Pets

1966-PeppyI recently watched a video that included a Golden Retriever puppy going down a slide. This brought back memories of our family dog, Peppy. Peppy joined the family while we were living on P street in Lincoln, Nebraska. When Peppy was a puppy, we would take him to Woods Park for him to go down a short children’s slide. Unfortunately, I don’t have any pictures of Peppy going down the slide.

1958-Crawford-Marcia-Terry-David-and-dog-SusiePrior to our move to Lincoln, our constant childhood companion was our dog, Susie. I don’t remember Susie as a pup, but I’m guessing she joined the family after our move to Dodge City when I was three. I do remember the tears when we found out Susie wasn’t going with us when we moved to Lincoln in 1967.

blackyAbout the time I was 8 or 9, a small black kitten joined the family – Blacky. Blacky loved to cuddle, but he was also a fighter. When we first got him, he had to wear a collar with a bell so that the birds would be scared away. One day, Blacky went missing. When he finally made it home, his right front paw was caught in his collar. That was the last day he wore a collar — until our move to Lincoln.

Lincoln had a leash law for cats and Blacky had to be kept on a leash when outside. Since he had always been able to go outside, he adapted to the collar and leash. We would clip his leash to the clothesline giving Blacky the ability to explore most of the yard. The squirrels would sit in the tree and taunt him. They seemed to know the limit of Blacky’s leash and stay out of his reach. One day, he hunkered down and waited. An unfortunate squirrel got within Blacky’s reach. Needless to say, the remaining squirrels left him alone after that.

sunnyShortly after my marriage, my husband, Michael, agreed that I could have a dog. Unfortunately, there was a stipulation with that — the dog couldn’t be in the house. Sunny and I made the best of the situation. Sunny would get to come in for short periods of time — he just couldn’t stay. During the summers, he would join me on my trips to summer school. While in Emporia, Sunny got to stay in the house!

JessieA year or two after Sunny’s death, a small gray cat began visiting our yard. I was allowed to feed her, but again ‘she couldn’t come in the house.’ She became Jessie and was taken to the vet for shots, etc. It didn’t take much time before Jessie was allowed in our house and became part of the family. Jessie was my cat. She loved spending time in my office watching the birds or curling up on the afghan with me for a nap.

Jake MikeWhen Jessie was about 10, a small yellow kitten began coming around the house. About the second day, the kitten jumped in Mike’s lap. Somehow, that kitten knew who he had to convince that he was our kitten! Jake is no longer a kitten, but a big yellow cat. Jake has always been Mike’s cat. Jake is a loving cat and purrs a lot. He allows me to pet him and sometimes will snuggle next to me. However, it is Mike’s attention he craves and Mike’s lap he seeks.

I still long for the companionship of a dog but love having a cat in the house!

Join the ‘Saturday Night Genealogy Fun’. What are your memories of the pets in your family?

3647dc41-b839-4484-9f95-761f941a6d62-5948-0000141b084c81d2

Radio

On Sunday, David Allen Lambert tweeted the question, “Did your family own a radio in 1930?” as part of the #ancestorchallenge2018. Even though I have obtained the 1930 census records for most people in my tree, I have to admit that I have not paid attention to that little detail.

When I checked the 1930 census for my grandparents, Leon and Winnie Crawford, I discovered that they did NOT own a radio. Myrtle Gaskill, Winnie’s sister, was listed just above Leon Crawford in the census and she also did NOT own a radio.

Leon-Radio

I then checked (re-checked) the census records for my grandparents, E. O. and Pauline Briles and for my great-grandparents, Judson and Josie Crawford, Edward G. and Artie Briles and Charles and Nettie Mentzer. None of the census records indicated ownership of a radio.

Since my knowledge of ‘radio history’ is very weak, I turned to the Internet for some background information. According to the Wikipedia article about radios, “commercial radio broadcasting began in the 1920s.”

I then wondered whether the communities where my ancestors lived had a radio station. Thanks to the website, U.S. Radio Stations as of June 30, 1930 by John Bowker, I discovered that Dodge City did have a radio station, KGNO. According to KGNO’s web site, they did not begin broadcasting until June of 1930. Since the Dodge City census record for Leon Crawford is dated 19 April 1930, the census data was collected prior to the existence of a local radio station in Dodge City. I did not find any radio station listed for Emporia, Kansas or any communities in Woodson or Coffey Counties, Kansas in 1930.

Even if they had had access, could they afford to purchase a radio? The web page, 1930’s appliances including prices, provides some pricing information. Towards the top of the page it lists a “Philco Auto Radio” for $24.95. At the bottom of the page is a “Philco Radio” which cost $188.00. Based on that pricing and the lack of a local radio station, I can understand why my relatives did not own a radio in 1930 — they couldn’t afford one.

