexa printing company, have asked the U.S. district Court in Kansas City, Kansas, to initiate chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings.

The company, which operates in a 9-year-old, 100,000 square-foot plant at 14685 W. 10tth filed the request Tuesday. the petition lists assets of $6,307,208 and debts of $4,171,946; it lists other liabilities of $1,012845 and authorized capital of 4350,000.

Benjamin Franklin, federal bankruptcy judge, was to meet with Rigby officials this week to schedule a hearing.

The petition lists Robert P. Ingram as owning more than 25 per cent of the Rigby stock. No other persons were listed as owning more than 25 per cent. Ingram bought Rigby in March, 1972, from American Standard, Inc., a New York conglomerate.

Rigby was started as a printing company in 1883. It employs about 300 persons in three shifts. The company moved from 816 Locust in 1967.

Ingram, builder of the TenMain Center in the early 1960s, sold the building October, 1974, to Prudential Insurance Company of America. He bought KBEA-Radio from Intermedia, Inc., in September 1972, and KXTR-Radio from Senthesound Broadcasting Associations, Inc.

The land and factory building, funded by $1,325,000 in industrial revenue bonds are leased from Lenexa by Rigby, Don Capper, Lenexa administrative assistant said.

The Kansas City Times (Kansas City, Missouri), 29 Oct 1976, page 5.

Even though I have not uncovered what happened to the company immediately after Robert Rigby’s death, thanks to newspapers I’ve been able to document its move to Lenexa and then its move to bankruptcy court.

Forest Hills Part 2

Over Memorial Day weekend, my husband and I visited Forest Hills Cemetery in Kansas City, Missouri. During that visit, we located the Crider family plot and the Rigby family plot.

Like the Crider plot, the Rigby plot was on the South side of this historic cemetery in Block 23.

Buried in this plot were the following Rigby family members:

Since the FamilySearch site doesn’t have a death date for Robert, Jr., I decided to see what other sources I could find to verify the death. Thus, I searched Newspapers.com to look for an obituary, which I found in the Kansas City Star.

Death of Robert M. Rigby, Jr.
Robert M. Rigby, jr., 33 years old, died this morning at St. Mary’s Hospital. With his wife and a party of relatives, Mr. Rigby had spent last night at an amusement park. Returning home, 820 Charlotte Street, he suffered an attack of convulsions. He was taken to St. Mary’s, where he died soon after. Dr. Fritz Moennighoff, deputy coroner, said death was due to uraemic poisoning. Besides the widow a daughter, Myrtle Rigby, his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Rigby, sr., three sisters, Miss Helen Rigby, Miss Grace Rigby and Miss Dorothy Rigby, and a brother Glen Rigby, survive.

“Death of Robert M. Rigby, Jr.,” The Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Missouri), 1 June 1915, page 4; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 29 May 2021).

Then, in an attempt to figure out Robert Rigby Senior’s children, I looked for his obituary. This obituary only names two children: Helen and Grace.

Robert M. Rigby Dies
End to Printing Company Head is at 74
Robert M. Rigby, 74 years old, president of the R. M. Rigby Printing Company, 915 Wyandotte street, and a printer here since 1884, died last night of heart disease at his home, 3816 the Paseo.
Mr. Rigby was known widely in printing circles. He was born in Chicago and came to Kansas City when a young man. He had been in ill health several years. Mr. Rigby leaves his widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Rigby, of the home, two daughters, Mrs. Helen Ranson, Detroit, and Mrs. Grace G. Bennett, Hollywood, Cal.
Funeral services will be at 2:30 o’clock Monday at the home. The Rev. Burris A. Jenkins will conduct the services.

“Robert M. Rigby Dies,” The Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Missouri), 14 February 1932, page 23; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 29 May 2021).

Robert M. Rigby was married twice. His first marriage was to Ellen Curtin by whom he had at least 4 children: Robert M. Rigby, Grace Rigby Bennett, Helen Rigby Pinkley and Francis Rigby. According to an obituary in the 28 Dec 1892 issue of the Kansas City Times, Ellen Rigby died 27 Dec 1892.

Mrs. Nellie Rigby, wife of R. M. Rigby, died at her home, 2012 Baltimore avenue, at 5 o’clock yesterday morning of pneumonia, aged about 32 ears. The funeral will occur tomorrow morning. Mrs. Rigby leaves five children.

“Tips from Tuesday,” The Kansas City Times (Kansas City, Missouri), 28 December 1892, page 8; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 23 June 2021).

Even though Ellen’s obituary does not name the children, it does indicate that there were five children. I currently have only identified four of those children: Robert M. Rigby Jr, Grace Rigby Bennett, Helen Rigby Rason and Francis Rigby.

After the death of his first wife, Ellen, Robert M. Rigby married Elizabeth Jane Currey on 8 Feb 1894 in Jackson County, Missouri. Eight years later, Robert’s 12 year old daughter by his first wife, Francis, would take her life.

Girl of 12 a Suicide
Frances Rigby, Fearing a scolding for Being Tardy at School, Takes Carbolic Acid
Died at City Hospital
She wandered about in the Rain after Getting the Poison and took it in a Vacant Lot
Joined Church Week Ago
The child was the daughter of R. M. Rigby, President of the Rigby Printing Company

Frances Rigby, 12 years old, daughter of Robert M. Rigby, president of the Rigby Printing company, whose residence in Hyde Park is at 111 East thirty-Ninth street, ended her life yesterday afternoon by swallowing most of the contents of a two-ounce vial of carbolic acid. As far as can be learned the only reason for the child’s deed was that she was late at school yesterday morning and was afraid of a scolding either from her teacher or at home.

“Girl of 12 a Suicide,” The Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Missouri), 25 April 1902, page 1; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 23 June 2021).

Since Elizabeth Currey Rigby’s children (Glenn and Dorothy) preceded her in death, her obituary doesn’t provide any clues to the children of Robert M. Rigby by his first wife.

Mrs. Elizabeth Rigby Services
Services for Mrs. Elizabeth Rigby, 70, formerly of 3816 the Paseo, will be held at 3:30 o’clock friday at the Freeman chapel. Burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery. She was the widow of Robert M. Rigby, founder of the R.M. Rigby Printing Company, 816 Locust street.

“Deaths in Greater Kansas City,” The Kansas City Times (Kansas City, Missouri), 7 June 1945, page 11; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 23 June 2021).

Even though I haven’t identified the fifth child of Robert M. Rigby and Ellen Curtin Rigby, I have found a clue in an article found while searching for Robert Rigby Jr’s obituary. Robert Rigby, Jr. was stabbed in a bar fight by his brother-in-law James W. Dix.

Robert Rigby, Jr., Stabbed
James W. Dix Wounded His Brother-In-Law in a Saloon Fight
Robert Rigby, jr., vice-president of the C.H.R. Bindery and a son of R. M. Rigby of the R. M. Rigby Printing Company, is at his father’s home, 27 Janssen Place, suffering from stab wounds inflicted by his brother-in-law, James W. Dix. The two fought Friday night in a saloon at Eighth and Main streets where Rigby had gone in response to a telephone call informing him that Dix was there and drinking heavily.
Dix was arrested after the fight, but was released. He is said to be in Texas now. Rigby’s wounds, cuts about the head and back, were treated at the emergency hospital and he was sent to his father’s home. Rigby told his parents that he found Dix at the saloon in a quarrelsome mood and when he tried to persuade him to go home Dix attacked him with a knife.
R. M. Rigby, the father, said today that Dix probably would not be prosecuted. He declared his son’s injuries were not dangerous.

“Robert Rigby, Jr. Stabbed,” The Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Missouri), 29 November 1910, page 1; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online 23 June 2021).

Since none of the known daughters were married to James W. Dix, the missing child is likely the daughter married to James W. Dix. So far, she is still a mystery.

Without this trail of obituaries and other articles, I would not have been able to piece together much of Robert M. Rigby’s family.

Land Dispute

#52Ancestors #Conflict

Do you have copies of records that have never been transcribed? I know that I have quite a few in my files. That is one of the reasons I’m going back thru my direct line ancestors and creating narrative reports. In the process of creating those reports, I’m making sure I work on transcribing their records.

I recently started working to update the descendants of Hiram M. Currey of Peoria County, Illinois. In the process, I noticed a fact for a land dispute with an incomplete source. That source turned out to be Box 29 from the Peoria County, Illinois court records for the H. M. Curry vs Isaac Underhill case.

Unfortunately, the documents in the box do not indicate who won the court case.

Below is a transcription of those documents:

Peoria County, Illinois
Court Records Box 29

H.M. Curry vs Isaac Underhill

Copy obtained by Fred Vatko (Peoria County Genealogical Society)

Quincy
No 8250
Hiram M Curry
Recd in letter from this
[Honl] John T Stuart, dated
30 Dec 1839

Sec Comm & reply of
The 2 Jany 1840

———————————————————
State Bank of [Illinois] 45 {?] 4.20
Receiver’s Office, Quincy, Illinois
No. 8250
May 30 1836
Received from Hiram M Currey
Of Peoria County, Illinois the sum of
Forty four
Dollars and twenty cents, being in full payment for the
Southwest fractional
Quarter of section five
Township No. Ten north of the base line of Range Nine
East of the 4th principal meridian, containing thirty five
Acres and 36/100 of an acre at the rate of one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre
$44.20 Tho Carlin receiver

Pre act 1834
Conflicting with county
7392


No. 8250
30 May 1836
I Hiram M Curry
Of Peoria
County, and State of Illinois do hereby apply for the purchase of the South
West fractional qr of section numbered five
in township numbered ten north of range numbered
Nine East of the fourth principal meridian
containing thirty five 36/100 acres
35.36
8.84
44.20
According to the returns of the Surveyor General, for which I have agreed with the Register to
give at the rate of one dollar and twenty five cents per acre.

I, Samuel Alexander, Register of the Land Office at Quincy, Illinois, do hereby certify
that the quarter section above described, contains 35 36
acres, as mentioned; and that the price agreed upon is $1.25 per acre
Re Act 1834
[?]icting 7392
Saml Alexander, Register

[CUMBERLAND COUNTY}

State of illinois
Peoria County

I Thomas Phillips County Surveyor within & for the aforesaid county; do
hereby state on oath, that I surveyed in the year 1837 fractional section
#5 10 North Range 9 East of the 4th principal meridian; and that no part of
the south west fractional quarter of the fractional section aforesaid bore any
appearance of ever having been enclosed or cultivated. The cultivation by which
it appears Hiram M Currey proved a right of presumption to the said fractional
quarter; was on the adjoining patented quarter. The nearest part of the said cultivation
does not come within fourteen chains, of the fractional quarter claimed by Curry.
deponent further states that certificate signed by himself and forwarded to the
commissioner of the general land office certifying that “Curry’s improvements
were on said fraction aforesaid; was an imposition practised on said deponent
by one Charles Balla[ne] of Peoria, Ills; and that said deponent signed the same
without fully understanding the contents of said certificate; said deponent
further states from the best of his knowledge & belief the above plat of said
fractional qtr claimed by Curry is a correct on; given under my
hand this twenty fourth day of May in the year


One thousand eight hundred & thirty Eight
[?] Phillips CSPC

Subscribed and sworn to before me William Mitchell
Clerk of the County Commissioners Court within and
For the County of Peoria and State of Illinois this
26 day of May AD 1838. Given under my hand
and seal of said Court of Peoria
this 26 day of May AD 1838
William Mitchell
Clerk


Survey & Affidavit of
Thos Philipps County Surveyor
Peoria Cy Ill. Relative to
Twp 5 10N 9E

In relation to Hiram M
Curry’s claim to sd qr section
G.S.O.
Fifled by King & Wilson 9th
Jun 1838
C.S.P.

Rec’d June 1838


Surveyor’s Office
Peoria County
State of Illinois

I Thomas Phillips sur-
veyor of said county do
hereby certify that I have
surveyed section no five in township ten
North of the base line and range nine east of the
fourth principal meridian according to
the original field notes a copy of which I
have procured from the surveyor general’
office at St. Louis and find by accurate
measurement that the East and West line run-
ning through the middle of said sec-
tion runs through the field said to have been
cultivated by Hiram M. Curry in the year
1833 dividing it in such a manner as to throw
a part of said cultivation on the South
West fractional quarter and the reside which
is much the larger portion on the north
West fraction quarter of said section given
from under my hand at my office this 26
Day of November 1836
Thomas Phillips SPC


State of Illinois
Peoria County

I William Mitchell Clerk of the County Commissioners
Court within & for said County,do hereby certify that
Thomas Phillips Esqr is the County Surveyor within and for the County
of Peoria aforesaid (duly commissioned & qualified) that his commission
was dated on the 12th day of August A.D. 1835 and will expire in
August 1839 — as it appears to me of record in my office and
that his signature following certificate is genuine
in testimony whereof I have hereunto set
my hand and seal of said Court at
Peoria this 15th day of May AD 1838
William Mitchell
Clerk

I Charles Ballan[ce] upon oath do state that the above certificte of
Thomas Phillips was signed by him in my presence
C Ballance

Subscribed & sworn to before me
This 15 day of May AD 1838
William Mitchell
Clk County Commissioners
Court Peoria County
Ills


State of Illinois
Peoria County
I Linus Scovil of lawful age being
girst duly sworn depose and say that I am the
justice of the peace of said county before whom
the witnesses were sworn who established Hiram
M. Curry’s right of re-emption to the South West
fractional quarter of Section No 5 in Township
10 North of the base line and Range No 9 East of the
4th principal meridian when James Cannon and Har-
ris Whittaker were afterwords brought before me by
Isaac Underhill to recount upon oath the statements
they had formerly made I at first refused to
swear them to said last mentioned affidavits on ac
count of its apparently involving them in perjury
and I inquired of them their motive for so great in-
consistency. They informed me that Isaac Underhill
and Jefferson Taliaferro (who had [floated] on said
Curry’s claim) informed them that they (said Under-
hill & Taliaferro) had had said land surveyed and
had ascertained that no part of the field which said
Curry had cultivated in 1833 was on said tract
of land and therefore as said Curry had [during] said
was cultivated nowhere else they were guilty of perjury
in swearing he had cultivated a part of said
tract during said year and that said Underhill
and Taliaferro had threated to persecute them for
perjury unless they wold recant upon oath
the statements aforesaid respecting said Curry’s
pre-emption. I further state that I am well
acquainted with all the parties and the premises in
dispute that said Curry is a poor man who to
my certain knowledge has lived upon the land
in dispute ever since some time in the year
1832 until a few months past his family has


Been absent (as is said) upon a visit to distant
relatives That I called to see said Curry some
time the fall of 1833 and found him sowing
a crop of wheat and had at the time a crop of corn
and pumkins grown The field he was cultivating
was always understood to be the fraction of section
5 township 10 North of range 9 East partly on the
NW qr and partly on the SW qr but having [nev]
er surveyed it can not say possibly where an East
& west line would run but have no dougt that
the house and part of the field are on the SW frac-
tional quarter Said Witnesses are vry young
and could I presume be easily frightened or per-
suaded to make such recantation without any criminal
intention I was at the time said Curry settled on
said land living in said neighborhood and have
ever since lived there Given from under my
hand this 28th day of January 1837.
Linus Scovill (seal)

State of Illinois
Peoria County

This day personally appeared
Before me William Mitchell
A notary Public of said County Linus Scovill
personally known to me to be the identical
person who subscribed and swore to the foregoing
instrument of [[writing] and deposed that the
statements therein made are just and true
according to the best of his knowledge & beliefs
I also certify that the said Linus Scovill is
a man of integrity & credibility and that his
statements on oath may be relied on Given
under my hand and seal notarized
at Peoria this 28th January AD 1837
William Mitchell


I Alexander [Forsh] being of lawful age and first duly
sworn testify that sometime in the summer of the
year 1836 in the town of Peoria I heard a conver-
sation between Isaac Underhill and another indi-
vidual respecting his speculations at Rome on the
Illinois River in which said Underhill boasted of
having defeated the pre-emption of a settler in that
neighborhood by procurring his witnesses to swear that
their affidavits by which they established the pre-emp-
tion were not true In that part of the conversation
which was in my hearing he stated distinctly that he had
paid one of said witnesses to with William M. E. Bogar-
dus the sum of two hundred dollars or four hundred
dollars (I am not certain which) to procure him to go
before a justice of the peace and recant upon oath
his former affidavit My impression is that he
did not give the name of the person whose pre-emp-
tion he had endeavored to destroy but he described it
as being a fraction and otherwise so spoke of it as
to have no doubt that it was the pre-emption of
Hiram M. Curry to which he alluded and further this
affiant [soweth] not
Alex H Fash

State of Illinois
Peoria County
I William Martin a justice of the peace
in and for said county do hereby certify that
on the ninth day of November A D 1837 person
all appeared before me Alexander H [Forsh] and
was by me sworn to the truth of the foregoing
affidavit given under my hand the date
aforesaid
W Martin J P


State of Illinois
Peoria County

I, William Mitchell, Clerk of the County
Commissioners’ Court for said county, do hereby certify that William
Martin, Esquire, whose name appears to the foregoing certificate, was, on
the day of the date thereof, an acting Justice of the Peace, in and for the county
aforesaid, duly commissioned and qualified, as it appears to me of record in my
office; and that, as such, full faith and credit are due to all his official acts.
In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my
hand, and affixed the seal of said court, at Peoria
this Seventh day of December 1839
William Mitchell Clerk


I Charles Ballomce do solemnly swear that shortly
after Isaac Underhill had filed the affidavits of
William M C [Bojordne] and others in the land office
to defeat H. M. Curry’s right of pre-emption to a tract of
land adjoining Rome in the county of Peoria Ill that
said Curry state to me that said Bogardus had ackn-
owledged to him that said Underhill had bribed him
for the sum of four hundred dollars to swear to an affi
davit contradicting his former affidavit which he
[had] given to establish said Curry’s pre-emption
that supposing if said statement was
true it was not susceptible of proof I paid little
attention to it until about two months ago said Curry in-
formed me he could prove said charge by Alexander H.
[Forsh] part not having an opportunity to take his
affidavit then and his residence being several
miles from here I had not a convenient opportunity
to take it until November 9th last past and it was not
then forwarded to the general land office because I
wished to procure furthere testimony especially
the testimony of Luther sears who was an associate
of said Underhill and who I understood from Forst
knew all about it On this day I called on said Sears who stated
that he heard said [Bocardus] and Underhill bargain-
ing about said affidavit Underhill offered a price
to Bocardus if he would upon oath recant his former affidavit
Bocardus refused to do it for the price offered but agreed
to do it for a large price after a number offers were
made and refused a sum was agreed upon and


the affidavit was made out and sworn to by said Bocardus,
and the price paid by said Underhill, as he understood from
them both, but what was the amount paid said Sears,
could not recollect. After said matter was arranged said
Sears stated that said Underhill explained the transaction
to him and told him that it was Hiram M. Curry’s pre-
emption claim near Rome that said affidavit was
taken to defeat. Said Underhill explained his having to give
so high a price for this affidavit to be that in addition
to the reluctance of the witness to contradict himself he was
interested in Curry’s claim, and it was necessary to give
him more then his interest amounted to to get him
to swear against Curry said Seas who seemed to know all about
the said transaction stated that he had ‘no doubt there was
perjury in the business.” I then asked him if he would
give an affidavit stating these fact, to which he answere-
ed that being a friend of Mr.Underhills he would not
give any statement on oath on the subject, unless required
in a court of justice and in this case he would swear
to the facts as declared to me and related above and further this affi
ant [south] not
Charles Balland
Subsribe and sworn to before me this 7th day
of December AD 1839. In testimony whereof
I have hereunto set my hand and
seal of the County Commissioners Court
of Peoria County, Sate of Illinois this
day & year last aforesaid
william Mitchell Clk


State of Illinois
Peoria County

Clerks Office County Commissioners [County]
William Mitchell clerk of said Court
do hereby certify that Linus Scovill Esqr whose
name appears written to the within certificate was at
this time the same was made an acting Justice
of the Peace in and for said County duly
Commissioned and qualified as affiant of
record in my office and that as such full
faith and credit an [act of rights] ought
to be given to [?] his official acts given
under my hand and seal
said Court at Peoria this
25th day of May AD 1836
William Mithcell
Clk Co Commr PC


8250
Cancelled
Quincy

Money ordered to be re-
funded by the Secretary
of the Treasurey — See letter
to the Regt & Recv dated
11th April 1845

Cancelled

Money ordered to be
refunded see letter to
R & R 3d Oct 1838

See letter from Honr John t
Stuart enclosing live affidavits
herewith filed — & letter dated 30th
Dec 1839 – & Commr reply of 2 Jany
1840 – also letter to R&R of same
date