Favorite Memories

Interview with my dad (and mom)

What are your favorite memories of your kids
D: Well, I remember collectively I remember how good a student they were. That was not a problem getting any one of the three of you to study and to perform well in school
M: I remember them playing out in the backyard in Dodge City with the neighborhood kids. I remember Dave burying his shoe in the sand when they were building the house next door.
D: Oh – I remember Dave hanging his glasses on the fence
D I remember you being sort of a judge or a referee with the neighborhood kids when playing especially when (what’s her name) (me – Shelly) – when all of you were playing together with Shelly – of course she was (me – down syndrome) retarded – she didn’t know what the rules were and how to play and I remember you sorting things out and keeping things calm and cool – nobody got hurt, nobody got in a fight.
D I remember Terry being a trainer for the basketball team and how important it was for him to do that job and how well he did it
D I also remember (him) going to the horse races and filming the horse races and how he thought at the time that was going to be his life work
D I remember him how proud he was when he bought his first car
M I remember Marcia getting her hood when she got her Masters librarian. And I remember I don’t know if it was your first date or what but you had a really pretty dress when we lived in Lincoln and you went out for a party (me – 9th grade formal – you bought me that dress in St. Louis when we went for your interview.)
M I don’t know if it would have to be a favorite memory but a very vivid memory was when Dave was in the hospital and they thought he had meningitis. He was strapped to the bed and they had IVs in him and he was literally strapped in bed and he was in isolation and we couldn’t go in and pick him up or anything. Just had to look thru the window at him (me – how old was he?) about 18 months – he had just gotten off the bottle and was dehydrated you both had had bad respiratory infections
D I remember picking him up out of the crib and trying to wake him up I remember picking him up out of the crib and he wouldn’t wake up he was so lifeless and it scared me – he was still in the hospital without a reason why he was there and I had to teach school and that was really tough.
Me – Did Dave go to an eye doctor in Emporia while we lived in Dodge City?
D – no
Me – Didn’t your bring him out here (Emporia) on the train?

 

 

 

Mary Foster Crawford

This week’s writing prompt for 52 Ancestors is ‘Strong Woman’. I have a lot of strong women in my family, including those young mothers modeling for their children what it means to be a gentle, kind mother while being a strong woman. Thus, it was hard to decide who to write about.

I’ve selected my great-great grandmother, Mary Foster Crawford (1842-1929) as an example of the strong women in my tree.

Mary Foster was born in 1842 in Warren County, Indiana. Like most women of that time period, most of Mary’s story comes from the story of her father and her husband. Since Mary’s father, Zebulon, was listed as a farmer on the 1850 census in Pike Township, Warren County, Indiana, Mary likely was raised on a farm.

At the age of 17, Mary married Washington Marion Crawford on 4 Mary 1860 in West Lebanon, Indiana. According to the 1860 census, Washington and Mary Crawford were living in Jordan Township of Warren County, Indiana. The young couple was establishing their home on a farm worth $2000 at the time. An affidavit included in Washington Marion Crawford’s military file provides more information about their farm life:

State of Indiana Warren County

Before me the undersigned authority personally appeared Washington M Crawford who being by me first duly sworn says my age is 46 years.

In the matter of my claim for Pension No 170744 my occupation has always been that of a farmer for five years preceeding my enlistment in Co H 2nd NY Cav. I worked on a farm for my father in Washington township Warren County Ind except the last year prior to the breaking out of the war. I moved to Jordan township and began farming for myself.

Mary’s life as a young wife changed when her husband enlisted in Company H of the 2nd New York Calvary. Washington Crawford’s affidavit continues to tell the tale of the young couple.

I continued there until August 3rd 1861 when I enlisted in the army in the above named Co and regiment. I was in all the engagements the regiment was in from the time of its organization until the 22nd day of Sept 1863 when I was taken prisoner in an engagement betwen Gen Kilpatrick and Gen Stewart near Liberty Mills, Va.

Whether Mary knew of her husband’s capture is unknown. Washington Crawford’s military record suggests that she may not have known since he is reported as “Missing in Action since Sept. 22, 1863” on several Company Muster Rolls including the March and April 1864 report.

Washington Crawford was imprisoned at Belle Isle in Virginia from his capture in Sept 1863 until March 1864. Then he was transferred to Andersonville Prison in Georgia. His affidavit continues with the story of his imprisonment.

The circumstances under which my disability was incurred was hardships of prison life such as being confined with thirty five thousand men on about sixteen acres of ground with insufficient food and no shelter except a government blanket which makes a poor shade and no shelter from the rain whatever I passed the winter of 1863 and 1864 in Belle Isle and in March 1864 I was taken to Andersonville Ga where I incurred the disability during the summer of 1864. I went from there to Charleston SC was there eighteen days and was then taken to Florence SC where on the 7th of Dec 64 I was paroled in the agreement between the two commitioners to exchange ten thousand sick

When her husband returned from the war, the young family moved in with his mother so his mother could help care for him. For the next few years, the family moved around a lot as Mary’s husband was under constant medical care, leaving Mary to care for their growing family.