We James Cannon and Harris Wittaker
do solemnly swear that Hiram M curry
is not entitled to a preemption to the South
West fractional qtr of Sec No 5 10 N 9 East
for which he has our evidence to his
preemption papers being date 19th March
AD 1836, we were at together unacquainted
with the boundarys of said fractional qr
until a recent survey of the same
and hereby swear that said Curry
never cultivated any part thereof to
our knowlege as set forth in said
preemption papers
James Cannon
his
Harris Wittaker
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 24th day of May 1836
Linus Scoville
Justice of the Peace


I William M C Bogardus hereby make
oath that Hiram M Curry is not entitled
to a presentation to the SW fractional qr
of Sec no 5 10 North 9 East for which
he has my affadavit concerning I do
not want the Register to receive said
affadavit as there is a mistake inthe
same and further that I swear
that the section lines do not
come within three or four rods of teh
fence where he states that he cultivated
the same, and further one of the [whitnesses]
is Curry’s own son, and the other is
under age
[W M ? Bogandus]

State of Illinois
Peoria County
I Lewis Bigelow, an acting
Justice of the Peace within and for
the county of Peoria, hereby certify that on the 23d day
of May AD 1836 the above named William M. C. Bogar
dens personally appeared before me and made oath to
the truth of the foregoing affidavit by him subscribed

Lewis Bigelow, J. Peace


State of Illinois
Peoria County
Clerks Office County Commissioners Court
William Mitchell Clerk of said Court
I hereby certify that Lewis Bigelow Esqr whose
name appears to the foregoing certificate was at
the time the same was mad an acting Justice
of the Peace in and for said county regularly
commissioned and qualified as appoint of
record in my office and as such full
faith and credit are[and ? rights]
[?] given to are his official acts. In Tes-
timony whereof I have hereunto
set my hand and seal of said
County at Peoria this twenty fifth
day of May A.D. 1836
William Mitchell
Clk


Cancelled
Certificate
8250
and proof belonging thereto

Certificate Cancelled
See letter to R & R 3d Oct
1838 also letter
from the Hon John T stuart
dated 30 Oct 183[7] & Commr
reply of 2d Jany 1840 & letter
of same date to R & R


Charles Ballance of Peoria of lawful age deposes
and says in addition to his foregoing that he
has been acquainted with Hiram M Curry
since early in 1832 That in the latter part
said year this deponent and said Curry were
two of the Commissioners appointed by the County
of Peoria to locate a road towards Knoxville to
pass on the North line of the above described
tract that this deponent was then in the house
of said Curry and has frequently been on
the premises same and states of his own knowl-
edge that said Curry has ever since resided on
said land with his family neither has
he ever heard of his having had any othe rhome
during said time nor has he heard of any
other person having a claim to said land
unti the last week
C Ballance
Subscribed & Sworn to
before me on this 30th
day of May 1836.
J H [Racton] J. P.


Sworn to and subscribed before me on this 19th day
of March 1836
Linus Scovill J P

We do swear that the subscribing witnesses to the
within preemption proof are persons of
respectability and their oath entitled to credit
William, Fletcher, Thompson
Linus Scoville junr
Swortn to and subscribed before me on this
26th day of March 1836
Linus scovill JP

I do hereby certify that the above named wienesses
are persons of respectability and their oath entitled
to credit
Linus Scovill J P

State of Illinois
Peoria County
To wit: William Mitchell clerk of the county
Commissioners Court for said county do certify that Linus
Scovill Esqr whose name appears to the foregoing certificates
was on the day of the date therof an acting Justice of the Peace
in and for said county, dully commissioned and qualified
[seal covering ] to me of record in my office and that as such
[seal covering] and credit are due & are his official acts
In testimony whereof I have hereunto
set my hand and affixed the seal of said
Court at Peoria this 21st day of may 1836
William Mitchell, Clk


I do solemnly swear that I was in actual occupancy
of and raised a crop on the South west fractional
qr of sec 5 town 10 north of range 9 East of the
4th principal meridian in the year 1833 and
that I was in actual possession and occupancy
of the same at the passage of the law on the 19th
of June 1834 and am still in possession and I
hereby apply to enter the same by preemption
agreably to the Act of Congress in that care
made and provided
Hiram M Currey
Sworn to and subscribed before me on this
19th day of March 1836
Linus Scovill JP

We do solemnly swear that Hiram m Currey was
in actual occupancy of and raised a crop on the South
west fractional qr of Sec 5 in Town 10 North of Range
9 East of the 4th principal Meridian in the year
1833 and that he was in actual occupancy of the same
on the 19th of June 1834 and still is in possession
and that we are not interested directly or indirectly
in his obtaining a preemption
Silas Allen
Hames Camon
Harris (his mark) Whitaker


To the Honorable Thomas Ford Judge of the
Peoria Circuit Court in Chancery sitting humbly
complaining showeth unto your Honor your [or tor]
Hiram M. Curry that heretofore to wit in the year one
thousand eight hundred and thirty [twp] your orator found
the south West fractional quarter of section no. five Township ten
North of the base line and Range nine East of the
fourth principal meridian vacant and unoccupied
land belonging to the government of the United States of
America and your orator being desirous of obtaining a
home in this part of the country and aid land having
not then been proclaimed for sale took possession
thereof with the intention of making thereon a preman-
nent home and paying for the same when it should
be offered for sale by the government Your orator fur-
there showeth unto our Honor that he cultivated a portion
of said fractional section of land in and during the year
AD one thousand eight hundred thirty-three
and had a dwelling house thereon which he was living
with his family on the nineteenth of June A D 1834
and was consequently entitled to enter a right of pre-emp
tion thereto under the laws of Congress of said last and
was thereby entitled to buy said tract at one dollar and twen-
ty five cents per acre at any time before the nineteenth
day of June A D 1836 And your orator well hoped
that he would be permitted the peaceable enjoyment of
his [family] home made in those early times amidst
privations and dangers But now so it is may
it Please your Honor one Isaac Underhill who
is hereby made a defendant to this bill sometime
the second day of April in the year A D 1836
went
to the land office at Quincey Illinois and fraudently represented said
tract of land to the Register of said land office as
government land on which no right of pre-emption


existed and entered said land by means of a floating
right obtained under said pre-emption law in the name of
one Charles Hayes who is hereby prayed to be made a
defendant to this bill And afterwards to wit
in or about the second day of My Ad 1836 the said
Underhill presured said Hayes to make an assignment
of said tract of land to one Jefferson Taliaferro who is
also prayed to be made a defendant to
this bill
Your orator further shares that in the
month of April AD 1836 said Underhill surveyed said
tract into town lots and had a plat thereof made and
recorded in the recorders office of said county under the
name of ‘Taliaferro’s Additon Rome’ and on the
fifteenth of said month obtained from said Taliferro
a deed to a portion thereof but whether the whole legal
title that said Taliaferro obtained or may [cu] supposed
to have obtained from said Hayes has been conveyed
to said Underhill your orator does not know
And your orator showeth unto your honor that said
Underhill further to embarrass and defraud your orator sold divers
portions of said tract of land to divers persons
whose names are at present unknown to your orator but
whose names when ascertained your orator prays may
[?] have and they made defendants hereunto
Your orator further showeth unto your honor that your
orator during the existence of said pre-emption land to wit
on the day of June AD 1836 procured all the neces-
sary proofs to be filed in said land office to establish a
right of pre-emption in your orator to said tract of land
whereupon said register and Receiver decided that your
orator was entitled to said land notwithstanding the


orator was entitled
———————
said entry made by said Underhill as aforesaid and
your orator thereupon bought said land of said Register
and Receiver pursuant to the provisions of said pre-
emption law and received the usual duplicate receipt
showing that fact which duplicate is herewith shown
to the court and prayed to be taken as a part of this
bill Your orator further showeth unto your Honor
that after said last mentioned entry or purchase was
made said Underhill procured and sent tot he commissioners
of the general land office, certain affidavits tending to prove that
if the line between the North and South halves of said
section was properly surveyed the cultivation would fall on the
north half whereas his house was on the South half to
rebut which your orator procured and sent to the commissioner
of the General land office an official certificate of the county
surveyor of Peoria county certifying that he had run said
line bounding to the original field notes and a portion of said
cultivation was on the tract in controversy on the
reception of which said commissioner adjudged your
orators evidence conclusive but for form’s sake sent
back the surveyors certificate with a request that the
county seal might be attached to[document] the official
[hamiter] of said surveyor whereupon your orator [pro-]
[red]said sent to be attached this to with the certificate of
said clerk that of the official character of said surveyor
and all that said commissioners required being complied
with your orator rested cont[ent] and well hopes the
question was settled forever but to your orators utter as-
tonishment and dismay some months afterwards he
received a letter from Samuel [Leech] Commissioner of the
said land office at Quincy enclosing a copy of a letter
which it was stated that the claim of your orator was
adjudged bad and the claim of said Underhill who
held under said Haye’s as aforesaid adjudged good and
that it was filed away for a patent to issue in due
course


And afterwards to with on the twenty first day of
January AD one thousand eight hundred and forty a
patent was made out in due form granting said land
absolutely from the United States to said Charles’ Hayes

But if your orator charges
the legal title to said land is in said Hayes and has
not passed so said Taliaferro Underhill& many of their
[minders] for your orator charges that said assignment
is not such an instrument as can pass the legal
title in said premises
All of which outings and doings of the said under
Hayes, Taliaferro and their confederate are contrary
to equity and good [measure] and tend to the many
injury and impoverishment of your orator whereupon
you as much as your orator is without relief under the [strict]
ness of the common laws but is re[trevable]
in a court of equity only where matters of this


sort are properly cognizable and relievable therefore
May it please your honor to grant unto your orator
the People’s most gracious writ of summons to be directed
to the said Isaac Underhill, Charles Hayes and Jefferson
Taliaferro thereby commanding them and each of them at
a certain day and under a certain point therein to be lim[it]
personally to be and appear before your Honor in this Honora
ble court and then and there the said Hayes’ or his corporate oath
and the said Underhill and Taliaferro without full true [?]
perfect answers make to all and singular the premises
And may the said Hayes be required to answer on oath afore-
said particularly whether he was entitled to a floating right to
any land under the pre-emption law aforesaid and
if he was what facts [earsted] to entitle him thereto and
more particularly whether he lived on government land or
on land that had long before been granted to or private indi-
vidiual on the nineteenth day of June A D 1834
And whether the South West fractional quarter of section
five in Township ten North of the base line and Range nine
East of the fourth principal meridian was entered by him or by another
in his name without his consent and whether he has
since conveyed the same away to any other person or
persons. If he h[ears] to whom he has conveyed And may
the said Underhill and Taliafero parties only state without
oath as aforesaid what title they jointly or severally have in
said premises what parts they have sold to each other or to
others at what time and to whom sold and for what price
And may said Hays, Underhill and Taliferro
be compelled
to execute and deliver to your orator a good and sufficient
deed of conveyance conveying to your orator all the right title
and interest which they or either of them has in said premises
with [increments] of warranty warranting said premises to your
orator against the acts of the said Hays Underhill and Talia-
fero by them sincerely done and [committed] and against
all persons claiming by through or under the person thus
warranting and further may they stand to abid
and perform such further orders direction and [direct]
therein as to your honor shall sum [mut]
And may it please your Honor to grant unto your
orator such other and further relief as equity any justice shall
require and to your Honor shall seem mut and your orator
as in duty bound will ever pray
Hiram M. Curry
Pr C. Bullance [solicitor]


Hiram M Curry
vs
Isaac Underhill et al
Bill in Equity

Filed July 7th AD 1840
William Mitchell


In this case the clerk will issue summons to the county
of Peoria against Isaac Underhill to the county of Tazewell
against Jefferson Taliferro and to the county of McDonough
against Charles Hayes
C. Ballance sol. for compt


The summon of Isaac Underhill to the bill
in chancery filed by one Hiram M
Curry in the Circuit Court for Peoria
County against himself Charles Hays
and Jeferson Taliaferro.
This respondent admits that the South
West fractional quarter of section five T 10 N
(E belonged to the government of the United
States in AD 1832, but he says it is [not true]
complainant cultivated any
portion of this tract of land in the
year AD 1833 nor at any time since
as the respondent is informed and
verily believes.
This respondent further says that he
never did represent tot he Register of the land
office at Quincy that no preemption rights
existed to said tract of land though had
such representation been [noodes] to want
have been justified by the facts He admits
that said Taliaferro purchased a floating
claim of said Hays and entered the said
tract of land in April 1836. Hays
then assigned the certificate of entry to said
Taliaferro who conveyed all his right
and interests in the land to this person
and by deed. He also admists that he laid off
the town of Rome on a portion of the said tract of land
and has since sold some of the lots to different
individuals.
This respondens also admits that the com-
plainant by misrepresenting the situation of
the land impose and some individuals
so far as to indue them to attempt to prove
a right of presumption in said Curry and this
respondent thinks it not impossible that
Register and Receiver of the land office
unsuspecting of a fraud and no [caus?]


evidence being before them might have per-
mitted to complainant to enter the land.
This respondent also admits to the time that
soon after the land it [sacmoured] that Curry
had been permitted to enter the land, to purchase
the affidavits of several persons acquainted
with the facts (among them were the witnesses
who proved Curry preemption) in which
affidavits it was stated that Curry never
had cultivated the aforesaid tract of land
This respondent also admits that one
Charles Ballance who was then acting as the
attorney for the complainant by misrepre-
senting to the county surveyor the course
of the lines indused him to give the certificate
mentioned in the bill, then the said Ballance
was enabled the to induce the county surveyor more easily to believe these
false statements, as he had been [coerced]
by surveyor himself was at time [prevailing]
This respondent also says that the said county
surveyor soon after he had given the certificate
to the said Ballance, discovered the [imposetion]
that had been practiced and him, and having
surveyed the land accurately according [to the] field
notes, gave this respondent a certificate stating
the above parts and was no appearance
of them said having been any cultivation on the
said tract of land. This respondent sent
the aforesaid testimony to the commissioner
of the General Land office and he thinks [?]
the complainent ought not to have been surprised,
should have issued to Hays after this fraud
had been thus fully brought tot he know-
ledge of the land officers.
This respondent admits that he sold
several of the towns lots laid off on said land
but when & to whom he cannot now
answer with precision having no mem


orandum of the sales. He thinks he sold the
most of them in AD 1836 and supposes that
the owners names may be found in the reco
ders office, as acceptable to the complainant
as to this respondent he has forgotten to whom
the lots were sold, and could only ascertain
them by searching the said records.
This respondent further answers and says that
he denies that the said complainant ever had a
right or preemption to the said South west fraction
quarter
And the respondent having
this fully answered [froze] that
he may be dismissed with his
costs.
Isaac Underhill

[?] known to befor
[?] 8 day of August 1840
William Mitchell


Deposition of George C McFaddon of the County of Peoria and
State of Illinois taken on the fifth and sixth days of October AD
1840 between the hours of 10 in the morning and five in evening of
the said Hays in the office of William Mitchell Clerk of the Circuit
Court within the said county to be used in evidence in a cause
pending in the Circuit Court of said County with Chancery
[bids] thereof wherein Hiram M Curry is complainant
and Isaac Underhill, Jeferson Taliaferro and Charles Hays are
defendants on behalf of the said defendants the said
George C McFadden doth depose Hays, in answer to
the following interrogations


1st Have you surveyed the South West qr Section five
Township 10 North Range 9 East of the [4] Meridian

Ans: He Has

2ns: State whether there is any appearance of cultivation
on said quarter

Ans: Witness was requested to examine as to whether
the said quarter had been cultivated and was not
able to discover that there had been anything like
cultivation upon it

3rd Had there been any cultivation upon it in the
year 1833 would have perceived the evidence
of it

Ans: should think there might

4th Is there any appearance of cultivation in the vicinity of this quarter?

Ans: witness refers to a map which is marked A and
made a part of this deposition, the place on said
map marked “orchard cultivated ground” and
the place marked “old cultivated ground called
the Taliferro place” appeared to have been cultivated
and they are the only places in the vicinity of said
quarter which have been cultivated

5th Are you the County surveyor of Peoria county
and is the said map is a correct survey of
said ground

Ans: witness is the county surveyor of Peoria County
and the map and survey is correct

Cross Examination by the complainant
1st What is the description of the said quarter section and
the adjacent ground?

Ans: Prairie

2nd: Are any of ancient corners of said section remaining

Ans: None that he could find

3rd: How did you ascertain the true position of the
line through the middle of said frac section?

Ans: witness commenced about a mile and a half
in the township line between ten North Eight & Nine
[fall] and run North to the center of section six north
west side then run East one mile to the quarter
section corner between five & six, then to [prove ther]
that was right run South to the river, thirty one
chains then run from same corner North to
the corner of section five & six on township line


the corner of Section five & six on township line

then run East 33 chains & 6 links to the Illinois
river, which comes out within a few [links] of
the field with distance and that witness judges
was about right

4th Is the bank of the River where the three lines as
laid down on the map strike it, a sudden
cliff or a gradual slope?

Ans: A gradual slope, a little rough on the start
but gradual afterwards

5th Do the lines as you have surveyed them terminate
at high or low water mark?

Ans: The North line would terminate at high
water [nexth] with the field [in the] distances, the
other two lines are about average distance
between high & low water marks

6th By what field notes did you survey this tract

Ans: by the field notes which witness purchased from
Captain Phillips the former County surveyor, and witness
has no doubts they are true copies of the original notes
as they have always agreed with his surveys

7th Have you any personal knowledge that they were
copied from the original field notes?

Ans: Has not


8th In running the lines of said quarter how much
did you allow for the variation of the compass?

Ans: Seven degrees & twenty minutes

9th If a mistake was made in the degree of variation
how much wold it make in missing a [field]

Ans: One chain and forty links

10th Is any part of the fence remaining on the South
side of the piece marked on the map “old cultivated
ground”?

Ans: thinks not

11th How far does the North line of said fractional
quarter run south of where cultivation appears
to have been as marked on the plat?

Ans: From fifty to seventy five links

By the defendants

Was the corner you started from, the one established
by the United States?

Ans: Witness supposed it was, on the township line
containing that quarter

What is the true varratin of the compass

Ans: seven degrees & twenty minutes


By the complainant

How did you ascertain the true variation of eh compass?

Ans: By running on different lines and making the
variation to follow said lines witness has been surveying
in Peoria County more or less for four years, and has
been county surveyor about a year
G. C. McFadden

State of Illinois
Peoria County
I William Mitchell Clerk of the Circuit Court
within and for said county do hereby certify that George C
McFadden was by me sworn to testify the truths, the
whole truth and nothing but the truth, as a witness in the
above entitled cause, and that foregoing deposition by him
submitted was taken as the time and place aforesaid and
reduced to writing by me
Given under my hand and seal
of said Court at Peoria this 6th day
of [December] AD 1840
William Mitchell
Clerk

Fees for taking Dep 1.87


Hiram M. Curry
vs
Underhill

Deposition of E McFaden Hays et al


A survey of teh S.W. quarter of Section5 Township 10 N R 9 E of teh 4th Prl Meredian
(For Isaac Underhill) Beginning at a part of sstone set for 1/4 secton corner between sections
5 7 6 thence East 20 chains to the bank of the Illinois river, thence S 30 [W] two chains
thence S 30 degrees E three chaines, thens S 56 degrees W four chains and fifty links, thence S 30 degrees W eight
chains, thens S 34 degrees W twelve chains, thens S 41 degrees W nine chanes (the corner described in the
field notes is destroyed) thence North thirty one chains to the place of beginnings, containg
31 83/100 acres of land, surveyed according tot he original field notes, July 22nd 1840
Variation 7 degrees 20 minutes
G. C. McFadden CSPC


A Survey of the
S.W. Qr of Sect. 5
T10 N R 9 E pr
Isaac Underhill

Attest William Mitchell

Forest Hill

As you visit the cemetery searching for the graves of relatives do you ever stand in awe of a monument? When I visit a military cemetery, I often feel overwhelmed by row upon row of tombstones, especially when they are decorated with flags or wreaths. Another time I remember being awestruck was when I saw my Crawford family tombstones still standing in the Eaton, Ohio cemetery from over 150 years ago.

When my husband agreed to go with me to Forest Hill Cemetery in Kansas City, Missouri over Memorial Day Weekend, I didn’t expect to stare in wonder at a family monument. I was just looking for the graves of cousins. I was limited to two requests for information on the location of the graves. Thus, I asked for a Rigby male and a Crider male hoping to get a family plot. And I lucked out with both!

Crider Family Monument

The Crider plot was in section 19 at the top of a hill on the South side of the cemetery looking over the rest of the cemetery.

This family plot is the final resting place for the Crider Brothers, of the Crider Commission Company.

The following Crider family members are named on the monument:

Driving around this historic cemetery, we encountered the grave of Satchel Paige. A quick Google search revealed more details about historic Forest Hill Cemetery.

While in this historic cemetery, I took photos of the stones to add them to Billion Graves and added the GPS coordinates to the Find a Grave memorials. These GPS coordinates are for a very very small part of Forest Hill Cemetery, but it is a start. Hopefully others will join in this effort and all of the graves in this historic cemetery will get coordinates added.