I arrived home in June 1865 and remained on the old homestead with my mother and was treated by Dr Tebbs and Dr Greely who are both deceased. In 1866 I lived in Jordan township tried farming. and received treatments from Dr Frankeberger who is also deceased. in 1867 I lived in Washington township followed farming and was again treated by Dr Greely. I remained in Washington township until 1871 when I moved to Pike Township and followed farming there until 1873 when I again moved to Washington Township where I have remained to the present and have been following farming. …

I am not above to do more thane one fourth as much of any kind of farm work as I could before the war … all the work I do must be done under great difficulties and with great pain. I am frequently confined to the house and sometimes to my bed

Mary was fortunate to be surrounded by both her husband’s family and her family during this time. The need for family support is likely why the family moved to Dodge City Kansas in 1885. Washington’s brother, James H. Crawford, had moved his entire family to Dodge City in 1878. With family and land drawing them westward, the family moved to Dodge City where Washington Crawford paid $2 at the Garden City land office toward 160 acres of land in the SE 1/4 of Section 31 township 28 South of range 26 West. At about the same time, the family began the construction of a boarding house on 2nd Avenue in Dodge City.

In 1886, Washington and Mary faced another struggle as their daughter, Carrie died of consumption. A little over three years later, Mary would bury her husband, Washington Marion Crawford, next to her daughter.

It was the boarding house built in 1885 that provided a livelihood for Mary as she continued to raise her children.

I wish I knew more of the story from Mary’s eyes. I believe she was the glue that held the family together as they faced the after affects of her husbands imprisonment during the civil war. Thus, Mary Foster Crawford, is my example of a ‘Strong Woman.’

 

 

 

 

Eugene David Crawford

Eugene David Crawford1 was born on 8 Dec 1927 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.220

He lived in the 1st Ward in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 19 Apr 1930.21 He attended Roosevelt School between 1933 and 1946 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.22

Eugene was enrolled in the Beginners’ Department of the Methodist Episcopal Church on 1 Oct 1933.23 He lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas in 1935.24 He was promoted to the Intermediate Department of the Methodist Church on 1 Oct 1939.25

Eugene lived at 512 Ave G in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in Apr 1940.24 He lived at 512 Avenue G. in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in May 1942.26

He was promoted from Dodge City Junior High School on 27 May 1942 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.2728 Eugene lived at 512 Avenue G in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in 1943.29 He attended the Junior-Senior Banquet on 5 May 1944 at Dodge City High School in Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas.30 He attended Boys State representing Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States between 7 Jun 1944 and 14 Jun 1944.31 Eugene was the athletics’ student manager in 1945 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.32

He passed the Eddy Test and was technically qualified for Radio Technician training in the U.S. Navy on 6 Feb 1945.10,16 The Eddy Test was a test given to identify men with the capability and aptitude for being trained as electronics maintenance technicians in the U.S. Navy.33 He enlisted in the United States Naval Reserves on 15 Feb 1945 at U.S. Naval Reserve Station in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, United States.8,10,12,34 On 15 Feb 1945 at U.S. Navy Recruiting Station in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, United States, Eugene placed on active duty.1011 On 16 May 1945, he was received at the U.S. Naval Reserve Station in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.10 On 17 May 1945, he graduated from Dodge City Senior High School in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.8,3537 Eugene was recalled to active duty on 20 May 1945 at U.S. Naval Reserve Station in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, United States. He was transferred to the U.S. Naval Training Center in Great Lakes, Lake, Illinois, United States on 21 May 1945.10 He reported for active duty on 21 May 1945 at U.S. Naval Training Center in Great Lakes, Lake, Illinois, United States.10 Eugene was granted recruit leave from 9 Jul 1945 to 14 July 1945 at U.S. Naval Training Center in Great Lakes, Lake, Illinois, United States.10 He was transferred to the Navy Training College for study of pre-radio material at Wright Junior College in Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States on 20 Jul 1945.10 He was transferred to the Naval Training School (EE & RM) for a course of instructions at U.S. Naval Training Center in Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi, United States on 15 Aug 1945.10 Eugene was discharged from class V-6 US Naval Reserve on 4 Sep 1945.10 He enlisted in the U.S. Navy as a seaman 1st class radio technician on 5 Sep 1945 at Naval Training Center in Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi, United States.10 He reported for active duty in the U.S. Navy on 5 Sep 1945 in Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi, United States.10 Eugene was discharged this date for convenience of the government on 23 Oct 1945 at Naval Training Center in Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi, United States.10 He voluntarily enlisted in Class V6 US Naval Reserve on 23 Oct 1945 in Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi, United States.10 He was transferred to the Naval Training Center on 4 Jan 1946 at Great Lakes, Lake, Illinois, United States.10 Eugene was transferred to receiving station on 1 May 1946 in Shoemaker, California.10 He was transferred for duty aboard the U.S.S. Oneida (APA-221) on 20 May 1946.10,38 The USS Oneida (APA-221) was a Haskell-class attack transport.39 In Jun 1946, he served outside the continental limits of the United States in the Pacific Ocean around Guam and Samar from 1 Jun 1946 to 16 July 1946 aboard the USS Oneida (APA-221)40 During this time, the U.S.S. Oneida participated in Operation Magic Carpet, returning veterans to the states.41 Eugene was transferred to the receiving station on 24 Jul 1946 at Treasure Island in San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States. He  received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Navy as Seaman First Class V-6 USNR on 1 Aug 1946 in Norman, Cleveland, Oklahoma, United States.10,12,4244