Coming Soon: Forest Hill Pt 2 – The Rigby plot

Mothers in My Tree

#52Ancestors #MothersDay

(Maiden names are being used)

(3) My Mom

  • Four children
  • 1 died infancy

(5) Winnie Letha Currey

  • Three children
  • 1 died in infancy
  • 1 died as a young adult prior to marriage

(7) Pauline Mentzer

  • Five children
  • 1 died around 9 months

(9) Josie Winifred Hammond

  • Seven children
  • 3 boys and 4 girls

(11) Winnie Mae Hutchinson

  • Nine children
  • one baby only lived a month
  • a second baby lived about 5 months
  • son, Henry Currey, died at age 13
  • Winnie died in 1913, leaving Herbert 18, Myrtle 14, Mary 12, Winnie 10, Earnest 7, and Alma 1 1/2
  • Total of 5 boys, 4 girls with 2 boys and 4 girls in 1913 when their mother died

(13) Frances Artlissa “Artie” Ricketts

  • Four children
  • 2 boys and 2 girls

(15) Nettie Adell Wells

  • Five children
  • 3 boys and 2 girls

(17) Mary Foster

  • Five children
  • 2 boys and 3 girls

(19) Sarah Ellen Ralston

  • Hammond Genealogy say 9 children
  • No documentation of first three children: William R. R. Hammond b 1864 and Homer L. Hammond b 1865 and Judson F. E. Hammond b 1866 found at this time
  • First three children have birth dates prior to her marriage
  • A fourth child, Glenn M. Hammond, is listed in the Hammond Genealogy. This child only lived one year. No other documentation found to date
  • Five documented children
  • 2 boys and 3 girls

(21) Angelina Jane Burke

  • Ten children
  • 6 boys and 4 girls

(23) Julia Harding

  • Eleven Children
  • Death dates currently unknown on 4 of the children: Frederick b1867, Cary b1869, Francesca b1879 and Elvira b 1884
  • 7 boys and 4 girls with 4 boys and 3 girls reaching adulthood

(25) Sarah Jane Thompson

  • Two children
  • 1 boy and 1 girl

(27) Rachel Elmeda Christy

  • Eight children
  • Set of twins did not survive. One died when almost one month old and the other died when a little over 3 months old.
  • 2 boys and 6 girls with 2 boys and 4 girls surviving to adulthood

(29) Emeline Minnick

  • Eight children
  • 6 boys and 2 girls

(31) Salome Adell Crandall

  • Four children
  • A boy, Freddie, lived about 7 years
  • A girl, Mary, lived about 9 months
  • Two girls survived to adulthood and married brothers

Criminal

#52Ancestors

This week’s #52Ancestors writing prompt is ‘Crime and Punishment’. When I think about looking for criminal acts in my tree, my first thoughts go to murderers, gun slingers or bank robbers. Since I don’t know of any ties to those types of criminals, I immediately thought of my ancestor who was accused of a ‘white collar’ crime, embezzlement.

Curious as to whether his profile was the only one where the ‘Criminal’ tag was used, I decided to print a “Fact List” report for the ‘Criminal’ tag.

That report pulled up two people: James H. Crawford and Hiram Mirick Currey.

James H. Crawford was the victim of a crime. However, Hiram Mirick Currey was accused of what amounted to embezzlement.

At the time of this accusation, Hiram Mirick Currey was serving as the treasurer of Ohio. The state of Ohio was in a battle with the federal government over states’ rights – over the right of the state to keep national banks out of the state.

In 1819, Ohio passed a law implementing a tax on the National Bank. In September, 1819, Ralph Osborn, the state auditor authorized the seizure of $100,000 from the Chillicothe branch of the United States.

According to the article, Osborn vs Bank of the United States, $120,000 was seized from the Chillicothe branch. These funds were were distributed as follows:

  • $20,000 returned to the National Bank since it was above the amount required to pay the tax
  • $2,000 was used to pay the men who ‘seized’ the tax
  • $98,000 turned over to the Ohio State Treasurer

According to an article in the 26 November 1819 issue of The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) a detailed list of the funds deposited in the Franklin Bank of Columbus.

  • $78,150 in notes of the Bank of the United States payable at their office of discount and deposit in Chillicothe
  • $2,090 in notes of the bank of the United States payable at their office in Philadelphia
  • $3,830 in gold coin
  • $16,000 in silver current coin of the U.S.

These funds totaled $100,070.

We give the following very extraordinary proceeding to the publick without comment.

The president, directors and company of the Franklin Bank of Columbus, John Kerr the president thereof in his official and individual capacity, William Nen cashier of said bank also in his official and private capacity and all other officers and servants of said bank, are hereby notified that the money and notes there lately deposited by Hiram Mirick Currey, as treasurer of Ohio, or in his individual capacity amounting to the sum of $100,070, to wit: 00 $78,150 in notes of the Bank of the United States payable at their office of discount and deposit in Chillicothe; $2090, in notes of the bank of the United States, payable at their office in Philadelphia; $3,830, in gold coin and $16,000 in silver current coin of the U.S. Belong to the president, directors and co. of the bank of the U.S. and were taken by force from the officers or their office of discount and deposit at Chillicothe in whose custody they have been placed by a certain John L. Harper, and by him transported to Columbus and deposited with the above named Hiram Mirrick Currey, either as treasurer of state or in his individual capacity, on or about the 17th day of Sept. last in violation of the annexed injunction issued by the7th circuit court of the U.S. for the Ohio district at their last Sept. session: And ye are hereby required and commanded to deliver over to Nathan Thompson, the treasure above described amounting to the sum of $100,070, who is hereby authorized to receive and receipt the same. And in case the same be not immediately paid over, ye are hereby further notified that proceedings at law will be immediately commenced against all of the as above described to compel the payment thereof with damages and costs.

WM. CREIGHTON, jr. Pres.

A.G. Claypool, Cash, Office Dis. and Deposit Bank of the U.S. at Chillicothe.
Nov. 12, 1819

The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) 26 November 1819. Available on Ancestry.com

In December, 1820, Hiram Currey was accused of owing the State of Ohio $11,111.

Whereas, it appears, by the report of the auditor of state, made to the present general assembly, that Hiram M. Curry, the late treasurer, stands indebted to the state in the sum of $11,111.

The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio). 28 Dec 1820. Available on Ancestry.com

In 1822, the Ohio legislature passed a resolution where Hiram Currey would turn over land to pay off the debt.

Mr. Parish moved a resolution, to authorize the present treasurer to receive from Hiram M. Currey, and his trustee, a conveyance for the real estate of said Currey. Also, to release the securities to the second bond given by said Currey, as treasurer, from the liability, upon payment of the costs of suits now pending against them. Also, to direct the suites against said Currey, and the securities to the first bond giver by said Currey as treasurer of state to be prosecuted to final judgment, &c. Which resolution was laid on table for consideration.

Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio: being the First Session of the Twentieth General Assembly (Columbus, Ohio: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1821), p. 284viewed online December 2017.

This fight between the state of Ohio and the National Bank resulted in a court case titled, Osborn vs Bank of the United States, that went all the way to the Supreme Court.

Trying to track down Hiram Mirick Currey and the details of this case has been a challenge for quite some time. There are still records to be found, but below is what I have compiled to date.

Hiram Mirick Currey

Myrack Curry was listed with 1 white male in the household in Tyrone Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in 1783.2

He was listed on the tax rolls as Mira Hiram Curry in 1786 in Fayette, Pennsylvania, United States.34

In 1790, Hiram was a preacher in the Elkhorn Conference of the Baptist Church in Mays Lick, Mason, Kentucky, United States.5

Miriach Curry was listed on the 1790 Fayette County, Pennsylvania census with 1 free white male and 4 free white females in the household.67

He  resided between 1792 and 1794 in Mays Lick, Mason, Kentucky, United States and was a Baptist preacher and teacher at the first school in Mays Lick.8

He was listed on tax rolls as Hiram Curry with 1 horse and 7 cattle in 1792 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.910

In 1792 Hiram was an admitted as candidate for ministry in Mays Lick, Mason, Kentucky, United States.5

He was listed on the tax rolls owning 200 acres on Stone Lick watercourse of Bull Creek of John Craig’s survey in 1793 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.11

He was witness to to the will of Benjamin Thraikill on 27 Mar 1793 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.12

Hiram was messenger, along with Cornelius Drake, to Elkhorn Baptist Association meeting representing Mays Lick church reporting 9 received by letter, 1 dismissed, 58 members in South Elkhorn, Fayette, Kentucky, United States.13

In 1794, he was a teacher in Mays Lick, Mason, Kentucky, United States.14

He was listed on tax rolls as Hiramirick Curry with 2 white males over 21, with 1 horse and 7 cattle and also listed as Hiram Cury with 100 acres of 2nd rate land on the Johnson watercourse in 1795 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.1517

Hiram was listed on tax rolls as M. Hiram Currey with 100 acres 2nd rate land on the Locust watercouse, 1 male over 21, 2 horses and 4 cattle in 1796 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.1819

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram Mirem Currey with 200 acres of 2nd rate land on Ball Creek Watercourse with 1 male over 21 and 2 horses in 1797 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.2021

He was messenger to Elkhorn Baptist Association meeting along with J. Singleton for Stone Lick Church reporting 42 baptised, 9 received by letter, 3 dismissed and 76 members in Clear Creek, Kentucky.13,22

Hiram  was listed on tax rolls between 1799 and 1801 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.23

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry with 200 acres on Stone Lick Bull Creek with 1 male over 21, 1 male over 16 and 1 horse in 1799 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.24

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry  with 150 acres 3rd rate land on the Stone Lick Watercourse and 1 male over 21 in 1800 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.2528

Hiram sold land being 50 acres of land on Stone Lick Creek that was part of the survey granted to John Craig by patent to James Luston on 30 Dec 1800 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.2930

He baptized Elder John Gutridge in the Ohio River three miles above Maysville in 1801 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.31

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry with 100 acres of 3rd rate land on the Bull Creek Watercourse with 1 male over 21 on 13 May 1801 in Mason, Kentucky, United States.32

Hiram was mentioned in minutes of meeting of Bracken Association of Baptists held on 19 Sep 1801 in Kentucky, United States.33

He performed marriage of Aquilla Denham and Harriet Thompson on 26 Jun 1804 in Adams, Ohio, United States.34

He performed marriage of Phebe Cary and Alexander Reed on 4 Jun 1805 in Franklin, Ohio, United States.35

Hiram was listed on tax rolls in 1806 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.3637

He was on the list of voters in 1806 in Salem Township, Champaign, Ohio, United States.38