He was educated between Sep 1946 and May 1948 at Dodge City Community Junior College in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.11,45 Eugene graduated from Dodge City Junior College  in May 1948 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.8,4647 He was educated between Sep 1948 and 1950 at Kansas State Teachers College in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.11,4849 He was member of Phi Delta Kappa in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.50 Eugene was initiated into Kansas Beta Chapter of Kappa Mu Epsilon (Mathematics Fraternity) on 14 Mar 1949 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.5152 He was member initiated into memebership in Lambda Delta Lambda National Physical Science Fraternity on 29 Mar 1949 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.53 He was member of Lambda Delta Lambda (Physical Science Honorary Society), Kansas State Teachers College between 1949 and 1950 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.5455 Eugene was a member of Sigma Pi Sigma; National Physics Honor Society. He received Degree of Chevalier in the Grand Council of the Order of DeMolay on 23 Mar 1950.5657 He was awarded a graduate fellowship at Kansas State Teachers College on 11 May 1950 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.58 Eugene graduated from Kansas State Teachers College receiving a Bachelor’s of Science in Education degree on 25 May 1950 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States .11,5962 He graduated from Kansas State Teachers College receiving a Master’s of Science degree on 24 May 1951 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States .8,11,6364

His son, Duane Gail Crawford, was born at Trinity Hosptial in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States on 23 Dec 19536568 He witnessed the death of Duane Gail Crawford on 24 Dec 1953 at Trinity Hospital in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.65,6872

Eugene lived at 2210 N. 5th Ave in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States between 1954 and 1966.11,7374 He lived at 2210 N. 5th Ave in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in 1955.75 He lived at 2010 N. 5th in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in 1957.76 Eugene was member of Kansas State Teachers Association and elected as delegate to state assembly in Feb 1958 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.77 He lived at 2210 5th Av in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in 1959 and was employed as a teacher at Dodge City College.78 He lived in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in 1960 and was employed as a teacher at Dodge City College.79 In May 1960, Eugene attended the graduation of Leon Crawford at Emporia State College in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.80 He lived and was employed as a teacher at Dodge City College at 2210 N. 5th Ave in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in 1961.81 He lived at 2210 5th Av in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States in 1962 and was employed as a teacher at Dodge City College.82 On on 16 Aug 1964 Eugene attended Currey family reunion in Sedona, Arizona, United State.83 He  was granted the Herbert Brownell Fellowship Science Education in 1966 at University of Nebraska in Lincoln, Lancaster, Nebraska, United States.84

He lived in Lincoln, Lancaster, Nebraska, United States between 1966 and 1967.85 Eugene lived in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States between 1967 and 1989.85 He became a life member of National Science Teachers Association on 1 Dec 1967 .86 He graduated from the University of Nebraska receiving a Doctorate of Education degree on 20 Aug 1971 in Lincoln, Lancaster, Nebraska, United States .8,11,87

Eugene held the office of president of the Kansas Association of Teachers of Science in 1973–1974 .88 In Sep 1973, he was one of the instructors in an energy course to be offered by Kansas State Teachers College at Burlington, Coffey, Kansas, United States.89 He attended the annual spring meeting of the Kansas Association of Teachers of Science in May 1974 .88

On on 21 Jul 1974 Eugene attended Briles Family Reunion in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.90 He witnessed the power of attorney of Leon Russel Crawford and Winnie Letha Currey on 20 Sep 1976 in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.91 He attended the funeral of Herbert Wells Mentzer  on 28 Mar 1977 in Coffey, Kansas, United States.92

Eugene retired on 13 May 1993 at Emporia State University in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.93 He received Technician level Amateur Radio License with call sign N0ZMN on 16 Jun 1999.94

He celebrated 49 years of marriage with children and 2 grandchildren on a trip to Branson, Missouri in Jun 2001.95

Eugene announced to family that he had entered hospice care due to the progression of his bone cancer on 6 Aug 2006 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.96 He died on 14 Sep 2006 at the age of 78 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.7,11,18,20,97105 The funeral of he was held  at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church on 16 Sep 2006 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.11,106107 Eugene was cremated in Sep 2006 at and his ashes were spread over graves of E.O. and Pauline Briles and in Jones Park in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.8,11,108 A headstone for he was placed at Maple Grove Cemetery in Dodge City, Ford, Kansas, United States.103,109110

 

Preparer:

Marcia Philbrick

Seneca, KS

 