He performed marriage of Thomas Morris to Margaret Dawson on 29 Jun 1806 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.39

Hiram was listed on tax roles as Mirach H. Curry in 1807 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.36,4041

He preached at the courthouse on 8 Jan 1807 in Ohio, United States.42

He preached a sermon after the Masonic oration after 22 Jun 1807 in Ohio, United States.43

Hiram held the office of state senator between 1808 and 1811 representing in Champaign, Ohio, United States.44

He performed marriage of John Ross to Margaret Price in 1808 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.39

He performed marriage of George Hunter and Ruth Fitch in 1808 in Urbana Township, Champaign, Ohio, United States.35,39

Hiram was appointed W. M. on a warrant empowering the lodge to hold meetings in Urbana and Springfield alternately in 1809 in Urbana, Champaign, Ohio, United States.45

He was appointed trustee of Miami University on 9 Feb 1809 in Ohio, United States.4647

On 17 Feb 1809, he was a member board of trustees of Miami University in Ohio, United States.48

Hiram officiated at marriage of Mr. George Hunter and Miss Ruth Fitch on 20 Apr 1809 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.49

He performed marriage of Wm H. Fyffe to Maxamilla Petty on 27 Sep 1809 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.39

He  performed marriage of John Thompson to Polly Frankerberger on 20 Nov 1809 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.50

Hiram was a member of the Ohio State Senate from the county of Champaigne.51

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hivans Curry in 1810 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.5253

His election to the Ohio Senate was contested by Alexander McBeth during a hearing in front of the Senate.54

Hiram represented Champaign county on the board of trustees for Miami County, Ohio on 12 Jan 1811 .55

He was a member of the general assembly for the state of Ohio.56

He was listed on the poll books on 8 Oct 1811 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.57

Between 1812 and 1814 in Urbana Township, Champaign, Ohio, United States Hiram was member  serving as Worthy Mason of Harmony Lodge No. 8 in Urbana, Ohio.58

He erected block house on banks of stream in 1812 in Logan, Ohio, United States.59

He was listed as trustee of Miami University on 14 Mar 1812 in Ohio, United States.6061

Hiram was on a ballet as a Republican elector of President and Vice President.62

He held the office of member of Ohio House of Representatives between 1813 and 1814 representing Champaign, Ohio, United States.55

He taught school in old tavern stand referred to as the old George Fithian and John Enoch stand on lot No. 63 about 1816 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.63

Hiram was listed on the tax rolls owning 170 acres in 1816 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.6465

He held the office of Representative from Champaign County, Ohio on 21 Nov 1816.66

He was listed on the tax rolls  in 1817 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.6768

Hiram was appointed state treasurer to replace W. M’Farland who resigned on 3 Jan 1817 in Ohio, United States.6978

He welcomed President Monroe to the Capital [of Ohio] by a neat and appropriate speech in Aug 1817 in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio, United States.7980

He, Treasurer of Ohio, along with Ralph Osborn, Auditor and Jeremiah McLene, Secretary, oversaw improvements in state prison about 1818 in Ohio, United States.8183

Hiram was listed on the tax rolls owning 170 acres of land on Buck Creek in 1818 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.8485

He was listed on the tax rolls owning 170 acres in 2 parcels on Buck Creek in 1819 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.8687

On 17 Sep 1819, he deposited $100,070 in the Franklin Bank of Columbus at Columbus Ohio. These funds were seized by John L. Harper from the Bank of the United States at Chillicothe.88

About on 19 Nov 1819 notice was served on the Auditor and Treasurer of the State of Ohio regarding the seizure of funds from the U.S. Bank in Chillicothe8992

Hiram was named as defendant in bill of injunction signed by C. W. Byrd, District Judge of the United States, in and for the District of Ohio on 22 Nov 1819 in West Union, Ohio.9293

He was summoned to appear in case filed by The United States of America, District of Ohio on 23 Nov 1819 in Chillicothe, Ross, Ohio, United States.92,94

He submitted report to General Assembly of the State of Ohio from office of Treasurer, State of Ohio on 6 Dec 1819 in Ohio,  United States.95

Hiram along with Ralph Osborn, Auditor; and the President and Directors of the Franklin Bank of Columbus were served with a writ of injunction from the Bank of the United States for the recovery of their money on 7 Dec 1819 in Ohio, United States.92,96100

On 21 Dec 1819 he sent letter to Thoms Rotch, Esqr to declare receipt of $5.25 toward tax on Adam Hoops land in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio, United States.101

He held the office of treasurer of the State of Ohio on 24 Dec 1819 in Ohio, United States.102103

About 1820 in Ohio, United States when the case (suit of attachment against Osborn & Harper) came to trial the opposing counsel agreed that an order should be issued to the State treasurer (Hiram M. Curry) that the total tax, plus interest on the specie, should be returned to the Bank. This the treasurer refused to do without a warrant. … He was thereupon placed under nominal arrest by a Federal marshal and all his property, including his keys, was attached.92,104

Hiram was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry, a non-resident, who owned 100 acres of 1st rate land on Buck Creek and 70 acres of 2nd rate land on Buck Creek in 1820 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.87,105

He resigned as treasurer of State of Ohio on 15 Feb 1820 in Ohio, United States.96,106107

He was  named in a bill concerning a memorial from H. M. Curry praying relief on 15 Feb 1820 .107

Hiram was  named in a bill read for th first time on 16 Feb 1820 .107

He was  named in a bill that was read for the second time on 17 Feb 1820 in Ohio, United States.107108

He was  was named in a bill that was discussed in the Ohio Senate’s committee of the whole on 18 Feb 1820 .107

Hiram was  was named in a bill discussed by the Ohio Senate committee of the whole on 21 Feb 1820 in Ohio, United States.107

He was   on 25 Feb 1820 in Ohio, United States.107

During a dispute with the Bank of the US an officer for the state of Ohio seized $98,000 in gold, silver and notes.  This was placed in charge of the State Treasurer, Mr. H. M. Curry.92,109

He was held the office of “late” Treasurer of state before 4 Dec 1820 in Ohio, United States.110

Hiram was accused of owing the State of Ohio $11,111 under a resolution proposed by Mr. Willson and agreed to by the Ohio House of Representatives on 7 Dec 1820.96,111

He was listed on the tax rolls as Hiram M Curry, a non-resident’ owning 100 acres of 1st rate land on Bucks Creek and 70 acres of 2nd rate land on Bucks Creek in 1821 in Champaign, Ohio, United States.87,112

He was  served with a writ of attachment commanding him to return into court a description of every note taken from the U.S. office of discount and deposit on 4 Jan 1821 in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio, United States.96,113114

Hiram was  excused from jury duty on 24 Mar 1821 in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio, United States.115116

He was  named in a memorial praying the state would receive real estate from him for the amount due the state on 27 Dec 1821 in Ohio, United States.117

Resolved by the senate and house of representatives, that a committee of members on the part of the senate, and five members on the part of the house of representatives, be appointed to take into consideration the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, and that they report thereon by bill or otherwise on 15 Jan 1822 in Ohio, United States.118

The senate have agreed to the resolution for appointing a joint committee on the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, with amendments and have appointed a committee of three members on their part on 17 Jan 1822 in Ohio, United States.118

On 18 Jan 1822, The Ohio house took up the resolution for appointing a joint committee on the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, with the amendment made by the senate thereto. in Ohio, United States.119

 Resolved by the senate and house of representatives, that one member on the part of the senate, and two members on the part of the house of representatives, be added to the joint committee appointed to take into consideration the memorial of Hiram M. Currey on 22 Jan 1822,120

 On 23 Jan 1822,  Mr. Parish from the joint committee to whom was referred the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, made the following report – The committee to whom was referred the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, report – That they have had the same under consideration, and after taking into view the value of the property offered, with reference to the amount of defalcation, a majority of this committee are of opinion that it is inexpedient to accede to the proposals of said memorialists. They therefore recommend the adoption of the following resolution– Resolved that the prayer of the memorial of Hiram M. Currey, is unreasonable and ought not to be granted. And on motion to disagree to said resolution, the question was decided in the affirmative. The yeas and nays being required by messrs. Atwater and Simons, were yeas 38, nays 26. 121

On 28 Jan 1822, Mr. Parish moved a resolution, to authorize the present treasurer to receive from Hiram M. Currey, and his trustee, a conveyance for the real estate of said Currey. Also, to release the securities to the second bond given by said Currey, as treasurer, from the liability, upon payment of the costs of suits now pending against them. Also, to direct the suites against said Currey, and the securities to the first bond giver by said Currey as treasurer of state to be prosecuted to final judgment, &c. Which resolution was laid on table for consideration.122

He was named in a resolution authorizing the Treasurer to receive real estate from Hiram M. Curry in Feb 1822 in Ohio, United States.123

In 1828 Hiram  conducted services held by Universalist people in a schoolhouse in Sheffield Township, Tippecanoe, Indiana, United States.124

He was listed as Hiram M. Curry with 1 male 70-80, 1 female under 5, 1 female 5-10, 1 female 15-20 and 1 female 30-40 in Village of Fairfield, Tippecanoe County, Indiana in 1830.125127

In 1830, he was appointed executor of the estate of Lemuel Lane in Franklin, Ohio, United States. 128

Between 1838 and 1839 Hiram was conducted services for Universalist Church in a school house in Sheffield Township, Tippecanoe, Indiana, United States.129130

ENDNOTES:

        1. Indiana, Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011, Amanda M. Thompson, 20 October 1900; database with images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017).

        2. Westmoreland County Pennsylvania 1783 Census Reprinted from Pennsylvania Archives (: Pennsylvania Archives,), p. 17 (Doc. #: Curry.PA.013).

        3. “Pennsylvania, Tax and Exoneration, 1768-1801,” database, Ancestry (Ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017), Mira Hiram Curry.

        4. “County of Fayette – 1786,” Returns of Taxables, Egle William Henry, editor, Pennsylvania Archives, series 3, Vol. 22 (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State Archives, ), p. 608.

        5. The Universal Register of the Baptist Denomination in North America for the Years 1790, 1791, 1792, 1793 and part of 1794 (New York: Arno Press, 1980)

        6. , Heads of Families First Census of the United States: 1790: State of Pennsylvania (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1908), p. 104https://archive.org/stream/headsoffamiliesa08unit#page/n9/mode/2up viewed online December 2017.

        7. 1790 U.S. Census Fayette County Pennsylvania, Fayette County Pennsylvania, population schedule, Bullskin, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, page 60, Curry, Miriach; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 1 August 2020); NARA microfilm publication M637.

        8. Collins, Lewis and Richard H Collins, History of Kentucky (: Genealogy Publishin Com, 1998), p. 564 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.002).

        9. Entry, 1790 to 1824 Tax Lists, 1792 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005), Mason Co. KY; V20-266. Hereinafter cited as Tax List Mason County Kentucky.

        10. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809. Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort.  Film #007834483. Hiram Currey, 1792 [Book]: [Page]; digitized microfilm, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online November 2017.007834483

        11. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky.

        12. Clift, G. Glenn, History of Maysville and Mason Co., KY (Lexington, KY: Translvania Printing Co., 1936), p. 318-319 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.016).

        13. Religion on the American Frontier: The Baptists 1783-1830 (New York: Henry Holt & Co., 1931)

        14. A series of Reminiscential Letters from Daniel Drake, M.D., of Cincinnati, to His Children (Cincinnati: Robert Clarke & Co., 1870)

        15. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky, 1795 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005).

        16. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry, Hyrummirick, 1795; .

        17. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry, Hiram, 1795; .

        18. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky, 1796 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005).

        19. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry M HIram, 28 Apr 1796; .

        20. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky, 1797 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005).

        21. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry, Hiram Mirum, 1797; .

        22. Fowler, Ila Earle, Kentucky Pioneers and Their Descendents (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1967), p. 109.

        23. 1790 to 1824 Tax List Mason County Kentucky, 1799, 1800, 1801 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.005).

        24. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry, HIram M, 1799; .

        25. Clift, Glen, Second Census of Kentucky, 1800 (Frankfort, KY: , 1954), (Doc. #: Curry.KY.001).

        26. “Kentucky, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes ndex, 1810-1890,” database, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017), Hiram M. Curry.

        27. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry HIram M, 19 Mar 1800; .

        28. “Kentucky, Tax Lists 1799-1801,” database online, Genealogy Publishing Company, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online 1 August 2020), Hiram M Curry.

        29. Mason County Kentucky Deed Book A-l 1789-1810 Abstracts (Denver: Western Heraldry Org, 1973), p. 97 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.030.

        30. Kentucky, Mason. Deeds, bks. F-G, 1799-1803. Kentucky, Frankfort.  Film #[FilmNumber]. Hiram Mirick Curry to James Luston, 30 Dec 1800 G: 97-98 (image 330-331); digital image, FamilySearch http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online November 2017.[FilmNumber]

        31. History of the Miami Baptist Assiciation from Its Organization in 1797 to a Division in that Body on Missions, etc. in the Year 1836 with Short Sketches of Deceased Pastors of this First Association in Ohio (Cincinnati: Geo. S. Blanchard & Co., 1869)

        32. Kentucky, Mason. Tax Lists, 1790-1809, Curry Hiram M, 13 May 1801; .

        33. Fowler, Ila Earle, Kentucky Pioneers and Their Descendents (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1967), p. 109 (Doc. #: Curry.KY.003).

        34. A History of Adams County Ohio (West Union Ohio: E. B. Stivers, 1900)

        35. Ohio Vital Records #2 1750-1880 (: Broderbund)

        36. Jackson, Ronald Vern, Gary Ronald Teeples and David Schaefermeyer, editors, Index to Ohio Tax Lists, 1800-1810 (Bountiful, UT: Accelerated Indexing Systems, 1977), p. 96 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.022).

        37. Jackson, Ronald Vern, Gary Ronald Teeples and David Schaefermeyer, editors, Index to Ohio Tax Lists 1800-1810 (Bountiful, Ohio: Accelerated Indexing Systems, Inc., 1977), Curry, H. Merack.

        38. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 318.

        39. Antrim, Joshua, The History of Champaign and Logan Counties from Their First Settlements (Bellefontaine, OH: Press Printing Co., 1872), p. 260 “Marriage Record Champaign County” (Doc. #: Curry.OH.065).

        40. “Ohio, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1790-1890,” database, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017), Mirach H Curry.

        41. Jackson, Ronald Vern, Gary Ronald Teeples and David Schaefermeyer, editors, Index to Ohio Tax Lists 1800-1810 (Bountiful, Ohio: Accelerated Indexing Systems, Inc., 1977), Curry, Mirach H..

        42. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1793-1810: Genealogical and Historical Abstracts (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1986), p. 150 (from Western Spy and Hamilton Gazette, No. 24, Volume VIII, Tuesday 6 January 1807, Whole No. 388) (Doc. #: Curry.OH.034).

        43. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1793-1810: Genealogical and Historical Abstracts (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1986), p. 157 (from Western Spy and Hamilton Gazette, No. 48, Vilume VIII, Monday, 22 Juen 1807, Whole No. 412).

        44. , “James McBride to Rev. John W. Borwne”, Quarterly Publication of the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio Vol 4 no. 1 (Jan – March 1909): P. 17.

        45. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 249.

        46. Bowman, Mary L., Abstracts and Extracts of the Legislative Acts and Resolutions of the State of Ohio:  1803-1821 (: Ohio Genealogical Society, ), p. 97.

        47. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1802-1818 (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1988), Hiram Mirach Curry

        48. Bowman, Mary L., Abstracts and Extracts of the Legislative Acts and Resolutions of the State of Ohio:  1803-1821 (: Ohio Genealogical Society, ), p. 97, p. 144 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.038).

        49. Ohio Source Records from the Ohio Genealogical Quarterly (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1986), p. 25 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.041).

        50. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 593 (Curry.OH.068).

        51. The State, 1809 Legistlative Journal Volume 8, Issue 1 (: Ohio, 1809), page 338 — Currey; Curry on multiple pages. Hereinafter cited as Journal, Volume 8, Issue 1.

        52. Petty, Gerald M., compiler, Ohio 1810 Tax Duplicate Arranged in a State-wide Alphabetical List of Names of Taxpayers with an Index of Names of Original Entries (Columbus, Ohio: Gerald M. Petty, 1976), p. 39 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.021).

        53. Jackson, Ronald Vern, Gary Ronald Teeples and David Schaefermeyer, editors, Index to Ohio Tax Lists 1800-1810 (Bountiful, Ohio: Accelerated Indexing Systems, Inc., 1977), Curry, M. Hivans.

        54. Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio being the First Session of the Ninth General Assembly (Chillicothe, H: Joseph S. Collins & Co., 1810), pages 51 – 64 (Docs\Curry\hiram currey contested senate.pdf. Hereinafter cited as Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio.

        55. , “”, P. 17.

        56. “Protest,” LIberty Hall (Cincinnati, Ohio), 15 May 1811; Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). page 3.

        57. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 399 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.024).

        58. Masonic Membership Card, , membership card Harmony Lodge No. 8 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.077).

        59. History of Logan County and Ohio (Chicago: O. L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, 1880), p. 364 (Doc. #: Curry.OH>033).

        60. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1802-1818: Genealogical and Historical Abstracts (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1988), p. 95 (from Western Spy Volume II, 14 March1812, No. 79) (Doc. #: Curry.OH.035).

        61. “Law of Ohio – “An act establishing the Miami University”,” Western Star (Lebanon, Ohio), 14 March 1812; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017).

        62. “Electors of President and Vice President,” LIberty Hall (Cincinnati, Ohio), 20 October 1812; Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017).

        63. Antrim, Joshua, The History of Champaign and Logan Counties from Their First Settlements (Bellefontaine, OH: Press Printing Co., 1872), p. 42 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.032).

        64. Entry Champaign County Ohio Tax Record vol. 177, Champaign Co. OH. Hereinafter cited as Tax Record Champaign County Ohio.

        65. Ohio, Champaign County. Duplicate Tax Records: 1816-1827.  Film #004849021. Cury, HIram M, 1816 digital images, Family Search http://www.familysearch.org : viewed online November 2017.004849021

        66. The Ohio Repository, Ohio Election – Representatives: Champaign — Hiram M. Curry, 21 November 1816; newspaper images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017). Original Source: The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio).

        67. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1817.

        68. Ohio, Champaign County. Duplicate Tax Records: 1816-1827, Curry, HIram M, 1817; .

        69. , “To Establish a Permanent Seat of Government”, Old Northwest Quarterly 15 (July-Oct 1912): p. 91. Hereinafter cited as “To Establish a Permanent Seat of Government”.

        70. Martin, William T., History of Franklin County, Ohio (Columbus: Follett, Foster & Co., 1858), p. 42, 194, 350,  (Doc. #: Curry.OH.017).

        71. Gilkey, Elliot Howard, The Ohio Hundred Year Book: A Hand-Book of the Public Men and Public Institutions of Ohio from the Formation of the North-West Territory (1787) to July 1, 1901 (Columbus, OH: Fred J. Heer, State Printer, 1901), p. 451 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.036).

        72. Green, Karen Mauer, Pioneer Ohio Newspapers, 1802-1818: Genealogical and Historical Abstracts (Galveston: Frontier Press, 1988), p. 235 (from Western Spy, Volume IX, Friday,3 January 1817, no. 52) (Doc. #: Curry.OH.035).

        73. Bowman, Mary L., Abstracts and Extracts of the Legislative Acts and Resolutions of the State of Ohio:  1803-1821 (: Ohio Genealogical Society, ), p. 254, 260, 277, 303, 320, 322.

        74. Taft, Bob, Official Roster of Federal, State & County Officers & Departmental Information for 1991-1992 (Ohio: Ohio Department of State, ), p. 349.

        75. Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio, Being the First Session of the Eighteenth General Assembly, Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Sixth, 1819: and in the Eighteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1819), p. 30-32.

        76. Martin, William T., History of Franklin County: A Collection of Reminiscences of the Early Settlement of the County; with Biographical Sketches, and a complete History of the County to the Present Time (Columbus: Follett, Foster & Company, 1858), p. 449 (Curry.OH.009).

        77. Green, Karen Mauer, , Hiram M. Curry.

        78. The Franklin County Genealogical Society, compiler, editor,  Genealogical Name INdex to the Ohio Supreme Court Records Frnaklin County, Volumes I, II, III, IV with reference dates 1783 to 1839 (Columbus, Ohio: The Franklin County Genealogical Society, 1983), p. 18 Curry HIram M..

        79. Martin, William T., History of Franklin County: A Collection of Reminiscences of the Early Settlement of the County; with Biographical Sketches, and a complete History of the County to the Present Time (Columbus: Follett, Foster & Company, 1858), p. 42 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.028).

        80. Moore, Orpha, History of Franklin County Ohio Volume One (Topeka, KS: Historical Publishing Company, 1930), Hiram M. Curry.