  1. Eugene David Crawford, Birth Certificate #229 1781, (Crawford.Leon.Notebook) (1927).
  2. Army Service Record Book, Register of Deeds, Ford County Kansas, Book 2 1945-1946, p. 587 (Doc #: CRAWFORD.KS.108).
  3. Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Ancestry, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com).
  4. Kansas, State Board of Health 229 1781 (8 December 1927); Division of Vital Statistics, Topeka, Kansas.
  5. Physician’s Birth Certificate Eugene David Crawford, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, Seneca, Kansas, 2016. [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook]. Passed down to Marcia Crawford by her grandmother Winnie Crawford.
  6. Eugene Crawford Baby Book, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook]. Passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Crawford.
  7. Eugene David Crawford funeral program, Roberts-Blue-Barnett Funeral Home; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, [address for private use], Seneca, Kansas, 2015. Obtained by Marcia Philbrick while attending funeral.
  8. “Emporia Gazette”, 15 September 2006, (Emporia, KS), to (), [Cd]; Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas. Hereinafter cited as “Emporia Gazette”.
  9. Kansas Birth Registration Card, Eugene David Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Roberta Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  10. “Crawford, Eugene David personnel file,'” Seaman First Class V-6 USNR 343 46 97, National Personnel Records Center, National Archives, St. Louis, Missouri.
  11. “Dr. Eugene David Crawford,” Dodge City Daily Globe (Dodge City, Kansas), 15 September 2006; database with transcription, Genealogy Bank (www.genealogybank.com : viewed online March 2017).
  12. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, “U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death File, 1850-2010,” database, Ancestry, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online June 2017), Eugene Crawford.
  13. Ancestry.com, 1940 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012), Year: 1940; Census Place: Dodge City, Ford, Kansas; Roll: T627_1231; Page: 16B; Enumeration District: 29-6A.
  14. Ancestry.com, 1930 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002), Year: 1930; Census Place: Dodge, Ford, Kansas; Roll: 702; Page: 16B; Enumeration District: 0005; FHL microfilm: 2340437.
  15. Ancestry.com, U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012).
  16. Ancestry.com, U.S., Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death File, 1850-2010 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011).
  17. Ancestry.com, U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 2 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010).
  18. Ancestry.com, Web: Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012).
  19. Ancestry.com, U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015).
  20. Ancestry.com, U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011), Issue State: Kansas; Issue Date: Before 1951.
  21. 1930 U.S. Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, ED 24-5, Sheet 16B, dwelling 363, Crawford Leon; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017); NARA T626.
  22. Report of Progress for Eugene Crawford, Dodge City Schools; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Philbrick [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  23. Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Certificate of Promotion to Primary Department of the Methodist Episcopal Church School. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford.
  24. 1940 U. S. Census, Ford County, Kansas, population schedule, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas, ED 29-6A, Sheet 16B, household 362, Crawford Leon R; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 217).
  25. Methodist Church School, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. certificate of promotion for Eugene Crawford to Intermediate Department. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford.
  26. War Ration Book One, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Eugene David Crawford. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford [Crawford.Leon.Notebook].
  27. Dodge City Junior High school Certificate of Admission to Senior High School, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook]. passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Crawford.
  28. Dodge City Junior High School, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Freshman Class Day. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford.
  29. War Ration Book No. 3, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Eugene D. Crawford. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford [Crawford.Leon.Notebook].
  30. Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Junior-Senior Banquet Program. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford.
  31. “Eleven Ford County Boys Attend Boys State,” undated clipping, 1944, from unidentified newspaper; Crawford Family Papers, Passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Crawford; privately held 2015 by Marcia Crawford Philbrick, [address for private use], Seneca, KS 66538.
  32. Dodge City High School Yearbook, 1945 (n.d.), image 24 of 64; digital images, Ancestry, U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 (ancestry.com : viewed online February 2016).
  33. Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org : accessed February 2017), Eddy Test.
  34. Kansas. Ford County, Military Service Record, Army Service Record Volume 2: 587, Honorable Discharge United States Navy; Register of Deeds, Dodge City.
  35. Graduation Announcement, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Eugene Crawford. Passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  36. Dodge City High School Commencement Program May 1945, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Philbrick [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  37. Dodge City High School Diploma, Eugene David Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Philbrick [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  38. Kansas. Ford County, Military Service Record, Army Service Record Volume 2: 587, Honorable Discharge United States Navy.
  39. Wikipedia, USS Oneida (APA-221).
  40. Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Affidavit concerning Naval Record by Eugene Crawford. obtained form Ford County Court House.
  41. Wikipedia, U.S.S. Oneida (APA-221).
  42. Kansas. Ford County, Military Service Record, vol. 2, 1945-1946: p. 587, Eugene David Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  43. “Notice of Separation,'” Eugene Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook], U.S. naval Service, Aug. 7, 1946, Ford County Kansas Register of Deeds, Dodge City, Kansas.
  44. Certificate of Satisfactory Service United States Navy, Eugene David Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Roberta Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  45. Dodge City Junior College Diploma, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. awarded to Eugene Crawford. passed on to Marcia Philbrick after the death of her father.
  46. Dodge City Junior College Diploma, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. awarded to Eugene David Crawford. passed on to Marcia Philbrick after the death of Eugene Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  47. Dodge City Junior College 13th Annual Commencement Program May 1948, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Philbrick [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  48. Kansas State Teachers College Sunflower (Emporia, Kansas: Kansas State Teachers College), 1950, p. 33; 1951 p. 67 (Crawford.KS.168)
  49. Kansas State Teachers College Transcript, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Eugene David Crawford. Passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  50. Certificate of Life Membership in Phi Delta Kappa, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Eugene David Crawford. Passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  51. Kansas State Teachers College Sunflower (Emporia, Kansas: Kansas State Teachers College), 1950 p.164; 1950 p.33 (Crawford.KS.168)
  52. Kappa Mu Epsilon Certificate of Initiation, Eugene Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down to Marcia Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  53. Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Membership certificate for Eugene D. Crawford in Lambda Delta Lambda. passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford.
  54. Membership Certificate Lambda Delta Lambda, Eugene D. Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down to Marcia Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  55. Kansas State Teachers College Sunflower (Emporia, Kansas: Kansas State Teachers College), 1950 Sunflower page 33, 67 [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook]
  56. Letter from Frank Land, Secretary General Grand Council of Order of DeMolay dated 6 March 1950, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down from Winnie Crawford to Marcia Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  57. Letter from Frank Land, Secretary General Grand Council of the DeMolay regarding qualifying for ‘degree of chavalier’, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, Seneca, Kansas, 2016.
  58. Letter from John E. Jacobs, Director Graduate Division, Kansas State Teachers College, Eugene Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down to Marcia Philbrick [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  59. Kansas State Teachers College of Emporia Diploma, Eugene David Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Passed down by Roberta Crawford to Marcia Philbrick [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  60. Commencement Exercises Kansas State Teachers College May 25, 1950 Program, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  61. Kansas State Teachers College of Emporia Register’s Office Certificate, Eugene David Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. graduation, May 1950. passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Philbrick [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  62. “Emporia Gazette”.
  63. Kansas State Teachers College of Emporia Diploma, Eugene David Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed on to Marcia Philbrick after the death of her father, Eugene Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  64. Kansas State Teachers College Graduation Announcement, May 1951; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down to Marcia Philbrick [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  65. Tombstone, Maple Grove Cemetery, Dodge City Kansas read by Marcia Philbrick, 1996, Duane Gail Crawford tombstone (Crawford.KS.152).
  66. Eugene Crawford Family, Bible of Roberta Adele Crawford (: , ); Roberta Adele Crawford, Hondo, Texas. Hereinafter cited as Bible of Roberta Crawford.
  67. Trinity Hospital (Dodge City, Kansas) Certificate of Birth, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Duane Gail Crawford. Passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Roberta Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  68. Duane Gail Crawford, death certificate certificate # 53 018088 [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook] (1953 death), Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Office of Vital Statistics, Topeka, KS.
  69. Funeral book for Duane Gail Crawford, 1953, (Crawford.Eugene.Notebook),
  70. “One of Twin Boys Dies,” undated clipping, 1954, from unidentified newspaper; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, [address for private use], Seneca, KS. from Emporia Gazette.
  71. Duane Gail, obituary, unidentified clipping, Crawford Family Papers.
  72. Funeral Home Record for Duane Gail Crawford, Swaim Funeral Home; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Copy obtained from Swaim Funeral Home January 2000 [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  73. Interview with Marcia Crawford Philbrick (Seneca, Kansas), 1952-2015. (Seneca, KS).
  74. “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995”, database, Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : online 4 December 2015), 91, Crawford, Eugene; citing “Polk’s Dodge City (Ford County, Kansas) Directory 1960: Including Ford County (Kansas City, Missouri: R. L. Polk & Co., 1960).”