        81. Martin, William T., History of Franklin County: A Collection of Reminiscences of the Early Settlement of the County; with Biographical Sketches, and a complete History of the County to the Present Time (Columbus: Follett, Foster & Company, 1858), p. 350.

        82. History of Franklin and Pickaway Counties, Ohio with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of the Prominent Men and Pioneers (Cleveland, OH: Williams Brothers, 1880), p. 541 “First Penitentiary” (Curry.OH.002).

        83. , “To Establish a Permanent Seat of Government”, (Curry.OH.005).

        84. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1818.

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        86. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1819.

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        88. “Gettysburg Compiler”, (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania), p. 4, 8 Dec 1819 (Curry.OH.125);

        89. American Beacon (Norfolk, Virginia), 3 December 1819; Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Volume IX: Issue 102, page 2.

        90. National Intelligencer (Washington, D.C.), 30 November 1819; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). page 1.

        91. “Columbus, Nov 19,” Canton Repository (Canton, Ohio), 26 November 1819; digitial iamge, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Page 3.

        92. Aiello, John Douglas, Ohio’s War Upon the Bank of the United States: 1817-1824 (: Ohio State University, 1972), Hiram M. Currey.

        93. Smith, David, Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio being the First Session of the Nineteenth General Assembly Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Fourth, 1820; and in the Nineteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Ohio Monitor, 1820), pages 53-65.

        94. Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio, Being the First Session of the Eighteenth General Assembly, Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Sixth, 1819: and in the Eighteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1819), p. 66-67 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.026).

        95. Smith, David, Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio being the First Session of the Nineteenth General Assembly Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Fourth, 1820; and in the Nineteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Ohio Monitor, 1820), p. 30 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.026).

        96. “[Article],” [ItemType], Canton Repository (Canton, Ohio), [IssueDate], [SpecificContent]; digitial iamge, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : [AccessType] [AccessDate]); [CreditLine]. [Annotation].

        97. National Intelligencer (Washington, D.C.), 21 December 1819; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017); page 1.

        98. “From the Ohio Monitor,” Evening Post (New York, NY), 24 December 1819; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Issue 5466, page 2.

        99. “Columbia (Ohio) Nov. 18,” Weekly Aurora (Philadelphia, PA), 6 December 1819; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol X : Issue IIXL : Page 336.

        100. Canton Repository (Canton, Ohio), 17 December 1819; digitial iamge, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017); Page 3.

        101. Currey Hiram M., “Hiram M. Currey Letter To Thomas Rotch, Columbus, 21 Decr 1819,” letter, 21 December 1819, , Thomas and Charity Rotch Papers / Rotch-Wales Papers; Massillon Public Library, . available online at Ohio Memory, http://www.ohiomemory.org.  .

        102. “Re-elected,” Scioto Gazette (Chillicothe, Ohio), 24 December 1819; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Issue 19: page 3.

        103. Ohio Monitor (Columbus, Ohio), 13 January 1820; digital iamge, Genealogy bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol. IV : issue 26 : page 2.

        104. Utter, William T., The Frontier State 1803-1825 (Columbus, OH: Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 1942), p. 307-308.

        105. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1820.

        106. Gilkey, Elliot Howard, The Ohio Hundred Year Book: A Hand-Book of the Public Men and Public Institutions of Ohio from the Formation of the North-West Territory (1787) to July 1, 1901 (Columbus, OH: Fred J. Heer, State Printer, 1901), p. 451.

        107. Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio, Being the First Session of the Eighteenth General Assembly, Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Sixth, 1819: and in the Eighteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1819), Curry, HIram.

        108. Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, Being the First Session of the Eighteenth General Assembly (Columbus, Ohio: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1819), Curry, Hiram M..

        109. History of Champaign County, Ohio containing A History of the County; Its Cities, Towns, etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Champaign County; Constitution of the United States; Miscellaneous Matters, etc. etc. (Chicago: W. H. Beers, 1881), p. 127.

        110. Smith, David, Journal of the Senate of the State of Ohio being the First Session of the Nineteenth General Assembly Begun and Held in the Town of Columbus, in the County of Franklin, Monday, December Fourth, 1820; and in the Nineteenth Year of Said State (Columbus: Office of the Ohio Monitor, 1820), P. 56 (Doc. #: Curry.OH.027).

        111. Coggeshall Wm T., “Brief History of the Treasury of Ohio from 1802 to 1857,” Belmont Chronicle (Saint Clairsvillle, Ohio), 23 July 1857; Newspapers.com (http://www.newspaprs.com : viewed online September 2016).

        112. Tax Record Champaign County Ohio, 1821.

        113. “Ohio Legislature,” Ohio Monitor (Columbus, Ohio), 13 January 1821; digital iamge, Genealogy bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). vol V : issue 26 : page 1.

        114. “Legislature of Ohio,” Scioto Gazette (Chillicothe, Ohio), 4 January 1821; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol VI : Issue 21 : page 1.

        115. Ohio Monitor (Columbus, Ohio), 24 March 1821; digital iamge, Genealogy bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol V : issue 35 : page 3.

        116. Canton Repository (Canton, Ohio), 5 April 1821; digitial iamge, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). page 2.

        117. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio: being the First Session of the Twentieth General Assembly (Columbus, Ohio: Office of the Columbus Gazette, 1821), p. 159viewed online December 2017.

        118. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 221.

        119. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 229.

        120. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 246.

        121. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 254.

        122. , Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Ohio, p. 284.

        123. “Legislative Proceedings,” Steubenville Herald (Steubenville, Ohio), 9 February 1822; digital image, Genealogy Bank (genealogybank.com : viewed online November 2017). Vol XV : Issue 6 : page 2.

        124. DeHart, General R. P., Past and Present of Tippecanoe County, Indiana (Indianapolis, IN: B. F. Bowen, 1909), p. 253.

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Supporting Evidence

#DNA #52Ancestors

Do you ever look at a genealogy resource with rose colored glasses? In other words, do you perceive that resource as the one resource that will break thru brick walls? That is how I approached DNA testing.

Unlike many people who are testing their DNA, I already knew a lot about my ancestors. Even though the following chart was recently created with the preview edition of RootsMagic 8, I had most of these ancestors in my file when I started working with DNA over 5 years ago.

So, learning that autosomal DNA goes back 6 to 8 generations or 150-200 years was a disappointment. (information from Mark McDermott’s blog, How Many Generations Does DNA Go Back)

Even though DNA likely won’t help me identify that ‘next’ generation, I am finding that it is providing ‘Supporting Evidence’ for my current research.

For example, my Currey line goes thru several generations of Hiram Curreys to the Hiram Mirick Currey who was the treasurer of the state of Ohio in 1819. Through the years, I’ve worked with other researchers and collected documents that appear to support the lineage. However, I don’t have a deed, will or probate record that ties one generation to the next.

Thanks to Ancestry ThruLines, some of my matches show up as descendants of Hiram Mirick Currey thru his other children.

Not only do I look for descendants thru other children, I also look for descendants thru a different spouse. For example, my 2nd great-grandfather, Richmond Fisk Hammond, remarried after his wife, my 2nd great-grandmother died. He had a daughter thru this second marriage. ThruLines supports this second family.

Another example is my ancestor, James Crawford’s wife, Sarah Smith Duggins. Since she had a previous marriage, I’m hoping to use her ThruLines to learn more about my Smith ancestors.

I’ve found that my Ancestry ThruLines data can also point out spots in my tree that might be incorrect. For example, I have James B McCormick and Sarah Hall as the parents of Nancy Jane McCormick Ralston (1818-1907). When I look at ThruLines, James B. McCormick has 4 matches with two of those being my brothers. That’s not a lot of support for him being the father of Nancy, especially when compared to his wife Sarah Hall who has 30 DNA matches.

I’ve taken advantage of the ability to download my Ancestry DNA and upload my results to other sites, including GedMatch and My Heritage. Because my ancestry is basically colonial, my Ancestry results are providing more connections than My Heritage. Thus, I spend most of my ‘DNA time’ working with Ancestry data.

Not only was I wearing rose colored glasses when doing autosomal DNA testing, but also when having my brother do yDNA testing. I was hoping that this test would identify my Crawford ancestors. Unfortunately, that hasn’t proven to be true to date.

Even though yDNA hasn’t helped identify the parents of James Crawford, it has proven a connection with the other James Crawford families in Garrard County, Kentucky.

As pointed out by several genetic genealogists, tools such as triangulation or segment data are needed to prove a genetic relationship. These tools are not available on Ancestry where the majority of my DNA data resides. With an over-abundance of DNA data, I’m content (for now) with not being able to use my DNA data as scientific proof of a relationship. Instead, I will continue to use it as a tool to evaluate my tree and as a way to connect with cousins who might have additional information.

Same Name

This week’s #52Ancestors prompt is ‘Name’s the Same’. If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, then you are aware that my research involves a lot of James Crawfords, with most of them being unrelated.

It is a challenge to separate records for people of the same name living in the same community at the same time. That is the issue that has plagued my Crawford research. I have at least two and often more James Crawford families in the same area at the same time. (See: Untangling James Crawfords)

Like my Crawford research, I’ve had to be careful when researching several other families because there’s another family of the same name.

My William Thompson research is one area where I’ve encountered this. In Wapello county, Iowa, there are several William Thompsons in the early census records. My ancestor, William T. Thompson (1820-1898) is buried in the Ottumwa cemetery in Ottumwa, Iowa. Also buried in that cemetery is another William Thompson (1813-1892). This William Thompson was born in Ireland while my ancestor was born in Kentucky.

My Currey / Curry research is another area where I’ve struggled with same name issues. My great grandfather, Hiram M. Currey (1866-1945) was the son of Hiram M. Currey (1835-1901) who I believe was the son of Hiram M. Currey (1787-?) of Peoria, Illinois who may be the son of Hiram Mirick Currey of Ohio fame. Not only am I struggling with 4 generations of men of the same name, but the name Hiram seems to be a name commonly found among descendants of Thomas Currey of Adams county, Ohio.

One of those descendants, Hiram Meyrick Currey (1827-1898), son of William C. Currey and Hannah Adkins, is often confused in family trees with the Hiram Currey of Peoria, Illinois. Although there are not many records for the Hiram Currey of Peoria, there are records identifying his occupation as a lawyer. This piece of information helps separate the two men since Hiram Meyrick Currey (1827-1898) was a doctor. Additional research is needed, but these two men are likely first cousins.

All of this experience with ‘same name’ issues has taught me to question whether I could be encountering that complication when researching a family in a new area. My efforts to locate as many records as possible and to build out the family is what has helped me to separate these families. Keeping the families straight is why I often maintain information about the other family in my genealogy file.