  75. Polk’s Dodge City (Ford County, Kansas) Directory 1955 (Kansas City, MO: R. L. Polk & Co, 1955), page 48, Crawford; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017).
  76. “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995”, database, Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017), page 109, Crawford; citing “Polk’s Dodge City Directory 1957: Including Ford County (Kansas City, Missouri: R. L. Polk & Co., 1957).”
  77. “Agree Convention, Hunting Don’t Mix,” news report, Garden City Telegram (Garden City, Kansas), 7 November 1958, meeting of the Garden City section of the Kansas State Teachers Association; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online September 2016).
  78. “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995”, database online, Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017), page 137, Crawford; citing “Polk’s Dodge City (Ford County, Kansas) Directory 1959: Including Ford County (Kansas City 5, Mo: R. L. Polk & Col, Publishers, 1959).”
  79. “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995,” database, Ancestry.com, page 42, Crawford.
  80. “Society,” digital image, The Emporia Gazette (Emporia, Kansas), 24 May 1960; Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online January 2017).
  81. Ancestry.com, U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011), Polk’s Dodge City (Ford County Kansas) Directory 1961; page 44 (image 87).
  82. “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995”, database on-line, Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : viewed online November 2017), page 44, Crawford Eug D; citing “Polk’s Dodge City (Ford County, Kansas) Directory 1962: Including Ford County (Kansas City 5, Missouri: R. L. Polk & Co, 1962).”
  83. “Newspaper clipping from unknown newspaper”,  Taylors Host Family Reunion;  Hereinafter cited as “Newspaper clipping”.
  84. “Receives Fellowship,” undated clipping, 1966, from unidentified newspaper; Crawford Family Papers, passed down to Marcia Philbrick by Winnie Crawford; privately held 2015 by , .
  85. Interview with Marcia Crawford Philbrick (Seneca, Kansas).
  86. Certificate of Life Membership National Science Teachers Association, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Eugene David Crawford. Passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  87. University of Nebraska Diploma, Eugene David Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Doctor of Education. Passed down to Marcia Crawford after death of her father, Eugene Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  88. “Attend Annual Event of Science Teachers,” The Emporia Gazette (Emporia, Kansas), 6 May 1974; newspapers.com (http://www.newspapers.com : online September 2015).
  89. “Energy Course Offered for Burlington Residents,” The Emporia Gazette (Emporia, Kansas), 15 September 1973; Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : viewed online January 2017).
  90. “Family Has Reunion.”
  91. Leon Crawford Power of Attorney, Sept. 1976; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. passed down by Winnie Crawford to Marcia Philbrick [Crawford.Leon.Notebook].
  92. “”In Memoriam” Herbert W. Mentzer LeRoy business man dies Friday a.m.,” undated clipping, from unidentified newspaper; Crawford Family Papers, (Charles Mentzer Notebook); privately held 2015 by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, KS.
  93. Eugene D. Crawford Certificate of Service Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas, 13 May 1993, in , privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. Certificate of Service. received from Roberta Briles Crawford.
  94. Amateur Radio License, Eugene D. Crawford; Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. N0ZMN. passed down to Marcia Crawford from Roberta Crawford [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  95. Vacation to celebrate 50th wedding anniversary, article probably from Emporia Gazette, unidentified clipping, Crawford Family Papers.
  96. Interview, Marcia Crawford Philbrick, 1952-2015, Marcia Philbrick was present when this was announced.
  97. Personal knowledge of the author, Marcia Crawford Philbrick, [address for private use]. Philbrick, the daughter of Eugene Crawford was present shortly after his death.
  98. Eugene Crawford Funeral program, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. program obtained by Marcia Philbrick while attending funeral.
  99. , “Emporia Gazette”, Obituaries – 15 Sept 2006.
  100. “Eugene David Crawford,” Wichita Eagle (Wichita, Kansas), 15 September 2006; GenealogyBank (www.genealogybank.com : viewed online March 2017).
  101. Ancestry.com, U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015), Eugene David Crawford.
  102. Ancestry.com, U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011), Issue State: Kansas; Issue Date: Before 1951.
  103. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, Eugene Crawford.
  104. U.S., Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death File, 1850-2010, Eugene Crawford.
  105. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Eugene Crawford.
  106. Interview, Marcia Crawford Philbrick, 1952-2015, attended the funeral.
  107. Christian Funeral Service for Eugene D. Crawford, Crawford Family Papers; privately held by Marcia Philbrick, , Seneca, Kansas, 2016. obtained by Marcia Crawford Philbrick while attending funeral [Crawford.Eugene.Notebook].
  108. Interview, Marcia Crawford Philbrick, 1952-2015, attended the consultation with the funeral home; assisted with the distribution of the ashes.
  109. Find a Grave, database and images, Find a Grave (www.findagrave.com : accessed 3 September 2015), memorial for Eugene D. Crawford, Find a Grave Memorial no. 30639362, created by Cathy Kessinger, citing Maple Grove Cemetery, Dodge City, Kansas; accompanying photograph by Cathy Kessinger, .
  110. BillionGraves, digital images of tombstone, BillionGraves (billiongraves.com : viewed online August 2017), memorial for Eugene D. Crawford (1927-2006), BillionGraves created by mcphilbrick, citing Maple Grove Cemetery, Dodge City, Ford County, Kansas; accompanying photograph by mcphilbrick, Eugene D. Crawford.

 

 

Tombstone Challenge Accepted

This week’s ‘Saturday Night Genealogy Fun‘ challenge was to figure out how far back a line can be traced thru tombstones. My immediate reaction was that it was probably thru my dad’s CRAWFORD line

There are 4 generations of CRAWFORDs buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Dodge City, Kansas

  • Dad: Eugene Crawford
  • Granddad: Leon Russel Crawford
  • Great Grandfather: Judson Crawford
  • Great Great Grandfather: Washington Marion Crawford (headstone and footstone shown)

My 3rd great grandfather is buried in the West Lebanon cemetery just outside of West Lebanon, Indiana.

My 4th great grandfather is buried in the cemetery at Eaton, Ohio.

1878 Cattle Drives

In searching for an advertisement enticing settlers into the Dodge City area, I came across the following article discussing the round-up of cattle and the cattle drives during 1878.

The Kansas and Colorado Cattle Drives

[Dodge City Correspondence New York Times]

The Indiana State Sentinel, Wednesday July 10, 1878

Page 7 column 6

[available on Chronicling America]

                The cattle men of the plains are just getting through with their annual ‘round-ups’. For the Arkansas valley and the divide country West Los Animas was the rendezvous; and the scattered cattle for miles along the river and out on the buffalo ranges were gathered to that point. Camps were established, all the leading cattle men, were on hand and the “cow boys” were in their glory. It was the work of only a few hours to “cut out” and separate the cattle and start the herds back to their ranges again. Every animal is known by its brand, so that ownership is easily determined, and those that have drifted miles away during the winter storms and become a part of other herds are picked out in a few minutes, claimed by the owners and started back to the range. It has been a good winter for stock in this valley; no bad storms and plenty of grass. The cattle are in prime condition, and beeves for the early fall market will sell better than the average. By comparing notes among the herders it was found that the range between Fort Lyon and Bent’s Fort – Kit Carson’s old hunting grounds – an uninviting and barren looking section, contains more cattle than any similar area on the plains. Over 75,000 head are figured up.

               As all the heavy stock men and shippers just now seem to be bound for one place – Dodge City – the point at which the ‘drives’ of Texas cattle come up, your correspondent took a train on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad and a seven hours’ ride landed us at midnight in this noisy cattle mart. No one seemed to be asleep at that hour. The station was thronged with swaggering, swearing cow boys and oily confidence men. With some difficulty we rubbed our way through the crowd and followed the porter to the Great Western hotel. Any of our companions that might be bent on sport could need no special beckoning, for in all the billiard halls, concert saloons and keno dens the lamp still held out to burn.

Seen by daylight Dodge City has a better look, though somehow pretty much all the buildings, which are of frame, lurch to the west as if impatient to move on, the effect of high prairie winds. The population cation not be farm from 1,000, though there is a large floating element, increasing rapidly, and a month later, when the cattle are swarming and prices are at high tide, there will be in the town and outskirts as many as 5,000 people. The cattle shipping season gathers traders, speculators, gamblers and all sorts. Through June and July Dodge City will be the liveliest place in the west. The best trails from the pan-handle of Texas strike the railroad and river at this point, if it is outside the ‘dead line’ prescribed by Kansas laws, and offers every facility for large stock transactions. There are in this vicinity about 120,000 head of Texas ‘beeves’ already arrived and ready to be marketed. There are on the trail between Dodge and Cimarron 50,000 more. The last accounts from the south indicate that there are upward of 225,000 head of cattle moving northward from Red river, fully one half of which will take the trail to Dodge City.

             About the 1st of July the larger shared will have arrived here and the shipping will begin in earnest. There will probably be put on the cars at this station from 30,000 to 40,000 beeves for Kansas City, St. Louis and Chicago. The greater share of the cattle that are driven to this point from Texas do not go into eastern markets yet. They will be allowed to feed their way westward and northward, and two months later will appear at stations on the Kansas Pacific and Union Pacific roads further east, some to be shipped to Kansas City and Omaha, but the great bulk remain feeding on the plains until next spring. The cattle “drives” from Texas each year represent a great deal of money, and are in the hands of comparatively few men. The herds of the thirty largest owners will aggregate about 200,000 head.

The several smaller ‘bunches’ will swell the table to between 225,500 and 250,000. Some claim that the number will reach 300,000. About 45,000 are detained for Dodge City, principally for eastern shipment. While a large share of the others enumerated will come by trail to Dodge City, they will be driven up the Arkansas and Purgotoire, or into the pars and over the divide into the Platte valley. A good many will go to the ranges on the Republican. In the past three or four years not all the cattle that have come up from Texas have been marketed, but have been multiplying and increasing in the valleys and along the high ranges. Taking into account the large number of cattle annually driven into the territories and new states of the west and the natural increase of the herds, the cattle trade is, of course, growing into greater magnitude every year. It is a noteworthy fact that the cattle interest of the Rocky mountain region and the plains on the East is receiving large accessions form the west also.

            It was considered somewhat wonderful a few years ago when Texas was credited with 4,000,000 head of cattle. That state was looked upon as our beef supply for years to come, and the great plains at that time counted as absolutely worthless for any purpose, were not even looked upon as even the smallest factor in the matter of supplying the east and Europe with marketable cattle. But a great revolution has taken place even in a short time. The “long horns” still come up every season to be put into market, but the numbers arriving at Kansas City and Chicago from that source are decreasing year by year. The cattle grounds are being transferred to the great buffalo plains and the central portion of the continent with the Pacific states, are becoming the leading producers of beef. An estimate derived from the assessment return gives Colorado 550,000; Wyoming 225,000; Utah, 350,000; Montana 300,000; Washington 2000,000; Oregon 175,000; and California 650,000 cattle. This make a total of nearly 2,750,000 market beeves which will be taken during the next three or four months into the markets east of the Missouri river.